January 2018 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

Feb. 12, Monday, 6:30 pm:  Virginia Vanture will be presenting a thirty minute slide show on the old Cannery.  The Old Market Brew Pub now occupies the building at the confluence of Multnomah Blvd. and Garden Home Road.

March 12, Monday, 6:30:  Annual meeting, election of officers. Currently:

  • Chair: Patsy VandeVenter
  • Vice-chair:  Elaine Shreve
  • Secretary, Treasurer: Marie Pacella
  • Board members:  Stan and Susan Houseman, Carole Vranizan, Jan Fredrickson, Mark Kajitani, Virginia Vanture

News

Dorothy Johnson Stevens and Pat Boone – 2017

Our Holiday greetings to all of our Garden Home friends and families.  Thank you for sharing your stories and photos.  Thank you for your interest, your attendance at our many events and your donations to sustain our historical research and community education.  Thank you to our Board of Directors for their diligent efforts to present our history.

This greeting from Dorothy Johnson Stevens reminds us of a young Garden Home girl who became Miss Oregon in 1955.  Her dad had the service station and she lived next door. She went on to become the first runner-up for Miss America and then on to Hollywood!  She starred in Bernadine along with Pat Boone, and still a beauty!

Thank you to all who visited us at the December 2 Holiday Bazaar!  We sold all of the historic oatmeal cookie recipe jars.

Black Rock Coffee Shop: This new enterprise has made its appearance via a huge crane lifting the prefab pieces into place!  This drive-through and table service café is located adjacent to the Buy 2/Shell station on SW Garden Home Road. The exit from the Shell station onto SW Garden Home Rd has been modified to prevent turning left onto SW Garden Home Rd.

This Spring: We’re gathering the unique features of Garden Home that we’ll unfold for you in some manner, wonderful surprises! Stay posted for the details.

This fall we enjoyed a September presentation on Garden Home through the DecadesThis slide show of work by PCC student Spenser Kuroda features the building history of Garden Home since 1950. Tom Shreve presented this and reference material to an appreciative audience. Spenser’s report can be found on our Resources page.

Our October 9 program, Show and Tell from your family or a Garden Home treasure  brought out some interesting items. Cheryl Clark brought a selection of old bottles she retrieved from what seemed to be an old garbage dump near SW 92nd and Fanno Creek. Anyone else remember this garbage dump? Another find was a secreted old report card, reporting on student bad behavior, presumably hidden from parent eyes!

Other News

Remembering many of our other stories. These fun excerpts from our stories are just samples of the content you can discover browsing our almost 200 articles. We hope you are writing your story for your family.

Colin Lamb: The electricity was off in the Garden Home area for about a week after the Columbus Day storm in 1962. Of course, many homes had no heat so Dad left the presto logs out in the front of the store with a note to pay for them the next day.

Dan Nebert: Therefore, the church window at all times seemed to remain unlocked, so that we were always able to enjoy our rainy Saturday afternoon ping-pong games.

Plane crash: Lt Strong managed to guide the plane over the town of Metzger to what looked like a wooded area before bailing out and landing in some nearby trees unhurt.

Zora and Sharka Becvar: We sat for a little while and, since we did not understand what the teacher was saying, we just looked at each other, got up and left the room and went home.

Bob Feldman: you might have seen young Bob Feldman riding his bike home from Garden Home School precariously toting a pail of slop from the cafeteria to feed his new baby pigs. 

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had 5 thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. March 12 will be a special meeting for the public with refreshments and summaries by the Chair and the Treasurer. The plans for the year’s activities will be shared. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Get your Historic Garden Home t-shirt now for just $14 for small to XL. Larger XXL and XXXL sizes are $17. There is an additional charge of $9 to mail your shirt. They’re fun! Available at the Garden Home Market Place.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

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Kenneth Thomas Mistler obituary

Kenneth Thomas Mistler, July 29, 1940 to December 27, 2017

Kenneth Thomas Mistler

Kenneth Thomas Mistler passed away Wednesday, Dec. 27, 2017, at St. Vincent’s hospital from complications after heart surgery. He was surrounded by his wife, his daughter and his two sisters.

Ken was born at the original location of that same hospital July 29, 1940, to Marie Cecelia Rasmussen, daughter of Danish immigrant Andy Rasmussen, and his wife, Birdie. He would be followed by sisters, Cindy and Eilleen and brothers, Walter, Terry and Ted, in that order. Kenneth’s father for most of his life was his mother’s second husband, Phillip J. Mistler.

Ken and his brothers and sisters grew up in the Garden Home and Metzger areas, attending Garden Home Grade School and Beaverton High School. For much of high school, he worked at the Chevron service station owned by his uncles, Paul and Wilbur Rasmussen, which still stands at the intersection of Hwy. 99 and 217.

He was the first person in his family to attend college, putting himself through Portland State University as the nighttime manager of the downtown YMCA. It was while working at the YMCA that he met his first wife, the nighttime switchboard operator and a fellow student at PSU, Kathy Simer, with whom he had one child, a daughter named Mickey, born in 1967.

After PSU, they worked hard to put him through Lewis & Clark Law School, where he was one of the founding editors of the first environmental law review in the country. He would sometimes show people the letter he received from President Nixon commending him on this achievement.

Kenneth received a special dispensation from the Oregon State Bar to start working as a Deputy District Attorney for Washington County before he’d actually had a chance to take the bar exam, which he said really put the pressure on to pass it (which he did).

Prosecuting criminals was rewarding, but emotionally grueling work. He often described his job as mostly prosecuting men for hurting their wives, girlfriends and children. Eventually, he decided to quit the law and went into real estate, founding his own real estate brokerage, Oregon First, which he grew to one of the largest in the state.

It was at Oregon First that Kenneth met and married his second wife, Mary Louise Monahan, over 27 years ago. With her, he shares four more children, 12 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren, all of whom he loved very much.

Kenneth was buried in a private ceremony at the same cemetery as both his sets of grandparents. He will be greatly missed for his sense of humor; his desire to learn from others and to share his knowledge with them; his commitment to doing the right thing, even when it’s difficult; and most of all, his kindness.

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Ernilie Storrs obituary

Gladys Ernilie Burgess Storrs July 17, 1924 to April 16, 2017

Gladys Enilie Burgess Storrs July 17, 1924 to April 16, 2017

Gladys Ernilie Burgess Storrs was born on July 17, 1924 in Tacoma, WA. She never used her first name; 5 minutes after she came home to Puyallup, her three big brothers decided her name was Ernie. And it stuck.

Ernie worked in Seattle at Boeing Field during WWII and met her husband James Storrs while traveling from Puyallup to Seattle on the bus. They dated until he was shipped to the South Pacific and married soon after his return. They settled in Newberg, Oregon until about 1958 when they moved to Garden Home.

Ernie was very active with Home Extension as well as a quilting group that met at the local church. She just recently was presented with her 59 year pin for Extension. Quite an honor. She made a number of quilts for the new babies  of friends and other lucky folks, and also finished several quilts that had been pieced by her mother and grandmother.

She was an active member of the Hillsdale Community Church, United Church of Christ and took great enjoyment in attending various functions there.

She passed away suddenly and unexpectedly in the early hours of Easter Sunday leaving behind her daughter Lori Snyder (Kevan), and son Brian Storrs.

A Celebration of Life was held at the church. She is interred at Willamette Cemetery with her beloved Jim. Donations in Remembrance could be made to the American Cancer Society or the Al Kader Shriners Ladder of Smiles.

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Mary Helen Himes Koeber

1932 Mary Helen Himes, Lincoln High School graduation. Courtesy Mary Helen Himes Koeber. See post.

1932 Mary Helen Himes, Lincoln High School graduation.
Courtesy Mary Helen Himes Koeber. See post.

Mary Helen Himes Koeber (1913-2017)

[Update: Mary Helen passed away on May 7, 2017. She was a beautician and opened the first beauty shop in Beaverton. She attended Garden Home and Hillsboro grade schools, graduating from Lincoln High School in Portland. Her grandfather was George Himes, one of the original curators of the Oregon Historical Society.

She is survived by her sister Grace (Himes) McInnis and her sons Ivan, George and Robert Koeber. Also numerous grandchildren, great grandchildren, nephews and nieces. A memorial was held in Himes Park on Terwilliger Boulevard.]

Centenarian Mary Helen Himes (born Sept. 28, 1913) and her mother Vera L. Prince Himes (died 1988) and father Claridge Holcomb Himes (died in accident 1927) moved to Garden Home for two years in about 1919 to 1921. She lived on Royal Avenue (71st now) along with her siblings George Richard, Claridge Holcomb, and Grace Emma on an acre plot. She attended first and second grade at Garden Home School. Her teacher was Mary Lehman. A neighbor Evelyn Simpkins Biles lived across the street.

Her father, Claridge H. Himes took the Oregon Electric into Portland to work at the Fleischner-Mayer, a dry goods store in today’s Old Town. This store was built in 1906 and stands today at 115 NW First Avenue, Portland. He later worked at the Meier & Frank (now Macy’s) retail store. Her mother, Vera Prince Himes, raised the children and taught piano.

Hairdresser: In 1923, the Himes family moved to Hillsboro. They were lucky to have one car during the Depression. “Dad would take the car to work and everyone else walked everywhere.”  Mary Helen graduated from Lincoln High School. In those days when you graduated from high school, if you weren’t going to college, you went to California. Two of her siblings went there and she spent a few years in San Francisco and liked the city.

After graduation, Mary Helen went to Sanitary Beauty School for six months and $50 and then passed the State Board examination to be a hairdresser. She had a salon in her home after she was married and came to know lots of the early residents in the area.

Pioneer families: Although Mary Helen will be 100 on Sept. 28, 2013 she lives independently in Beaverton. She appreciates the help that her sons George, Robert, and Ivan Ted Koeber provide. Mary Helen’s family and relatives were important early pioneers of the area and are illustrative of the contributions of our early families.

Tyrus and Emeline Himes were  Mary Helen’s paternal great grandparents. George H. Himes, her grandfather, has the middle name of Holcomb, the maiden name of his mother Emeline Holcomb Himes, from the very early and distinguished Holcomb family, pilgrim settlers of 1635.  George’s parents  Tyrus, b. 1818,d. 1879, and Emeline Himes, b. 1821, began their journey west in 1853 with their four children and horse and ox teams. They experienced many hardships including loss of stock and limited provisions. Their wagon train of thirty-six wagons and seventy-five people crossed the Natchez Pass (Nevada) over an undeveloped trail and finally arrived in Olympia, Washington in 1853.

George Holcomb Himes: Mary Helen’s paternal grandfather George H. Himes as a young man worked in rail making, wood cutting and other labors in clearing land on his parent’s donation land claim east of Olympia. Although he had limited education, he aspired to learn the printing trade and began at the Washington Standard, a paper published in Olympia. After his apprenticeship, he moved down to The Oregonian in Portland and in 1870 began his own business “Himes, the Printer.” In 1898 George was a founding member of the Oregon Historical Society and the first and long-time curator.

George Holcomb Himes, b. 5-18-1844, d. 1940, married Anna F. Riggs, d. 1933, from Eola, a small community west of Salem, and raised 5 daughters and one son Claridge H. Himes. Anna’s family came to Portland in 1859 by steamer from New York and settled on a ranch in Eola, west of Salem, Polk County. A family notation says “Grandpa met Anna at the ranch while stopping for dinner in 1865.  He was 23 when married and she was 17 or 18.” George and Anna had 11 children, eight of which survived: Edna Emeline, Sarah Myrtle, Mary, Grace Helen, Claridge Holcomb (father of Mary Helen), Mildred Florence, Fay Celestial and Lurah Margaret.

OHS Curator: George H. Himes is honored as one of the founding members of the Oregon Historical Society and was the first curator, a position he held for over 54 years. A Portland city park along SW Terwilliger Boulevard bears his name as did the Liberty ship George H. Himes. In 1943 the ship was built in the Oregon shipyards for World War II in the amazing time of 28 days.  It was torpedoed in Guadalcanal and finally scrapped in 1964.  His extensive documents, papers and diaries are archived at the Oregon Historical Society. “A dedicated diarist, he kept a daily record of his life, beginning at the age of fourteen and continuing until his death at ninety-five.” 1

Slavin family: Mary Helen’s father Claridge Holcomb Himes, 7-7-1881 to 1927 married her mother, Vera Prince, who died in 1988. Vera’s father is Richard C. Prince, pictured.   Vera’s mother, Mary Slavin Prince, was from the early pioneer family of John A. Slavin. John Slavin started for California in 1850 but ended up buying his way down the Columbia in a small boat provided he would pull one oar. 2  John married Emma Ross in 1852.

They took a donation land claim at the corner of Clackamas, Washington and Multnomah counties. He built a cabin and large barn off of Slavin Road at what is now Capitol Highway and Sunset Boulevard, approximately in the location of the Hillsdale Library. Slavin Road was a major early road leading into Portland and a portion of it was changed to Capitol Highway.  Slavin Road continues in a multiple housing area just east of Barbur Boulevard near Hamilton.

In 1884 John and Emma Slavin enlarged the little house in the woods, building a good farm house. They had six children including Mary Slavin Prince, Mary Helen’s maternal grandmother.

John A. Slavin barn on Slavin Road. Courtesy Mary Helen Himes Koeber. See post.

John A. Slavin barn on Slavin Road.
Courtesy Mary Helen Himes Koeber. See post.

1884 residence of John and Emma Ruth Ross Slavin, Hillsdale. Courtesy Mary Helen Himes Koeber. See post.

1884 residence of John and Emma Ruth Ross Slavin, Hillsdale.
Courtesy Mary Helen Himes Koeber. See post.

Resources:

  • Photos from family
  • 1.  http://www.oregonencyclopedia.org/George Himes, written by Geoffrey Wexler
  • 2.  Illustrated History of Oregon/John A. Slavin
  • genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/infleischner
  • Rev.H.K. Hines. Illustrated History of the State of Oregon, 1893.  Lewis Publishing Company.
  • http://www.slavens.net/bios/john_a_slavin.htm
  • Portland Parks, George Himes Park Trail System
  • Thanks to Julie Bishop (Amy Northrop’s mom) Raz connection, to confirm location of Slavin barn, house.
  • Thanks to Katherine McDonald for October interview with Mrs. Koeber

By Elaine Shreve, 2013

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Patricia Joanne James Gossett obituary

Patricia Joanne James Gossett, August 6, 1931 to August 27, 2012

Pattijo was born at Emanuel Hospital to Leonard and Mary Huffsmith. She attended Ockley Green Grade School, Jefferson High and Lewis and Clark College, receiving her nursing degree at Emanuel Hospital. She is survived by her husband, Lane; her son and daughter-in-law, Kevin and Karin James of Seattle; daughter, Leslie Younger; grandson, Jacob Younger; great-grandchildren, Trinity and Tristan Gossett; and her loving extended family. She was predeceased by her brother, Jim Huffsmith. Pattijo’s career at Emanuel Hospital spanned 32 years. She then taught for five years at the College of Legal Arts. She was a member of the Emanuel Hospital School of Nursing Alumni Association, the Association of Volunteer Registered Nurses and was a regular attendee at the Good Friends Club luncheon. In retirement, she did what she’d always done – looked out for people, volunteering at Emanuel and Ronald McDonald House. She was a lover of life, keeper of the faith, follower of the rainbow, believer in good, guardian of those in need and a friend to all. Pattijo was one of a kind. A service will be held at Lewis and Clark College in the Agnes Flanagan Chapel on Sunday, Sept. 16, 2012 at 2 p.m. with a reception following. In lieu of flowers, please honor Pattijo with a contribution to Ronald McDonald House.

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Delores Jarvis obituary

Delores Jarvis, January 11, 1930 to November 4, 2017

Delores Jarvis (1930-2017)

Delores was born Jan. 11, 1930, the first child of George and Dora Olson of Warren, Ore. She died of complications from Parkinson’s disease Nov. 4, 2017 at her home of 58 years in Garden Home with family and friends at her side.

Delores was a gifted vocalist who sang with a trio in a swing band at events in the Portland/Vancouver areas. She was also quite the beauty, representing Columbia County in the Miss Oregon Pageant.

John Jarvis “Jack” and Delores were married in 1954. Five years later they purchased their property in Garden Home where they would raise their four children.

In the early ’60s Delores was invited by a childhood friend to a new church they were starting. She attended the first service of West Hills Covenant which was held in the parsonage.

On Jan. 4, 1971 Jack died of Melanoma leaving her with their four children ranging in age from five to 11. She leaned into her relationship with God along with her vibrant church community to sustain herself and her kids.

Following Jack’s death Delores began working full-time for Beaverton Schools cafeteria services. She did this until she retired in 1992.

Delores’ home was open to all and created a safe haven of encouragement for many to grow in. Her children were raised with community surrounding them because of the rich relationships that Delores cultivated.

Delores was prayerful, intentional, decisive, wise and humble. She loved her life and those she shared it with. She was a friend to everyone that she met and was consistently present in every moment.

She leaves a legacy of joy that was uncontainable. It permeated everything she did.
Delores is survived by her sister, Lois (Gaylon) Bledsoe; children, Andrea Jarvis, Lisa (Mike) Leslie, David (Jill) Jarvis, Dana (Steve) Nasralla; 10 grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; Wayne and Ruth Smith, and many other friends.

A memorial celebration will be held at 2 p.m., Dec. 2, 2017, at West Hills Covenant Church 5815 S.W. Gillcrest Ct., Portland, OR 97221

Donations to the West Hills Covenant church deacon fund are welcome.

This obituary appeared in The Oregonian, November 2017 (source). Used with permission from Jarvis family.

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Log cabins of Garden Home

There are several log cabins in Garden Home:

  • Fogelbo (Foglequist residence) on SW Oleson Road
  • Stefanicgrimbso residence on SW Garden Home Road
  • George residence on SW 87th Avenue
  • Two on (or near) SW Florence Lane (which we have not yet investigated)

Fogelbo log cabin

Fogelbo is located at 8740 SW Oleson Road, nestled on a couple acres of mature trees, shrubs and flowers. It is called Fogelbo (bird nest) which is derived from the family name of Fogelquist. Henry Steiner built the log cabin in the late 1930s and it was purchased by the Fogelquists in 1952. Steiner worked on Timberline Lodge and built other well-known Steiner cabins on Mt. Hood.

Fogelbo has become a center of Swedish and Scandinavian culture and activities. The New Sweden Cultural Heritage Soceity is next door. The blue and yellow Swedish flag flies on the front flagpole. Washington County designated Fogelbo as a historical site in 1978.  Fogelbo has hosted hundreds of events over the years and thousands of people have enjoyed the home and hospitality and learned something about the Swedish culture.

Stefanicgrimbso log cabin

Melissa and Joshua Stefanicgrimsbo purchased property at 8550 SW Garden Home Road in 2009. They were told by the realtor that the original room was built in 1930 and additions made later. The original room is the log cabin made with 10” logs. The well-house out back still has the pumping equipment. The garage probably was a smallish barn. Mrs. Herzog, the former neighbor to the west, said this was the original farm home for the filbert orchard in this area. Another neighbor, Judy George, lives in a 1900 log cabin home on SW 87th Avenue.

Bob Feldman grew up in the 1940s on the Fanno Creek Dairy at SW 88th Avenue and SW Garden Home Road. He remembers:

In the 1930s, the log cabin at 8550 SW Garden Home Road was called the Hamilton place although Mr. Hamilton was commonly called “Snoose.”  He was a very large man and a musician playing the accordion and other instruments.

Bob thinks that a Brown family owned the land before that.

George log cabin

Judy George lives in the oldest house on the portion of 87th going south to Alden from Garden Home Road.  Judy agrees with the County records which state that the home was  built in 1900.  Judy understood that the original house was a one room log cabin, possibly her current dining room.  The walls in the living room are knotty pine which has, over time, darkened so beautifully.  A well-built fireplace is on one wall and a beautiful stovepipe flue cover is on the opposite wall, near the ceiling where it would be used for a cook stove or heating stove. The back porch bears witness to the log cabin construction of the house.  The logs were not peeled of their bark and the bark has slowly eroded over time.  The chinks between the logs are visible in the photographs.

The exterior of the home has been sided over.  Decorative faux log siding covers the north exterior wall.

 

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November 2017 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find over a hundred stories and over a thousand photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Rainbow over the Garden Home Recreation center – photo by Jill Vaughan, 2017

Upcoming Events

Garden Home recipe books

Saturday, December 2, Holiday Bazaar, 9-4:  Look for us in room 7 of Garden Home Rec. Center.  We’ll have historic recipe treats all ready for your holiday baking! And free treats and bookmarks. We always enjoy meeting Garden Home people.

News

This fall we enjoyed a September presentation on Garden Home through the DecadesThis slide show of work by PCC student Spenser Kuroda features the building history of Garden Home since 1950. Tom Shreve presented this and reference material to an appreciative audience. Spenser’s report can be found on our Resources page.

Our October 9 program, Show and Tell from your family or a Garden Home treasure  brought out some interesting items. Cheryl Clark brought a selection of old bottles she retrieved from what seemed to be an old garbage dump near SW 92nd and Fanno Creek. Anyone else remember this garbage dump? Another find was a secreted old report card, reporting on student bad behavior, presumably hidden from parent eyes!

Other News

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had 5 thirty-minute slide presentations last year from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. March 13 will be a special meeting for the public with refreshments and summaries by the Chair and the Treasurer. The plans for the year’s activities will be shared. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Get your Historic Garden Home t-shirt now for just $14 for small to XL. Larger XXL and XXXL sizes are $17. There is an additional charge of $9 to mail your shirt. They’re fun! Available at the Garden Home Market Place.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

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Fanno family biography

Fanno is an important name here in our southwest Portland community. The Fanno Creek Trail follows the historic Oregon Electric Railroad track bed that crosses Fanno Creek. The trail then connects to the Tualatin Hills Park and Recreation District’s (THPRD) path which leads to Greenway Park, adjacent to the Fanno Farmhouse at 8405 SW Creekside Place, Beaverton, OR 97008. This is the oldest existing house in the city of Beaverton and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Fanno Farmhouse, owned and maintained by THPRD, can be found by turning south off of Hall Boulevard at Creekside Place, the street just west of Nimbus. The house was designed and constructed by Augustus Fanno in 1859 and was occupied by the Fanno family until 1979. The house was built with sawn lumber from Thomas H. Denney’s local sawmill, Rebecca Denney Fanno’s brother.

Augustus Fanno: The “first” Augustus Fanno was born on March 26, 1804 in Maine. His father John Fanno and family had emigrated from France during the French Revolution of 1790s. This Augustus was married to Martha Ferguson in 1838. They came West with their five year old son Eugene in one of the earliest wagon trains in 1846. Martha (and baby) died shortly upon arrival during childbirth in Linn City (now West Linn). Augustus (and possibly son Eugene) explored the territory on west of the Willamette to the coast and staked his donation land claim of 640 acres in 1847. This area came to be known as the Tualatin Valley, home to the Kalapuya Indians. The Indians had camped and fished for years in this area before disease and new exclusion laws decimated their welfare.

Augustus then married Rebecca Jane Denney in 1851. Her family had joined with a number of other families from the same neighborhood in southern Indiana. Some of these historic names are familiar today: Denney, Stott, Tucker, and McKay.

The first Augustus Fanno had served at sea for a number of years and then taught school in Missouri. In Oregon, he drained some of the beavers’ swampy land and farmed the eastern yellow Danvers onion by careful selection of bulbs over a period of twenty years, until he developed an onion which would keep in the damp climate. He was known to be honest and industrious and welcomed new settlers to provide children for a school. He was the first deputy sheriff appointed to Washington County and director of the local school.

Children: Augustus’ and Rebecca’s children who reached adulthood included boys Augustus and Alonzo and girls Zantaphine and Ziona . This second Augustus married Kate Guerin and had one child, Helen. Alonzo’s son Frank began a line of Fanno men continuing today with Dwight Fanno of Eagle Creek (story below) and his sons including Peter Rutherford Fanno, U.S. Navy. Many persons of the Fanno family are buried in the Crescent Grove Cemetery on Greenburg Road just south of Garden Home (see list).

Augustus and Rebecca’s sons Augustus and his brother Alonzo continued with the onion farming. Family lore remembers that this Augustus enjoyed the moniker “Onion King” and printed up cards which he handed out on the street. Other sources say that the Onion King title was given to the first Augustus. Family stories tell of the onion shipments to the Klondike gold rush of 1898 in the Yukon area. Some documents refer to the California gold rush of 1848 which would have been early in the onion cultivation farming.

Eugene Fanno, by greatgrandson Robert Fanno: As an adult, Eugene, the son of the first marriage whose mother died, became known in the local family as a “Mountain Man” and later lived in California where his son established the Fanno Saw Works. We talked with Robert Fanno of Chico, California, the current owner of the Fanno Saw Works and a direct descendant of the first Augustus Fanno. Robert is the son of Carl Fanno 1911-1976, who was the son of Asa Augustus Fanno who was the son of Eugene Fanno.

Fanno Saw Works logo

Eugene Fanno had four children including Eugene, Jr., Asa Augustus, Lena and two more. Eugene seems to have been somewhat estranged from the original family, worked in the Oregon coast range woods in the Valsetz area of Oregon where there is a Fanno Ridge and Fanno Peak Road. Asa Augustus Fanno, Robert’s grandfather, was a mill wright on a paddle boat and worked in boat building. He settled in Chico, California about 1900 and soon purchased an almond orchard. His first saws and long pole pruners were used on the nut trees and he developed the Fanno Saw Works.

Dwight Fanno: We were pleased to talk with Dwight Rutherford Fanno, a direct descendant of the original Augustus Fanno who first came to Oregon in 1846 and claimed his donation land claim in 1847 southwest of the the larger Garden Home area. This has been called the Progress area. This land claim of 640 acres was signed by Abraham Lincoln.

Dwight Fanno’s father was Norman Fanno 1932-2001, son of Frank Fanno 1902-1984, who was the son of Alonzo Fanno 1861-1949, the brother of Augustus Fanno 1855-1923 and who both shared in the inheritance of the Fanno farm and house. This Augustus and Alonzo were the sons of the original Augustus, 1804-1884, who came to Oregon in 1845 or 1846.

Dwight and his three siblings lived in the Fanno farmhouse, built in 1859, and farmed the remaining 85 acres with cattle and hay. The onion maggot had decimated the onion growing. During his early years, Dwight attended McKay School, Whitford Junior High and graduated from Beaverton High in 1974. He currently lives in the Estacada area where he has a home construction business. He consulted with his mother Gladys Fanno for some details of this story.

The Indians camped in an oak tree area NE of the Fanno farmhouse. Natural salt deposits in the soil attracted birds and animals. The first Augustus told about shooting deer from his front step. At one time, a research study on the large band-tailed pigeons was done in this area. This whole area of the previous farm is now occupied by businesses and family residences in addition to the Greenway Park along the Fanno Creek Trail. The area is subject to flooding and the beavers have returned to Fanno Creek in the Greenway area.

References:

Interview with Dwight Fanno, August 2017 by Elaine Shreve.

Telephone interview with Robert Fanno, Aug. 30, 2017 by Elaine Shrevce.

National Register of Historic Places Inventory Augustus Fanno Farmhouse, 1984.

Family documents provided by Judy Denney Donovan, 2017.

Matt Miner, Seen in the Vista Brook Park pond this morning: 2017, comment on Nextdoor Garden Home:

8:00am. One great blue heron standing in the center of the pond, circled by a small flotilla of baby ducks commanded by their mother, the admiral. Another heron, sitting off to the left, poking at the water looking for breakfast. A crow swoops in, squawking at the top of its lungs. Just then a coyote briefly steps out of the brush on the far side of the pond. A nature documentary right in your own back yard.

Books

Both books available through the Washington County Libraries:

Lindstrom, Eric L. (2012) Up Fanno Creek, Confessions of an Accidental Advocate. Printed by On Demand Books. In this fascinating book Dr. Lindstrom takes us along on his recent research into the history and realities of Fanno Creek and its tributaries. We learn of the Kalapuya Indians and their subgroup the Atfalati Indians who lived in our larger Garden Home and Tualatin area, the Missoula Floods, Fanno family life and our current concerns with the Portland sewage pump stations.

The author talks with our neighbors, investigates our streams and recalls his own early life in understanding the Fannos. The book explores the businesses, the people, the history, and the many factors affecting Fanno Creek and its tributaries in the middle of a highly developed city and suburbs. The two major tributaries are Ash Creek and Summer Creek. A wonderful resource.

Blowers, Joe (2000) “Fish Stories” The Historical Occurrence of Salmonids in the Fanno Creek Watershed Printed by 501 (c) (3) Fans of Fanno Creek, P.O. Box 25835, Portland, OR 97225. This report includes a map and an aerial photo of middle Fanno Creek. Many people experienced in identifying fish and habitat were interviewed and documented. At this 1999 research date, a steelhead was sighted in Fanno Creek at the Vista Brook Park by an employee of Oregon Fish and Wildlife. A chart documents the type of fish species seen in Fanno Creek over the last 50 years.

Virginia Mapes (1993) CHAKEIPI, The Place of the Beaver.  Published by City of Beaverton, Printed by Community Newspapers, Inc. Tigard, Oregon. This excellent well-researched book by our local historian covers the history of the Beaverton area and the early pioneers. Many photos, sketches, and maps. The story of Beaverton’s Bernard Airport in (now) downtown Beaverton reminds us how recent “history” has occurred.

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Steve Mapes obituary

Steve Mapes, February 18, 1942 to July 19, 2017

Steve Mapes, February 18, 1942 to July 19, 2017

Steve grew up in Garden Home and Tigard where he graduated from high school in 1960.  After studying at the University of Oregon and Portland State, he married Esta Anderson in 1965.  They moved back to Garden Home where they raised their two children, Kevin and Kelli.  Steve worked as a supervisor for the Portland Water Bureau, where he retired in 1998.

Steve was an avid runner, completing several marathons, cheering on the Ducks and Trail Blazers and supporting his children in their activities.  Steve and Esta traveled the world and loved returning to their beach house at Road’s End.  Steve was a wonderful community member and could always be counted on for Garden Home activities.  Memorials to Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

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Lucille E. Adams obituary

Lucille E. Adams, January 20, 1925 to August 10, 2017

Lucille E. Adams Jan 20, 1925 to Aug 10, 2017

Lucille was the wife of Culmer “John” Adams and shared in his history.  John’s grandparents lived on the north side of SW Garden Home Road just east of the Thriftway store property in the 1930s and ‘40s.

She attended Jefferson High School.  Early in their marriage they lost everything in the Vanport flood but moved on to raise their family in the Beaverton area.  She was preceded in death by her husband and siblings and survived by her children Susan, Cathleen,  and Jeffrey and their families.

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July 30, 2017 Ice Cream Social

Ice Cream Social, July 30, 2017 from 1:pm to 3:pm on a Sunday afternoon:  We had a wonderful time outside on the playground, under the new overhead cover, meeting our neighbors and friends and enjoying free ice cream cones. We had almost 150 people attend to chat with one another and peruse the historic displays and albums of Garden Home School children. The school closed in 1982, 35 years ago, the balloons on our poster being released that day. Thanks to chairpersons Patsy VandeVenter and Carole Vranizan who were assisted by members of the Garden Home History Project Board.

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May 21, 2017 Crescent Grove Cemetery Tour

We enjoyed our May 21 tour of early Garden Home pioneer graves at the Crescent Grove Cemetery. A beautiful day, four guides reviewed the histories of over two dozen of our brave pioneers, most of whom came out on the Oregon trail. Our tour guides were Mark Kajatani, Janice Logan, Susan Houseman, and Elaine Shreve. Judy and Dan Donovan appeared in pioneer costume and spoke about the Denny family.

Thanks to all our volunteers and tour attendees!

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August 2017 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find over a hundred stories and over a thousand photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

Garden Home structures by decade of appearance.

Monday, September 11, 6:30 PM: 30-minute slide presentation on maps by PCC students about Garden Home buildings by decade. All are invited to the Board meeting following at 7:00 PM.

Monday, October 9, 6:30 PM: 30-minute slide presentation, topic TBA. All are invited to the Board meeting following at 7:00 PM.

Sunday, November 12, 1 to 3:00 PM: Veterans Celebration honoring attending veterans and Color Guard presentation.

Saturday, December 2: Come visit our table at the annual holiday bazaar at the Garden Home Recreation Center.

Sunday, December 10, 3 to 7 PM: Holiday party. Details to be announced.

News

We held an Ice Cream Social on Sunday, July 30, 2017. We had a wonderful time outside on the playground, under the new overhead cover, meeting our neighbors and friends and enjoying free ice cream cones. We had almost 150 people attend to chat with one another and peruse the historic displays and albums of Garden Home School children. The school closed in 1982, 35 years ago, the balloons on our poster being released that day. Thanks to chairpersons Patsy VandeVenter and Carole Vranizan who were assisted by members of the Garden Home History Project Board.

We enjoyed our May 21 tour of early Garden Home pioneer graves at the Crescent Grove Cemetery. A beautiful day, four guides reviewed the histories of over two dozen of our brave pioneers, most of whom came out on the Oregon trail. Thanks to all our volunteers and tour attendees!

Facebook:  Ginny Mapes has created a facebook group about Garden Home History.  She edited the student project, Garden Home – the way it was which was published in 1980 by the Beaverton School District.  Ms. Mapes was the librarian at Garden Home School and then moved on to Greenway School where she and Jill MacWilliam authored another book, Traces of the Past, about the history of that area and included more stories on Garden Home.  Both of these books are available for in-library use at the Garden Home Community Library and they both can be checked out through any Washington County Library (with your library card).

facebook.com/Garden-Home-the-way-it-was-881298175303220

Other News

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had 5 thirty-minute slide presentations last year from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. March 13 will be a special meeting for the public with refreshments and summaries by the Chair and the Treasurer. The plans for the year’s activities will be shared. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Our 2016 activities included seven slideshow and speaker presentations:

  • February, Tom Shreve presented 1950’s aerial photos of Garden Home
  • March, Pat Dignan presented early photos and family life in the Hunt Club area.
  • April, Virginia Vanture presented on the Century Homes
  • May, Colin Lamb presented on history of early Thriftway, shopping center.
  • June, Elaine Shreve slideshow Garden Components and review of History & Garden Tour
  • October, Tom Shreve presented 1903 story of Murder on ‘the Garden Home Road’
  • November, Tom Shreve presented his favorite photos of Garden Home area.

2016 Events:

  • June 4, the History and Garden Tour, done with the Garden Home Gardeners.
  • August 13, outdoor Reunion of Garden Home School and Beaverton High students
  • Nov. 5, Bell Ringing at Garden Home Market, old church bell
  • Dec. 3, Participation in Bazaar, sell handmade ornaments, bookmarks
  • Dec. 12, Party at Shreve home.

Board of Directors, Garden Home History Project, 2016:

Chair: Elaine Shreve
Vice-Chair: Janice Logan
Secretary: Patsy VandeVenter
Treasurer: Marie Pacella

Board Members: (voting) John Pacella, Stan and Susan Houseman, Sasha Kaplan, Carole Vranizan, Louise Cook Jones, Bob and Delia Day, Mark Kajitani (Served for partial term:  Christina Mauroni, Ginny McCarthy)

Advisory Board:  Serving the project with special skills, services or resources: Bob & Sharon Cram, Tom Shreve, Virginia Vanture, Jan Fredrickson

2017 presentations and events will be planned at February 13 meeting.

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Get your Historic Garden Home t-shirt now for just $14 for small to XL. Larger XXL and XXXL sizes are $17. There is an additional charge of $9 to mail your shirt. They’re fun! Available at the Garden Home Market Place.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

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History of the Alpenrose Dairy

Alpenrose Dairy (year unkown)

Alpenrose Dairy (year unkown)

Alpenrose is the oldest family-owned dairy in Oregon. It was named after a flower in Switzerland, where McKinnon’s family lived before moving to Oregon over 100 years ago.

Located off Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway at 6149 S.W. Shattuck Road, the dairy has long offered many facilities and activities more closely associated with public parks, including the most steeply banked bicycle Velodrome track in the region, a quarter-mile oval track for go-kart racing, and baseball fields where Little League World Series girl’s games have been played for the past 23 years.

Tracey Cadonau McKinnon’s grandfather, Carl Cadonau Sr., started Dairyville in the 1950s to provide wholesome recreation for families after church. The buildings, which increased in number over the years, look like a cowboy movie set. Original activities included pony rides, kite-racing, and frog-jumping, pie-eating and cow-milking contests. Visitors also enjoyed the challenge of climbing a pole covered with bacon fat, where those who made it to the top could earn a silver dollar.

Alpenrose Dairy’s roots run deep in the community. Back when most of Southwest Portland was farmland, Florian Cadonau began to deliver milk to downtown Portland in 1891 with his young son, Henry, who opened the dairy in 1916 with his wife, Rosina.

Originally located at Southwest 45th Avenue and Vermont Street, it moved to its current location after a catastophic fire. Henry’s son, Carl Sr., joined the business after returning from World War II in 1946, and his son, Carl Cadonau Jr., later joined him. The senior Cadonau ran the dairy until his death in 2004. The dairy currently is managed by Cadonau Jr. and Rod Birkland, both great-grandsons of Florian Cadonau.

The dairy did not set out to become a community center. According to Carl Jr., when he and Rod were growing up, they and their brothers would play ball near their grandmother’s rose garden. After trampling some of the plants, she told Henry to build the kids their own ball field. A local Little League saw it and soon was playing games there. Dugouts, lights and a scoreboard were added over the next few years. After a couple more fields popped up, the dairy gained a reputation for having excellent facilities, eventually hosting the Little League Softball World Series games that are broadcast every year on ESPN.

More sports facilities followed, including the Quarter Mile midget track (go-karts) in the 1950s, a dirt-surfaced bicycle track in 1962, and the Velodrome in 1967. The facility began hosting national competitions just two years later.

At one point, the dairy also had between 80 and 100 Shetland ponies that would be taken to grocery stores for pony rings and wagon rides. McKinnon says rides also were offered at the dairy in the first building of what became Dairyville.

Today, the dairy is a different business than it once was. In the past, as many as 250 cows were on the property. Early deliveries were made around the city by horse and wagon. Now, Alpenrose gets its milk from a co-op that includes approximately 100 farms in the state. Processing is done at a modern plant at the dairy, from which products are then distributed.

But, despite the changes, Alpenrose still gives back to the community by opening its doors to visitors and staging such signature events as one of the largest Easter egg hunts in the country.  It is opened every Sunday afternoon during the 2017 summer. Free.

Adapted by Elaine Shreve from the Portland Tribune story of June 2, 2017, written by Jim Redden.  This story used with author permission 6-2-17. Visit http://cni.pmgnews.com/pt/361371  for the full original story and photos (Pamplin Media Group).

[Editor: After we published the above story, Doc Hickman called with more details, below.]

Doc Hickman: Remembering Alpenrose and early life in Garden Home.

After a fire at the Elco Dairy on Shattuck Road, Alpenrose purchased the Elco acres and moved from its original location at SW 45th and Vermont.

Stan Marugg was hit by a car up at Alpenrose, broke his arm, successfully sued the dairy.

Doc worked in hauling a thousand tons of alfalfa baled hay from a farm at Goldendale, WA.  It was used to feed the large herd of milk cows at the dairy.

Pete Gertsch farmed with horses in the early part of the 1900’s.  After WW II, he bought a small tractor.  Alfalfa was the major feed for cows, besides pastures.  It could be cut and stacked 2-4 times in a year.

Doc also worked for the Schallberger’s dairy farm on Scholls Ferry Road near the Raleigh Hills intersection. The testing of milk was a complicated and expensive procedure in that day. The untested and thoroughly clean milk had to be sold as “dog milk.” On this farm, they rigged up a system of dog milk in big cans where one could drain the amount of milk they needed into a container and then choose to use it for dogs or to drink for the family. People paid by an honor system.

From our Doc Hickman story:

In 1948 at the time of the great Vanport flood in north Portland, Mrs. Schallberger had gone to Switzerland to visit family. One of the family members had taken a nice photo of the dairy farm to send her but then forgot to turn the dial to move the photo on to the next space on the camera. Another picture of the terrible Vanport flood got overlaid on top of the Schallberger farm to present an alarming photo. They were afraid to send this photo to Switzerland fearing that it would be misinterpreted.  Addition:  When Mrs. Schallberger came home, she brought one of the large famous Swiss cowbells especially inscribed for the Alpenrose Dairy.

For more information about the history of the Alpenrose Dairy, visit:

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Photos from the Washington County Museum

We recently acquired a trove of historical photos of Garden Home courtesy of the Washington County Museum. We’re still working on stories for some of these photos, but we’re too exicited about them to not share them immediately.

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T. E. Hills (U.S. Civil War veteran)

Chas. Jocobs, Emily E. Hills, E. E. Beebe, Alice A. Beebe, T. E. Hills, Oct 5, 1922 in Garden Home

(L to R) Chas. Jocobs, Emily E. Hills, E. E. Beebe, Alice A. Beebe, T. E. Hills, Oct 5, 1922 in Garden Home

The name of Mr. T.E. Hills comes up in various accounts of early Garden Home. He lived in the older two-story blue house (Dickson home) on Oleson Road at Shirley Lane, 7730 SW Oleson Road, back in the early 1900s. His obituary says he lived in Garden Home from 1908 to 1941. At age 23 he married Emily Beebe in Illinois, who later taught at Garden Home School and then after Emily’s death, at age 80 he married her sister Alice who had lived with them. In 1909, T.E., Emily and Alice were listed as owners of 8 acres in Garden Home. T.E. died on Jan. 4, 1941 at age 96. (Mapes research and Mapes, Virginia: Garden Home – The Way It Was, 1980)

The book Conversations with Pioneer Men by Fred Lockley and compiled by Mike Helm identifies the T.E. Hills name to be Theophilus E. Hills. That book, published in 1996, contained extensive early interviews by Lockley. Theophilus is quoted in the book: “I was 17 when I enlisted in Company 1, 34th Illinois, as a drummer. We were with the 2nd Division of the 14th Corps and I went with Sherman to the sea. I enlisted in August, 1861, for three years, and reenlisted at the end of that period. Shiloh was our first battle. Most of the members of our company were young chaps—from 17 to about 21 years of age.”

T.E. Hills recounts his time in the Union army and the Battle of Stone River where he was eventually captured and later able to flee into a plum thicket and get back to his Union company. As a prisoner, he was ordered to take care of the wounded. After another battle as a Union soldier, he surveyed the battleground and found “his bunkie” badly injured. He carried this man to the ambulance and he lived to fight again.

Dorothy Upchurch (parents owned the White store, 1930s and 40s, current DQ property) writes in her memoirs:

“On the other side of our property was the T.E. Hills Victorian farmhouse. An orchard of filberts separated our places. We were fascinated by “Old Man Hills” as my father called him. He was a Civil War veteran, had a flagpole with brass cannon on the top and ran the flag up and down every day. I can still see him in the Memorial Day parade in his navy blue Union uniform with brass buttons, a campaign hat with a gold cord on his head. He also drove a spit and polished 1909 Ford. Quite a curiosity in the 20s when he drove it to Portland, it drew quite a crowd with its polished brass headlights and struts to the windshield from the fenders. It was in such a beautiful condition that Henry Ford offered to buy it and to put it in his Dearborn Museum and trade a new Mercury for it. Mr. Hill agreed, received the new car, drove it for a time and then demanded his old Ford back, and got it.”

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May 2017 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find over a hundred stories and over a thousand photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

May 8, 6:30 – 7:00 pm, Garden Home Recreation Center, 7475 SW Oleson Road, free: Thirty-minute slide show presentation about two historic local cemeteries, Crescent Grove Cemetery and the Scholls Ferry Cemetery and some of our notable early pioneers of the area. Learn about Dr. Henry Roe Cloud, once called the “most important living Indian” and his “Mother of the Year” wife. See how cemeteries continue to tell the stories of our families and our histories. Join us to learn about your community!

May 21, 2-3:30 pm, Crescent Grove Cemetery, 9925 SW Greenburg Road (next to Washington Square): Join us for a Sunday afternoon tour of graves of local pioneers and notable names in our early history.  Tigard, Greenburg, Fanno, Denney, and Oleson are just a few of the names. Wear comfortable shoes, bring an umbrella if indicated. Donation of $5 appreciated. You’ll hear wonderful stories of our early history.  Park down by the mausoleum at this beautiful historic Crescent Grove Cemetery.

News

The historic Partlow-Kickbush home on SW 78th Avenue has been demolished to make way for new construction. We don’t have details yet on the new construction.

Thanks to Stan Houseman for an excellent presentation on the history of Rummer homes at our last history project meeting.

Thanks to Washington County Museum for their March display of Garden Home photos and memoribilia. They continue to feature other communities each month. Go visit them in Hillsboro.

New stories on the website

We have a new memoir by Don Krom recounting his experiences living in Garden Home since the 1940s and his recollections of the people and places of Garden Home past.

We have a new story about Dorothy McNamara Bastien and her writing group in Garden Home in the 1940s.

We have a new story about T. E. Hills, a veteran of the US Civil War that lived in Garden Home. T. E. Hills lived in Garden Home from 1908 until his death at age 96 in 1941.

Slightly older stories on the website


We updated the the story about Leona Whitney to include new details about her popular chalkboard messages at the road by the Whitney’s Cannery, now the Old Market Pub.  We also updated the story about the Garden Home Cooperative Cannery to describe how it was first built over in the Progress shopping center and then built in Garden Home for its first birthday. Besides memberships, one of the co-op’s first fund raising events was a school carnival.

Warren Cook contributed an article about the Blue Bus service, owned by the Tualatin Valley Bus Company, that served the Garden Home area prior to acquisition by TriMet in 1970.

1903 Halloween Murder on the Garden Home Road! We previously posted a story about the other Garden Home road discussing how the moniker of Garden Home road used to refer to the route of SW Broadway Drive to SW Patton Road to SW Shattuck Road to SW Oleson Road. We discovered this fact when we stumbled across a story about the 1903 Halloween fatal shooting of Adolph Burkhardt on “the Garden Home road” by Samuel Bauman. This new story is the follow-up describing the details of slaying, the feud between two farmers that precipitated the killing, the mystery about where Adolph Burkhardt was killed, and the subsequent unusual capital murder trial proceedings.

We have a new story about Mr. Lumen H. Nichols, the first postmaster of Garden Home in the 1880s and 1890s. His store and post office are believed to have been on the SE corner of the intersection.

Heart Valve Research in Garden Home A retired engineer, M. Lowell Edwards, continued his lifelong research on valves and pumps by building an artificial heart here in the low industrial building (now Power Plumbing) on the western end of Multnomah Blvd.  He was soon connected to Dr. Albert Starr and began groundbreaking work on heart valves. Your editor received one!

Other News

You are invited to our very active Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had 5 thirty-minute slide presentations last year from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Our 2016 activities included seven slideshow and speaker presentations:

  • February, Tom Shreve presented 1950’s aerial photos of Garden Home
  • March, Pat Dignan presented early photos and family life in the Hunt Club area.
  • April, Virginia Vanture presented on the Century Homes
  • May, Colin Lamb presented on history of early Thriftway, shopping center.
  • June, Elaine Shreve slideshow Garden Components and review of History & Garden Tour
  • October, Tom Shreve presented 1903 story of Murder on ‘the Garden Home Road’
  • November, Tom Shreve presented his favorite photos of Garden Home area.

2016 Events:

  • June 4, the History and Garden Tour, done with the Garden Home Gardeners.
  • August 13, outdoor Reunion of Garden Home School and Beaverton High students
  • Nov. 5, Bell Ringing at Garden Home Market, old church bell
  • Dec. 3, Participation in Bazaar, sell handmade ornaments, bookmarks
  • Dec. 12, Party at Shreve home.

 

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Get your Historic Garden Home t-shirt now for just $14 for small to XL. Larger XXL and XXXL sizes are $17. There is an additional charge of $9 to mail your shirt. They’re fun! Available at the Garden Home Market Place.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

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Dorothy McNamara Bastien and her writing group in Garden Home in the 1940s.

Dorothy McNamara Bastien, 1906-1985, and her husband Clarence lived in Garden Home in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s. Their home is now painted yellow and blue and is the first single family home, 7665 SW Oleson, south of the intersection, on the west side. Her sister Harriet Krom and family moved to Garden Home from Wisconsin in the 1950s.

Bastien home - 7665 SW Oleson

Bastien home – 7665 SW Oleson

According to Don Krom, his aunt Dorothy Bastien had a writing group in the 1930s which included Peg Bracken who wrote about women’s issues and humor and Charlotte Goldsmith whose husband flew in WWI and WWII. She wrote stories about the war and airplanes for the Saturday Evening Post and other publications. Dorothy Bastien wrote for Scholastic and also wrote books and novels.

In several articles about her son Jim Bastien, Dorothy is listed as a writer and a teacher of Latin and journalism. Her book LORI is dedicated to “Jane, Jim, Lisa and Lori.” Jim Bastien married Jane Smisor and is survived by his two daughters, both piano teachers, Lisa and Lori. Dorothy Bastien was born March 14, 1906 and died May 1, 1985. Bob Day recalls that she also wrote for the Saturday Evening Post.

The James Bastien obituary by Margalit Fox concludes with:

Mr. Bastien married Jane Smisor in 1961. They had met a few months earlier, over Prokofiev’s Seventh Sonata, and were soon performing as a duo-piano team.

Besides his wife, Mr. Bastien is survived by the couple’s two daughters, Lisa Bastien Hanss of Manhattan, and Lori Bastien Vickers of La Jolla, both piano teachers who have collaborated with their mother on many recent books; and by four grandchildren.

Peg Bracken was another member of the writing group. Peg married in the 1940s and moved to Portland, Oregon, where she worked as an advertising copywriter along with Homer Groening, father of Matt Groening.

During the 1960s and 1970s, Bracken’s writing reassured women that they did not have to be perfect to have a happy, well-managed home which resulted in her The I Hate to Cook Book. Her daughter updated her On Getting Old for the First Time in 2010 after her mother died.

Ms. Bracken died in 2007 at the age of 89 and is survived by her fourth husband, John Ohman, whom she married in 1991 and three stepchildren including Jack Ohman (Oregonian editorial cartoonist many years) of Portland.

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Don Krom memoir

My parents were George and Harriet McNamara Krom.  My family moved from Wisconsin to Garden Home in 1946 when I was 3 years old.  We bought the house on 7 acres of fruit orchard which was located on the NE corner of the intersection of Garden Home Road and Oleson Road, now Shari’s restaurant. Other corners were occupied by the Garden Home School, Gust Johnson’s gas station and Throckmorton’s store (Dairy Queen now).   About 1950 our home was moved to 7770 SW Oleson Road, where a small business has been located. Roy Floyd lived next door.  My folks moved to Garden Home because my mother’s sister, Dorothy Bastien, lived here.

Don attended Garden Home School, 1st grade through the 8th grade and then Beaverton High School for 1957-1961.

I remember when Al and Mike Dardis and I were cutting up confetti to celebrate when Dorothy Johnson was in the Miss America pageant.  We took the confetti to the gas station (her father owned) and threw it all around.  After her first runner-up win, the family took off out of here to Hollywood. Sold the station, thought they would make money off of Dorothy’s fame.  Then the Mobil station moved in there.

The lot on the NE corner was then vacant until my mother and the Reinhardt brothers built the shopping center (Lambs, Texaco station, etc.).  During this period of 1946-1960, Garden Home had a gas station, post office, barber shop, cannery, Hunt Club, store, several plant nurseries, Carlo Poutala’s Firlock Paint store (on 78th), etc.  The grocery store (Throckmorton’s) burned down in 1956.

For shopping, we drove to Multnomah, Tigard, Beaverton or Raleigh Hills or took the bus to downtown Portland.

All of my friends and I picked strawberries, beans or hops to make money in the summer.  Other times we caddied at the Portland Golf Club, babysat, mowed lawns, delivered newspapers or worked at Whitney’s Cannery.

A major organization was the Garden Home Community Church.  Major church activities for those of us in the 7th and 8th grades and high school included ski trips, swimming, coed softball teams.  Our basketball team was undefeated in 1960!

We were blessed with some outstanding teachers at Garden Home School:  Phil McGriff (band), Mrs. Lawrence, Mrs. Iris Poutala, and Mr. Polier.  Equally outstanding were parents who led Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, etc.   Such as Mrs. Grant, Mrs. Norris, Mrs. Peyton, Bob Fisher’s mom, Mrs. Whitney, Ann and Willard Johnson and Mrs. Herzog.

Garden Home had many artists, musicians and writers at this time.  Ward Hawkins, Dorothy Bastien (writer), Joe Dardis (orchestra), Erich Porshman (sculpture,artist), Willard and Ann Johnson (artists, parents of Goody and Holly) , Jim Bastien (piano pedagogue) and L.Ron Hubbard (writer science fiction) .  Erich Porshman played the cello and was a wonderful artist.  I took lessons from him.  He also repaired my mother’s washing machine on the side.  Joe Dardis, the father of Al and Mike, had a big band and played all over the nation.  He was the singer.  He was also the head of the Music Union in the 1920s and 1930s.  Goody Johnson Cable (owns Rimsky Korsakoff Coffee House in Portland and with neighbor Sally Peyton Ford, the Sylvia Beach Hotel in Newport) grew up on Vermont and owned 10 acres up there.

In the 1930s Dorothy Bastien had a writing group which included Peg Bracken who wrote about women’s issues and humor, L. Ron Hubbard writing his science fiction, Charlotte Goldsmith whoe husband flew in WWI and WWII.  She wrote stories about the war and airplanes for the Saturday Evening Post and other publications.  Dorothy Bastien wrote for Scholastic and also wrote books and novels.

Jim Bastien, Aunt Dorothy’s son was a classical pianist.  He married Jane, lived in New Orleans and they both wrote piano books.  Most new piano learners are using piano books by Jim Bastien.  He died in 2005 and had a big obit featured in the NY Times.

I have lived and worked in Rhode Island, San Francisco, was in the Navy, had a wine store in Hillsdale and sold boats in Portland.  My family has extensive property in Georgia and Florida and we travel back and forth.  My son lives in Pittsburgh.  My wife’s name is Carol.

Interview and editing by Elaine Shreve, 2017

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