October 2018 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

November 10, 2018 Veterans Celebration

November 10, 2018 Veterans Celebration

 

Saturday, November 10, 1 to 3:45pm – Photos, interviews, historic displays, pie and coffee. Aloha Post 104, American Legion will “present the colors”. Sig Unander will present the slide show of Fly Gals, the story of the first American women military pilots in history, the WASPS who flew vital training and  flight missions freeing up men for combat. Free, all welcome. Garden Home Recreation Center, 7475 SW Oleson Road.

New Stories

Visit the spooky and humorous Garden Home Graveyard Halloween display on SW 82nd Ave by Kirstin Lurtz!

Read the memoir by Ward Nelson about growing up in Garden Home in the 1950s and 1960s.

Read our new story about Pat Bonney and her son Ken Woodard. Ken was the head coach of Portland State University’s track and field and cross country programs. Ken’s brother Keith has the same position at Lewis and Clark College.

Jacki Wisher and her mother Letha Lane talk about the fun at Alpenrose, their Shetland ponies, and growing up in Garden Home. Click here to read the story.

Periodically, the Garden Home History Project works with Christina Friedle, Chair of Geography at PCC to facilitate student research in her Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Certificate course in the area of mapping and geographic research. This article is a student research report about the Historic Oregon Electric Railway and Station Locations prepared by Brendon Slattery, 2018.

We have a new story about the development of SW Multnomah Blvd, written by Lowell Swanson, that was first printed in the Multnomah Historical Society’s Winter 2005 newsletter. The story was retrieved for us by Tim Lyman, their Chair, and is printed with his permission. It validates the date and process of discontinuing the railroad through Multnomah and pulling the rail tracks east of the Garden Home Station and Multnomah Boulevard developed. The contract for construction of Multnomah Blvd scheduled completion by August, 1949.

News

We sold ice cream sundae’s and displayed binders describing Garden Home’s historical dairies at the Saturday, August 25 Mini-Market at the Garden Home Recreation Center. Thanks to Darrell MacKay for our new banner, designed by Stan Houseman.

Gerry Frank promotional photo 2018

Gerry Frank promotional photo 2018

What to eat, see, and do in Oregon: We recently said hello to one of our favorite people, Gerry Frank, as he was selling his wonderful  book, Gerry Frank’s OregonGerry spent many summers in Garden Home and has always been a strong supporter. Gerry was our Senator Mark Hatfield’s Chief of Staff and often called “our third Senator.” Read his amazing story and see the wonderful vintage photos of his home and horses. Pick up his book for your travels! New York? Get that one, too.

Garden Home Community Library:  We welcome our new Library Director Molly Carlisle, who previously worked at the Tigard Library.  You might enjoy many newly added vintage library photos in our story about the history of the community library. The library started out as a volunteer library once the Garden Home School closed in 1982, assisted by THPRD.  It soon became part of WCCLS. Thanks to the many generous donors, we were able to enlarge from one classroom to two classrooms, the current size.  Now we are excited about the plans to enlarge to one more classroom.  Watch for our display of community history and news on the hallway walls.

Passing of Curtis Tigard. At 109, Curtis was one of the oldest living World War II veterans. To read more about Curtis Tigard, visit the Tigard Historical Association. You can also read about Curtis Tigard on the City of Tigard website (PDF document).

The Garden Home School class of 1958 held a reunion. Organized by Darrel MacKay and Ward Nelson among others. The people pictured are (left to right): Darrell MacKay, Doug Burns, Rita Losli, (Thoreson), Gordy Johnson, Lee Stapleton, Babs Tennent, (Anderson), Mike Sprague, Cheryl Eastman, (Mayhew), Connie Barns, (Anderson), Ward Nelson, Sandy Wood, (Poutala) not in our grade school class, but in our high school class and married Arnie Poutala, Don Stapleton, Arnie Poutala.

Class of 1958 Garden Home School 2018 Reunion

Class of 1958 Garden Home School 2018 Reunion

Lightning strike! On Thursday, June 21 at 7:56am, lightning struck and exploded two redwood trees on SW 84th Avenue just north of SW Garden Home Road. A third tree was also damaged on a neighbor’s property. No injuries or major structural damage were sustained. Thanks to Stan Houseman for the photographs of the aftermath.

We rang the historic 100-year old bell hanging in the bell tower of the Garden Home Marketplace (formerly Lamb’s Thriftway) on June 16, 2018. Our ears are still ringing! Thanks to Store Manager Mike Babbitt and all of the store staff for withstanding four hours of bell ringing. Click here to view all the photos of the bell ringing event.

Garden Home Market Place (formerly Lamb’s Thriftway) is changing their signage. Forrest Lamb first built and opened the Garden Home Thriftway in 1957. The store and the mall store buildings were owned by Forrest and Neva Lamb and then by their three sons, Bob, Gary and Colin Lamb. Forrest died in 1986 and Gary Lamb died in 1999. Neva died in 2005 at age 97. Bob Lamb sold the business of the grocery store in June of 2015. Colin Lamb retains ownership of the grocery building and the mall complex.

In 2015, Lamb’s Thriftway store was sold to a local company, Signature Northwest LLC , whose CEO is Mark Miller. This company also purchased three other Lamb grocery businesses and two Bales Thriftway stores, one in Cedar Mill and one in Aloha. Mike Babbitt is the store manager in Garden Home.

The large Lamb’s Thriftway Marketplace sign was removed from the front of the building in June, 2018 for repainting and renaming the store to (probably) be Garden Home Marketplace. The store continues to host the florist, liquor store, the Post Office, Wells Fargo Bank, and the Garden Home Growlers. The Growler section has grown beyond the first assigned space inside the main door and now flows into the former floral department with six tables.

The one-hundred year old bell from the former Garden Home Community Church continues on loan from the Methodist Conference and hangs in the bell tower at the main entrance. The store continues its important role supporting and recognizing community activities. The Garden Home History Project has an annual Bell Ringing event to publicize Garden Home’s unique history. Click here to read the full history of the Lamb family and Lamb’s Thriftway.

Friday, May 18, we held a reception honoring Ginny Mapes, author of Garden Home-the way it was, Traces of the Past and Chakeipi, the story of early Beaverton.  Slides of vintage Garden Home, refreshments and a reunion with classmates and teachers in Garden Home School. Click here to read more and view the full gallery of event photos.

This Summer: We’re gathering the unique features of Garden Home that we’ll unfold for you in some manner, wonderful surprises! Stay posted for the details.

 

Other News

Remembering many of our other stories. These fun excerpts from our stories are just samples of the content you can discover browsing our almost 200 articles. We hope you are writing your story for your family.

Colin Lamb: The electricity was off in the Garden Home area for about a week after the Columbus Day storm in 1962. Of course, many homes had no heat so Dad left the presto logs out in the front of the store with a note to pay for them the next day.

Dan Nebert: Therefore, the church window at all times seemed to remain unlocked, so that we were always able to enjoy our rainy Saturday afternoon ping-pong games.

Plane crash: Lt Strong managed to guide the plane over the town of Metzger to what looked like a wooded area before bailing out and landing in some nearby trees unhurt.

Zora and Sharka Becvar: We sat for a little while and, since we did not understand what the teacher was saying, we just looked at each other, got up and left the room and went home.

Bob Feldman: you might have seen young Bob Feldman riding his bike home from Garden Home School precariously toting a pail of slop from the cafeteria to feed his new baby pigs. 

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had five thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

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August 25, 2018 Ice Cream Station at the Mini Market (photos)

The Garden Home Recreation Center hosted a Mini-Market on August 25, 2018 with a variety of vendor booths, bouncy house, puppet show, and beer garden. The Garden Home History Project set up historical displays of Garden Home dairies and served ice cream sundaes.

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Ward Nelson – Garden Home memoir

Ward Nelson - 2011 100th anniversary of Garden Home School

Ward Nelson – 2011 100th anniversary of Garden Home School

We moved to 7814 SW Occidental Avenue as it was called in those days, in 1947. Today it is 7170 SW 76th. My parents were Helene and Ward Nelson. We moved from Ardenwald, near Milwaukie, where my grandmother lived. Our property butted up against the Garden Home school woods. We could climb over the fence and play in the woods with lots of hiding places. The woods were next to Aaron Frank’s property. Frank was the owner of the Meier and Frank department store in downtown Portland.

My brother Bill was born about the time we moved. We had a large property; our house sat on the front half of it, and there was a huge pasture in back with a chicken coop and pig pen. We had an acre of land, and there was plenty of land to raise animals and to have a garden, which tied in with my father’s upbringing in rural Minnesota. Mother, who grew up in Ardenwald, was a city girl and was not too thrilled about living in the country! During the time we lived there we had, at one time or another, chickens, pigs, sheep, a cow, turkeys, geese.

At first, there was just the house; my father later built the garage which contained a large work space for his U-bolt business. Our property contained a number of apples trees, a peach tree, several pear trees, a plum tree, a filbert tree, cherry trees, and walnut trees. There was an enormous spruce, I think it was, in front of the house, and I used to climb to the very top, from which I could see the school.

My father worked originally for McCall Oil, driving truck, but he eventually went to work for Schwager Wood, a high-voltage manufacturing company in Multnomah. The plant was located at the corner of Multnomah Blvd. and 35th. Mother stayed home to begin with but worked at a variety of places: the Bank of California, Securities Intermountain, Inc.; Herlen Homes, and finally Bucher Realty. My parents were divorced in 1968, and she eventually married Wylis Bucher, the owner of Bucher Realty.

As a child, my brother and I stayed with Mrs. Anna Lindley, who lived up the street and who cared for a number of neighborhood children. She lived in what was then the third house on the west side of the street. She also had a large yard with a chicken coop in the back. She had a shed in the back that was not attached to the house, and one room was the proverbial woodshed where she literally had cords of wood stacked up, and the other end was her laundry room with an old Maytag wringer washer. It was the kind you had to crank.

“Lynn,” as we called her, had a huge garden, and I recall her growing kale, which she dried and fed to her chickens! (Some would say that that is the best use of kale.) She also had a stand of bamboo on the edge of her property, which she called “elephant ears,” and which she guarded zealously. They grew 6-10 feet. Woe to the wayward child who knocked any of those stalks down! She fixed us lunch each day, and it was nearly always the same: sandwiches, and Lipton chicken noodle soup, to which she added elbow macaroni or those little pasta alphabets. She had a wood stove on which she could cook anything, and she never owned an electric stove. Each day she listened to “The Romance of Helen Trent,” and “Nora Drake.” My most vivid memory is of the earthquake in 1949; she herded us into the middle of the living room, and we all stood there until it was over.

Our original neighbor was a woman named Ethel Fraley. Around 1950 or so, the Flowers family moved in: Dave, Elsie, Brad, Dick, Ann, Jean, and eventually Lynn, and Virginia. The four oldest graduated from Beaverton High, and Lynn and Virginia (Ginger) graduated from Parkrose High in the late 60s or early 70s. The Flowers lived there until I graduated from high school in 1962 at which point the Harmons moved in. The Flowers kids and I used to play First Bounce or Fly (a kind of baseball game) in the street because it was a dead end, butting up against Aaron Frank’s property.

76th is the street just west of the school, left side of photo

The Billups, Lynn and Mrs. Thompson lived on the west side of Occidental along with the Goldsmiths and their son Tom, and the Holmes. On the east side of the street from south to north were Mrs. Replogle and her son Dave; old Mr. Dale who lived next door; the Grants who later moved to the Hunt Club; Mrs. Van Patten; the Potters whose house hasn’t changed a bit; the Bettendorfs and their son Bob; and the Slettlands (I think—something like that). There really was very little change in the neighbors over the years. My good friend was Clark Martin, who lived over on 77th, and we used to go back and forth using the empty field that was right across from our house. We decided to make wine when we were in high school as Clark either had gotten a kit from someone or a recipe; at any rate, suffice it to say that it never really turned out! Clark and I both went to Willamette to college, and he was the best man at my wedding.

I started school at the Garden Home Elementary School in 1950. My first grade teacher was Leone Santee; second was Helen McEwen; third, Stella Morrison; fourth, Margaret Brockhaus; fifth, Ruth Kaiser; sixth, Robert Polier; seventh, Frances Lawrence; eighth, Leonard Gustafson. I was the valedictorian of the Class of 1958. Wayne Thurman was the principal and Bobbie Henderson was the secretary for the entire eight years I was there. In the third grade, Mrs. Morrison would have one of her pet students, either me or Cheryl Eastman, go across the street to the corner grocery store to buy her a U-No bar! I can’t imagine that happening today, to be sure.

That store, owned by the Throckmorton’s, burned in 1956. Mrs. Throckmorton apparently fainted when she saw the store go up in flames. It was really a dramatic event in a small community. Right across the street was a gas station owned by Gust Johnson, whose daughter Dorothy went on to become the first runner-up in the Miss America pageant, which everyone watched in those days.

Starting in the second grade, I took piano lessons from Jim Bastien, who lived on Oleson Road, near the intersection, in a house that is still there today. I recall vividly the time Jim played a piano concerto with the Portland Junior Symphony, as it was called in those days. He eventually married, and he and his wife went on to produce a very popular series of piano method books and ancillary materials. In the seventh grade, Phil McGriff, who was the other seventh grade teacher and also the school band director, twisted my arm into learning how to play the tuba, and as a result, I played tuba through graduate school, thus making for a very musical upbringing.

1957 Garden Home School PTA members Mrs. Byron Meisner and Mrs. Ward Nelson at a PTA event in Pendleton, Oregon

1957 Garden Home School PTA members Mrs. Byron Meisner and Mrs. Ward Nelson at a PTA event in Pendleton, Oregon.
See post.

My mother was president of the PTA in my eighth grade year and had been involved for several years. The PTA put on an annual carnival, the Frontier Frolic, as a fund raiser for the school. She worked with some really neat women: Jean McCarthy, Margaret Emmons come to mind, but there were others. She had a scrapbook that she had put together of her years in the PTA, and it is now in the hands of the Garden Home History Project. This scrapbook will be available to read in the library when they get their new space.

As a family, we didn’t have lots of money, and so we didn’t go on extravagant vacations, but we went to the beach frequently and camped. My favorite place was the federal campground at Cape Perpetua, south of Yachats. We also stayed in Wheeler in a motel while my father and his friends went fishing, crabbing, and clamming. Our best friends were Harvey and Grace Reinhardt. Harvey and his brother Fritz owned a construction business, and they built the addition to the school, and they also built Garden Home Enterprises as well as the new Methodist church. Harvey died when I was in the eighth grade, and Grace eventually remarried. Lamb’s Thriftway was the anchor, and there was also an ice cream shop; Dr. William Later, a dentist; a cleaner’s; a variety store; the post office; a drug store; and an office for Garden Home Enterprises itself. Mother kept the books for Garden Home Enterprises. Several people invested money in GHE, including my grandmother, Gertrude Herzog, not related to the Robert Herzog family from Garden Home.

We had a black lab named Skip, and one day, he followed Mother to the office, unbeknownst to her. He slithered into her office, still unseen, and lay down behind the door. Mom did not know he was there, and so she locked up for the night and left the poor dog there. When she went to the office the next day, Skip had tried to claw his way out of the office, leaving a big gouge in the door. We all felt awful about the oversight!

Richfield Gas Station map, circa 1940’s

In 1956, I started an Oregonian morning paper route. The box where we picked up our papers was located at the corner at the intersection of Oleson and Garden Home Road. Don Woldridge was the manager. There were three or four routes in Garden Home. You had to get up around 4:45, head to the corner, rain or shine, pick up your papers, and deliver them on your bike. At the end of the month, you had to collect from your customers. The daily and Sunday paper cost $1.95, the daily only was $1.30, and the Sunday only was $.65. Daily and Sunday customers almost always gave you two dollars, and I always had the nickel in change ready. Some let me keep it, but many did not. This was a 365-day-a year job—no time off for good behavior! The route went down Oleson Road to the Hunt Club, into the Hunt Club and back around the corner on Oleson, then up Canby Street, eventually coming out at Whitney’s Cannery. From there, it was up Garden Home Road to 66th, down that street and all along those back roads, eventually coming back to GH Road and then to the Methodist church on Royal at Garden Home Road, down Royal Avenue (71st), back up and then down Jaeger (74th), eventually winding up in the new area that came out on Oleson Road on Stewart Street. It was a long route! I had 65+ dailies and 80+ Sundays.

There were some really interesting people who lived on that route: the Hunt Club group, the Porshmans, both the school cooks Isolda Steele and Ellen Norris, Aaron Frank, Rev. Wood, Therese Sutter, and many others. Clark would occasionally sub for me when we were gone. My parents would usually take me around on Sunday because the papers were so thick, but I also had to do it myself often, which meant having to go back to the box twice to pick up enough papers to take around.

I recall picking up the papers one morning and reading that the Russians had launched a satellite, Sputnik, and being scared to go on the route that day! Speaking of the Russians, we had a civil defense drill every Monday: the siren would go off at 12:05, and I recall always stopping when I heard it to make sure it was Monday and that it was 12:05. I had seen a super scary movie entitled “Invasion USA,” about the Russians invading and blowing up New York City. Those were the heady days of the cold war.

BHS 1951 building (removed 3rd floor after earthquake)

From Garden Home Grade School, I entered Beaverton High in 1958 and graduated in 1962. I then went to Willamette University in Salem, majoring in music and picked up the organ as my major instrument. All the time I was growing up, I attended the Methodist church, participating in the Methodist Youth Fellowship (MYF), and playing the piano for Sunday School. They purchased an electronic organ around 1958 or so, and I took some lessons from the company that installed it, but it was never my thing until I discovered the pipe organ in college and went bonkers! In college, I played at the West Salem Methodist Church my junior and senior years, and I earned enough money for trips to Monk’s, a local watering hole in Salem! I always thought that if the kindly folks at that church knew what I was spending their hard-earned money on, they might not have been too pleased. I got $40 a month and had to walk from the dorm over to West Salem my junior year; my senior year, I had a ’54 Chev that got me around nicely!

From Willamette, I went to Michigan State to get my Master’s degree in music, returned to Oregon and became the organist at Valley Community Presbyterian Church in Raleigh Hills and the band director for the Vernonia School District. In 1980, I took the position of music director at St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church in Beaverton, and in 1985, I switched teaching assignments from music to English, having picked up an English endorsement from Lewis and Clark. I retired from Vernonia in 1998, taught half-time five more years, and then subbed in the Beaverton district for another ten years. I retired from St. Bart’s in June of 2017.

Currently, my wife Pam and I live in the Claremont development at the corner of West Union and Bethany Blvd., and our son Mark and his wife Nia and their two children live in Novato, California.

– Ward Nelson, 2018

Posted in Memoirs, People | Tagged | 1 Comment

September 2018 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

1903 Halloween Murder on Garden Home Road

Monday, October 8, 6:30pm – 40-minute slide presentation on the 1903 Halloween Murder on Garden Home Road. Surprise ending! Garden Home Recreation Center, 7475 SW Oleson Road.

New Stories

Read the memoir by Ward Nelson about growing up in Garden Home in the 1950s and 1960s.

Read our new story about Pat Bonney and her son Ken Woodard. Ken was the head coach of Portland State University’s track and field and cross country programs. Ken’s brother Keith has the same position at Lewis and Clark College.

Jacki Wisher and her mother Letha Lane talk about the fun at Alpenrose, their Shetland ponies, and growing up in Garden Home. Click here to read the story.

Periodically, the Garden Home History Project works with Christina Friedle, Chair of Geography at PCC to facilitate student research in her Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Certificate course in the area of mapping and geographic research. This article is a student research report about the Historic Oregon Electric Railway and Station Locations prepared by Brendon Slattery, 2018.

We have a new story about the development of SW Multnomah Blvd, written by Lowell Swanson, that was first printed in the Multnomah Historical Society’s Winter 2005 newsletter. The story was retrieved for us by Tim Lyman, their Chair, and is printed with his permission. It validates the date and process of discontinuing the railroad through Multnomah and pulling the rail tracks east of the Garden Home Station and Multnomah Boulevard developed. The contract for construction of Multnomah Blvd scheduled completion by August, 1949.

News

We sold ice cream sundae’s and displayed binders describing Garden Home’s historical dairies at the Saturday, August 25 Mini-Market at the Garden Home Recreation Center. Thanks to Darrell MacKay for our new banner, designed by Stan Houseman.

Gerry Frank promotional photo 2018

Gerry Frank promotional photo 2018

What to eat, see, and do in Oregon: We recently said hello to one of our favorite people, Gerry Frank, as he was selling his wonderful  book, Gerry Frank’s OregonGerry spent many summers in Garden Home and has always been a strong supporter. Gerry was our Senator Mark Hatfield’s Chief of Staff and often called “our third Senator.” Read his amazing story and see the wonderful vintage photos of his home and horses. Pick up his book for your travels! New York? Get that one, too.

Garden Home Community Library:  We welcome our new Library Director Molly Carlisle, who previously worked at the Tigard Library.  You might enjoy many newly added vintage library photos in our story about the history of the community library. The library started out as a volunteer library once the Garden Home School closed in 1982, assisted by THPRD.  It soon became part of WCCLS. Thanks to the many generous donors, we were able to enlarge from one classroom to two classrooms, the current size.  Now we are excited about the plans to enlarge to one more classroom.  Watch for our display of community history and news on the hallway walls.

Passing of Curtis Tigard. At 109, Curtis was one of the oldest living World War II veterans. To read more about Curtis Tigard, visit the Tigard Historical Association. You can also read about Curtis Tigard on the City of Tigard website (PDF document).

The Garden Home School class of 1958 held a reunion. Organized by Darrel MacKay and Ward Nelson among others. The people pictured are (left to right): Darrell MacKay, Doug Burns, Rita Losli, (Thoreson), Gordy Johnson, Lee Stapleton, Babs Tennent, (Anderson), Mike Sprague, Cheryl Eastman, (Mayhew), Connie Barns, (Anderson), Ward Nelson, Sandy Wood, (Poutala) not in our grade school class, but in our high school class and married Arnie Poutala, Don Stapleton, Arnie Poutala.

Class of 1958 Garden Home School 2018 Reunion

Class of 1958 Garden Home School 2018 Reunion

Lightning strike! On Thursday, June 21 at 7:56am, lightning struck and exploded two redwood trees on SW 84th Avenue just north of SW Garden Home Road. A third tree was also damaged on a neighbor’s property. No injuries or major structural damage were sustained. Thanks to Stan Houseman for the photographs of the aftermath.

We rang the historic 100-year old bell hanging in the bell tower of the Garden Home Marketplace (formerly Lamb’s Thriftway) on June 16, 2018. Our ears are still ringing! Thanks to Store Manager Mike Babbitt and all of the store staff for withstanding four hours of bell ringing. Click here to view all the photos of the bell ringing event.

Garden Home Market Place (formerly Lamb’s Thriftway) is changing their signage. Forrest Lamb first built and opened the Garden Home Thriftway in 1957. The store and the mall store buildings were owned by Forrest and Neva Lamb and then by their three sons, Bob, Gary and Colin Lamb. Forrest died in 1986 and Gary Lamb died in 1999. Neva died in 2005 at age 97. Bob Lamb sold the business of the grocery store in June of 2015. Colin Lamb retains ownership of the grocery building and the mall complex.

In 2015, Lamb’s Thriftway store was sold to a local company, Signature Northwest LLC , whose CEO is Mark Miller. This company also purchased three other Lamb grocery businesses and two Bales Thriftway stores, one in Cedar Mill and one in Aloha. Mike Babbitt is the store manager in Garden Home.

The large Lamb’s Thriftway Marketplace sign was removed from the front of the building in June, 2018 for repainting and renaming the store to (probably) be Garden Home Marketplace. The store continues to host the florist, liquor store, the Post Office, Wells Fargo Bank, and the Garden Home Growlers. The Growler section has grown beyond the first assigned space inside the main door and now flows into the former floral department with six tables.

The one-hundred year old bell from the former Garden Home Community Church continues on loan from the Methodist Conference and hangs in the bell tower at the main entrance. The store continues its important role supporting and recognizing community activities. The Garden Home History Project has an annual Bell Ringing event to publicize Garden Home’s unique history. Click here to read the full history of the Lamb family and Lamb’s Thriftway.

Friday, May 18, we held a reception honoring Ginny Mapes, author of Garden Home-the way it was, Traces of the Past and Chakeipi, the story of early Beaverton.  Slides of vintage Garden Home, refreshments and a reunion with classmates and teachers in Garden Home School. Click here to read more and view the full gallery of event photos.

This Summer: We’re gathering the unique features of Garden Home that we’ll unfold for you in some manner, wonderful surprises! Stay posted for the details.

 

Other News

Remembering many of our other stories. These fun excerpts from our stories are just samples of the content you can discover browsing our almost 200 articles. We hope you are writing your story for your family.

Colin Lamb: The electricity was off in the Garden Home area for about a week after the Columbus Day storm in 1962. Of course, many homes had no heat so Dad left the presto logs out in the front of the store with a note to pay for them the next day.

Dan Nebert: Therefore, the church window at all times seemed to remain unlocked, so that we were always able to enjoy our rainy Saturday afternoon ping-pong games.

Plane crash: Lt Strong managed to guide the plane over the town of Metzger to what looked like a wooded area before bailing out and landing in some nearby trees unhurt.

Zora and Sharka Becvar: We sat for a little while and, since we did not understand what the teacher was saying, we just looked at each other, got up and left the room and went home.

Bob Feldman: you might have seen young Bob Feldman riding his bike home from Garden Home School precariously toting a pail of slop from the cafeteria to feed his new baby pigs. 

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had five thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

Posted in News | Tagged | 1 Comment

August 2018 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

News

Passing of Curtis Tigard. At 109, Curtis was one of the oldest living World War II veterans. To read more about Curtis Tigard, visit the Tigard Historical Association. You can also read about Curtis Tigard on the City of Tigard website (PDF document).

We’ve added a new story about Pat Bonney and her son Ken Woodard. Ken was the head coach of Portland State University’s track and field and cross country programs. Ken’s brother Keith has the same position at Lewis and Clark College.

The Garden Home School class of 1958 held a reunion. Organized by Darrel MacKay and Ward Nelson among others. The people pictured are (left to right): Darrell MacKay, Doug Burns, Rita Losli, (Thoreson), Gordy Johnson, Lee Stapleton, Babs Tennent, (Anderson), Mike Sprague, Cheryl Eastman, (Mayhew), Connie Barns, (Anderson), Ward Nelson, Sandy Wood, (Poutala) not in our grade school class, but in our high school class and married Arnie Poutala, Don Stapleton, Arnie Poutala.

Class of 1958 Garden Home School 2018 Reunion

Class of 1958 Garden Home School 2018 Reunion

Lightning strike! On Thursday, June 21 at 7:56am, lightning struck and exploded two redwood trees on SW 84th Avenue just north of SW Garden Home Road. A third tree was also damaged on a neighbor’s property. No injuries or major structural damage were sustained. Thanks to Stan Houseman for the photographs of the aftermath.

We rang the historic 100-year old bell hanging in the bell tower of the Garden Home Marketplace (formerly Lamb’s Thriftway) on June 16, 2018. Our ears are still ringing! Thanks to Store Manager Mike Babbitt and all of the store staff for withstanding four hours of bell ringing. Click here to view all the photos of the bell ringing event.

Garden Home Market Place (formerly Lamb’s Thriftway) is changing their signage. Forrest Lamb first built and opened the Garden Home Thriftway in 1957. The store and the mall store buildings were owned by Forrest and Neva Lamb and then by their three sons, Bob, Gary and Colin Lamb. Forrest died in 1986 and Gary Lamb died in 1999. Neva died in 2005 at age 97. Bob Lamb sold the business of the grocery store in June of 2015. Colin Lamb retains ownership of the grocery building and the mall complex.

In 2015, Lamb’s Thriftway store was sold to a local company, Signature Northwest LLC , whose CEO is Mark Miller. This company also purchased three other Lamb grocery businesses and two Bales Thriftway stores, one in Cedar Mill and one in Aloha. Mike Babbitt is the store manager in Garden Home.

The large Lamb’s Thriftway Marketplace sign was removed from the front of the building in June, 2018 for repainting and renaming the store to (probably) be Garden Home Marketplace. The store continues to host the florist, liquor store, the Post Office, Wells Fargo Bank, and the Garden Home Growlers. The Growler section has grown beyond the first assigned space inside the main door and now flows into the former floral department with six tables.

The one-hundred year old bell from the former Garden Home Community Church continues on loan from the Methodist Conference and hangs in the bell tower at the main entrance. The store continues its important role supporting and recognizing community activities. The Garden Home History Project has an annual Bell Ringing event to publicize Garden Home’s unique history. Click here to read the full history of the Lamb family and Lamb’s Thriftway.

Friday, May 18, we held a reception honoring Ginny Mapes, author of Garden Home-the way it was, Traces of the Past and Chakeipi, the story of early Beaverton.  Slides of vintage Garden Home, refreshments and a reunion with classmates and teachers in Garden Home School. Click here to read more and view the full gallery of event photos.

This Summer: We’re gathering the unique features of Garden Home that we’ll unfold for you in some manner, wonderful surprises! Stay posted for the details.

Upcoming Events

June 24 to August 19. Summer Scavenger Hunt sponsored by the the Garden Home Recreation Center. Visit the office at the rec center to join the hunt!

Saturday, August 25. Summer Mini Market sponsored by the the Garden Home Recreation Center.

Other News

Remembering many of our other stories. These fun excerpts from our stories are just samples of the content you can discover browsing our almost 200 articles. We hope you are writing your story for your family.

Colin Lamb: The electricity was off in the Garden Home area for about a week after the Columbus Day storm in 1962. Of course, many homes had no heat so Dad left the presto logs out in the front of the store with a note to pay for them the next day.

Dan Nebert: Therefore, the church window at all times seemed to remain unlocked, so that we were always able to enjoy our rainy Saturday afternoon ping-pong games.

Plane crash: Lt Strong managed to guide the plane over the town of Metzger to what looked like a wooded area before bailing out and landing in some nearby trees unhurt.

Zora and Sharka Becvar: We sat for a little while and, since we did not understand what the teacher was saying, we just looked at each other, got up and left the room and went home.

Bob Feldman: you might have seen young Bob Feldman riding his bike home from Garden Home School precariously toting a pail of slop from the cafeteria to feed his new baby pigs. 

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had five thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

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Patty Bonney and son Ken Woodard

By Elaine Shreve, July 10, 2018

Patty Bonney brought her three children to Garden Home in 1960 when she married Bill Bonney. Patty, Ken, Keith and Carolyn all joined Bill in his home on two acres on SW Oleson Road south of the Garden Home intersection near SW 89th Ave. Bill worked at Tektronix. Bill and Patty soon added Alan in 1964 and Regina in 1966 to the household. Unfortunately, Bill died in 1976.

Bill’s story is also interesting. When Bill’s mother died in 1926, he was about six years old and his father, not knowing what to do, placed him at the St. Mary’s Home for Boys on Tualatin Valley Highway in Beaverton. Founded in 1889 as an orphanage for abandoned and wayward children, today St. Mary’s offers residential treatment and services for at-risk boys. Bill stayed there for a year until his father came for him. Patty says Bill was scarred from his year there and was anti-religious the rest of his life.

As was not unusual in that era, Bill’s family did not support his desire to go to high school. For his senior year he moved into a boarding house in Portland and paid his way working in the chemistry lab at Lincoln High where he attended for three years.

Patty became a faithful volunteer at Garden Home School. In the early days of the 1970s, she worked in Mary Jane Seiffert’s classroom one year and the school library. In the library she volunteered under Ginny Mapes’ direction and helped on the first Garden Home history book, Garden Home – the way it was. In about 1975 she started volunteering in Mrs. Carol Lintner’s classroom. Mrs. Lintner’s name now is Carol Bambace and they live in Lake Oswego. After many years of retirement, Patty and Carol still get together annually for birthdays.

Patty was often seen walking along Oleson Road to her home reading a book enroute. We all knew her, with her sun or rain hat, her backpack, and a good mystery book. This was before the current sidewalks. She also enjoys histories such as Jane Kirkpatrick’s historical fiction about NW women or reviewing her books of true stories about Australia.

Garden Home has an active branch of the Oregon State University’s Extension program, called the Garden Home Families and Community Education Study Group, FCE, (but commonly called Extension). This Extension group has had a long history here in Garden Home and served as a community service organization that follows the OSU Extension education programs. Community service is encouraged for all participants. Patty has enjoyed knitting tiny hats for the gift bags that are distributed to all newborns at the Tuality Community Hospital in Hillsboro during the month of May each year. These gifts bags each contain new books, blankets, and other supplies for the babies. They took 25 decorated bags to the hospital this last May.

Click here to read more about the Garden Home Extension Study Group.

When the Garden Home School closed in June of 1982, the Tualatin Hills Park and Recreation District began to rent a few of the rooms. Many of the school’s library books had remained in the building. Patty and a small group of mothers including Catherine Kent and her daughter Marie Pacella, Helen Sanford and Judy Freck began the development of a community lending library run by volunteers. Judy Freck was instrumental in the organization of library and along with her husband Bill Freck continued to manage the library until it was accepted into the Washington County Cooperative Library Services.

Click here to read more about the the Garden Home Community Library.

Patty, now in her 80s, keeps a very busy schedule that now includes church activities and square dancing. After knitting ‘thousands’ of premie caps for hospital newborns, she now knits scarves from yarn on hand to give to the Northwest Pilot Project, NWPP, a service organization for the elderly poor in downtown Portland. “It’s a good cause and the projects are mindless. I can do all kinds of things with them while paying little attention, suitable for meetings.”

Patty’s dentist, Dr. Steven Little, wrote a laudatory article for the Southwest Portland Post saying he’s seen her knitting while getting dental work done. “you’ll see her laid back in the dental chair, hygienist at work and Patty’s knitting needles up in the air creating one of her precious gifts.” Patty first met Steven as a dental technician at the dental school before he became a fully qualified dentist. Dr. Little says she was his first patient.

Ken and Keith Woodard graduated from Beaverton High in 1967 and 1968, Carolyn Woodard in 1969, Alan Bonney in 1982, and Regina who took her GED (she would have graduated in 1984).

[Editor: Carolyn was our first babysitter for our twins Tom and Andy back in 1967. At first we thought we’d need two sitters but Carolyn proved totally capable and continued with us for several years. – Elaine Shreve]

Ken Woodard – When Bill and Patty married, Ken began at Garden Home School in the 6th grade. Len Gustafson was the principal. Ken went on through eighth grade at Garden Home and then into Beaverton High for the historic 1964-65 year of the high school running double shifts to accommodate the 4 grades of high school and to serve the large attendance area. The next year Aloha High operated 2 grades out of the Merle Davies Elementary building while Aloha High was being built. Whitford Intermediate School opened in 1963 which soon took on the 9th grade class of students leaving 3 grades at Beaverton High.

In 1944, voters in Beaverton School District 48 and over a dozen elementary districts approved the formation of a union high school district. Then in 1944 with an increase in the number of students, a high school and 12 elementary schools consolidated to form Beaverton District 48. New school buildings have continued to the present year, 2017-18, when the new Mountainside High School opened off of Scholls Ferry Road. *See School Days by Gerald Varner (book).

Ken’s interest in sports began at Garden Home School where the boys played competitive flag football and basketball against other local grades schools. He remembers the blue and white Wildcat t-shirts. Ken went on to excel in cross country distance running and then became head Cross Country/Track and Field coach at Portland State University in the 1980s and 1990s. His brother Keith was his assistant. Ken is married and built his own home on Oleson at 89th. Ken enjoys buying old tractors and restoring them to sell.

Ken’s brother Keith Woodard is now head Cross Country/Track and Field Coach and program Director today at Lewis & Clark College., his 11th year coaching at Lewis & Clark. Both of these men have had outstanding track careers.

* Varner, Gerald H. School Days, A History of Public Schools in and Around Beaverton, Oregon, 1856-2000. Published by Gerald Varner in association with Beaverton School District. 2000

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Historic Oregon Electric Railway and Station Locations

Periodically, the Garden Home History Project works Christina Friedle, Chair of Geography at PCC to facilitate student research in her Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Certificate course in the area of mapping and geographic research. This article is a student research report prepared by Brendon Slattery, 2018. Two other student research projects can be found in the Resources page, one about the contruction of buildings by decad by Spenser Kuroda and one about the local floodplains by Erin Woolbright.

Slattery Research - OE railway maps - Overview

Overview of Oregon Electric locations research


Slattery Research - OE railway maps - Garden Home detail

Garden Home – Oregon Electric locations


Slattery Research - OE railway maps - Tigard detail

Tigard – Oregon Electric locations


Slattery Research - OE railway maps - Hillsboro detail

Hillsboro – Oregon Electric locations


Slattery Research - OE railway maps - Forest Grove detail

Forest Grove – Oregon Electric locations

Methods

Most of the data recovered for this map was the product of looking at aerial photography and historic maps on historicmapworks.com. Three shape files had to be created to display the Oregon Electric Railway lines, the station locations, and the Garden Home Recreation Center. First, I took a base map and laid down a shapefile for the major streets so that I could see the street names, and by switching from Google Earth to ArcMap, I was able to trace out the locations of the demolished lines and station locations. To draw the shapes out, I made a Geodatabase and made three feature classes for rail lines, stations and the Garden Home Recreation Center as a reference point. Afterwards, I created a field in each attribute table and added the names of all the stops. The final map includes these three features as well as the areas of development within SW Portland, the neighborhood boundaries with all their names, and a hill shade for effect. The data and shapefiles for these additional features were taken from RLIS.

Discussion/Results/Sources

The old historic Oregon Electric Line went into operation on New Year’s Day, 1908 and operated as a passenger rail line up until 1933. Much of the old railway has been demolished as well as the stations along the line. In addition, many of the stations were named after the street that they were on, but most of the street names have been renamed with numbers making it more difficult to pinpoint where exactly these stations may have been. Using historic maps and Google Earth proved to be helpful for this as you could see the ground in great detail that allowed you to see building and rail imprints on the ground. The line continues south from Tualatin all the way down to Salem and from Garden Home west into Forest Grove. Some of the station locations were difficult to pinpoint further west and east towards Multnomah Village.

Sources: historicmapworks.com, RLIS, swtrails.org, ohs.org

Coordinate System: NAD 83 Oregon Statewide

Posted in Early History | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Kenneth John Neuburger obituary

Kenneth John Neuburger October 21, 1940 to June 18, 2018

Kenneth John Neuburger
October 21, 1940 – June 18, 2018

Ken was born in Longmont, CO to Frank and Leona Rupp Neuburger on October 22, 1940, and died on June 18, 2018 in Portland, OR. The family moved to Salem, OR when Ken was in eighth grade where he attended St. Joseph grade school and Serra Catholic high school (class of 1958). Ken briefly attended the University of Portland and graduated with an engineering degree from Oregon State University in 1963 where he met his future wife, Jeanette Wachter. Ken worked as an engineer with the federal government and retired from US Fish and Wildlife in 1997 after 30 years of service. Ken and Jeanette had almost 54 years of marriage with many great adventures and happy times.

Ken’s passions were his wife and family as well as playing and watching sports. He was a lifelong supporter of the Beavers and a competitive and recreational athlete – playing football and basketball in his youth and softball and golf later in life. He never missed an opportunity to spend time with his family and watch them pursue their own passions.
He is survived by Jeanette and two children, Karen (Damon) Vickers and Jim (Amy) Neuburger, five grandchildren, Paul, Thomas, Alaina, James and Truman, brothers Jerry and Wayne and sister Diane.

The funeral will be Friday, June 22, 2018 at St. Luke’s Catholic Church in Woodburn at 11:30 am. There will be a Rosary at 11:00. In lieu of flowers the family is requesting donations to Rock Steady Boxing for Parkinson’s where Ken boxed for several years to help with his Parkinson’s disease. Checks can be sent to Kimberly Berg, 21983 S. Saling Road, Estacada, OR 97023 in honor of Ken Neuburger.

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July 2018 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

News

Lightning strike! On Thursday, June 21 at 7:56am, lightning struck and exploded two redwood trees on SW 84th Avenue just north of SW Garden Home Road. A third tree was also damaged on a neighbor’s property. No injuries or major structural damage were sustained. Thanks to Stan Houseman for the photographs of the aftermath.

We rang the historic 100-year old bell hanging in the bell tower of the Garden Home Marketplace (formerly Lamb’s Thriftway) on June 16, 2018. Our ears are still ringing! Thanks to Store Manager Mike Babbitt and all of the store staff for withstanding four hours of bell ringing. Click here to view all the photos of the bell ringing event.

Garden Home Market Place (formerly Lamb’s Thriftway) is changing their signage. Forrest Lamb first built and opened the Garden Home Thriftway in 1957. The store and the mall store buildings were owned by Forrest and Neva Lamb and then by their three sons, Bob, Gary and Colin Lamb. Forrest died in 1986 and Gary Lamb died in 1999. Neva died in 2005 at age 97. Bob Lamb sold the business of the grocery store in June of 2015. Colin Lamb retains ownership of the grocery building and the mall complex.

In 2015, Lamb’s Thriftway store was sold to a local company, Signature Northwest LLC , whose CEO is Mark Miller. This company also purchased three other Lamb grocery businesses and two Bales Thriftway stores, one in Cedar Mill and one in Aloha. Mike Babbitt is the store manager in Garden Home.

The large Lamb’s Thriftway Marketplace sign was removed from the front of the building in June, 2018 for repainting and renaming the store to (probably) be Garden Home Marketplace. The store continues to host the florist, liquor store, the Post Office, Wells Fargo Bank, and the Garden Home Growlers. The Growler section has grown beyond the first assigned space inside the main door and now flows into the former floral department with six tables.

The one-hundred year old bell from the former Garden Home Community Church continues on loan from the Methodist Conference and hangs in the bell tower at the main entrance. The store continues its important role supporting and recognizing community activities. The Garden Home History Project has an annual Bell Ringing event to publicize Garden Home’s unique history. Click here to read the full history of the Lamb family and Lamb’s Thriftway.

Friday, May 18, we held a reception honoring Ginny Mapes, author of Garden Home-the way it was, Traces of the Past and Chakeipi, the story of early Beaverton.  Slides of vintage Garden Home, refreshments and a reunion with classmates and teachers in Garden Home School. Click here to read more and view the full gallery of event photos.

We held our Board of Director’s annual meeting on March 12, and elected our officers:

  • Co-Chairs: Patsy VandeVenter and Elaine Shreve
  • Treasurer: Marie Pacella
  • Secretary: Mark Kajitani
  • Board members:  Stan and Susan Houseman, Jan Fredrickson, Virginia Vanture, Esta Mapes, Louise Cook Jones, and John Pacella
  • Advisory committee members: Bob Cram, Sharon Cram, Tom Shreve, Sharon Vedder, and Carole Vranizan.

This Summer: We’re gathering the unique features of Garden Home that we’ll unfold for you in some manner, wonderful surprises! Stay posted for the details.

Upcoming Events

June 24 to August 19. Summer Scavenger Hunt sponsored by the the Garden Home Recreation Center. Visit the office at the rec center to join the hunt!

Saturday, August 25. Summer Mini Market sponsored by the the Garden Home Recreation Center.

Other News

Remembering many of our other stories. These fun excerpts from our stories are just samples of the content you can discover browsing our almost 200 articles. We hope you are writing your story for your family.

Colin Lamb: The electricity was off in the Garden Home area for about a week after the Columbus Day storm in 1962. Of course, many homes had no heat so Dad left the presto logs out in the front of the store with a note to pay for them the next day.

Dan Nebert: Therefore, the church window at all times seemed to remain unlocked, so that we were always able to enjoy our rainy Saturday afternoon ping-pong games.

Plane crash: Lt Strong managed to guide the plane over the town of Metzger to what looked like a wooded area before bailing out and landing in some nearby trees unhurt.

Zora and Sharka Becvar: We sat for a little while and, since we did not understand what the teacher was saying, we just looked at each other, got up and left the room and went home.

Bob Feldman: you might have seen young Bob Feldman riding his bike home from Garden Home School precariously toting a pail of slop from the cafeteria to feed his new baby pigs. 

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had five thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Get your Historic Garden Home t-shirt now for just $14 for small to XL. Larger XXL and XXXL sizes are $17. There is an additional charge of $9 to mail your shirt. They’re fun! Available at the Garden Home Market Place.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

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June 16, 2018 Historic Bell Ringing Photos

We rang the historic 100-year old bell hanging in the bell tower of the Garden Home Marketplace (formerly Lamb’s Thriftway) on June 16, 2018. Our ears are still ringing!

Thanks to Store Manager Mike Babbitt and all of the store staff for withstanding four hours of bell ringing.

 

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Development of SW Multnomah Boulevard

Editor: This story, written by Lowell Swanson, was first printed in the Multnomah Historical Society’s Winter 2005 newsletter. The story was retrieved for us by Tim Lyman, their Chair, and is printed with his permission. It validates the date and process of discontinuing the railroad through Multnomah and pulling the rail tracks east of the Garden Home Station and Multnomah Boulevard developed. The contract for construction of Multnomah Blvd scheduled completion by August, 1949. See end of story for additional notes.

Development of Multnomah Boulevard

On May 26, 1931 the Oregon Electric was permitted to abandon its tracks from the Hoyt Street Station to the Jefferson Street Station. It was May 23, 1906 when the franchise had been given for the Portland tracks; it was dying after twenty five years. These were the years of the Great Depression, which certainly did not help. Although the Oregon Electric seldom made a profit in its own right, it still generated revenue to owner Hill and his other lines, the S P & S, the Great Northern, and the Northern Pacific. In the midst of the Depression on July 24, 1932 train service was reduced to one passenger train out of Portland each day and one train in. The end was near; on May 13, 1933 the last two-car standard train pulled into Jefferson Street station. It was truly the end of an era.

Begun in the midst of the gay nineties, through the roaring twenties the interurban electrics will always be thought of as being a big part of those mystical years in our nation’s history. Very few passengers were on this last trip and only six people showed up when the city refused to renew their franchises. With the closing of the Multnomah Station, the Railway Express service was transferred to the variety store in Multnomah. Portland was very happy; they could now go ahead with their plans to build Harbor Drive along the waterfront on the bed of the old rail line.

At this same time the city obtained the old right of way of the Southern Pacific Railway; they would use that portion of the line to begin work on a new highway that would be Barbur Boulevard, named for the Commissioner of Public Works, A. L. Barbur. The building of this highway employed two thousand men giving them work when so many others were still not working.

It was said the county purposely had them do many things by hand to create new jobs. The highway went southwest three miles and later another three miles to Tigard.

I remember when the highway was being built. My cousin, Margaret Johnson, would take my little sister and me on the four-mile hike from Multnomah to Oaks Park. There were large drainpipes that went under the highway; my sister and I would crawl through them on these occasions, carrying our lunch and a blanket to sit on, to reach the crossing of the Sellwood Bridge.

By the middle of the 1930’s the railway faced a gloomy future with signs of its former glory largely gone. Although passenger service ended, the Oregon Electric worked on increasing their freight business. They were expanding into the heavily timbered areas in the western part of the state. In 1939 16 new steam engines were added to the line for this purpose. In 1941 the Oregon Electric’s service out of Portland officially expired. The S P & S, who owned the Oregon Electric, requested permission to abandon their line connecting Portland to Garden Home and make a direct line from Garden Home to Barbur Boulevard.

In April l941 the Multnomah Community Club met in the offices of Paul M. Rising to begin a series of meetings to study the feasibility of gaining a highway over the present Oregon Electric right of way. Jesse Eaton was appointed chairman to conduct these meetings and study. The Interstate Commerce Commission tentatively granted the Oregon Electric the right to abandon its right of way and discontinue service leading south out of Portland through Multnomah to Garden Home. The commissioners had the authority to declare this right of way a county highway.

Up to this time, road service from the southwest areas to Barbur Boulevard was very inadequate. The members of the committee were anxious to have the railway tracks taken up as soon as possible. There were very few freight trains using the tracks now. By June 1 Chairman Eaton reported that the county road department was making a survey to determine the best approach to Barbur Boulevard, just west of 19th and Barbur. By the middle of June the Commissioner’s Office stated they had approved the measure but did not have the funds to buy the right of way at that time.

World War II brought new life to the Oregon Electric’s freight business as the forest products they carried were now badly needed for the war effort. The end of freight service out of Portland was September 2, 1941. Although a few freight trains used the southwest tracks for a few more years, on March 22, 1944 the Jefferson Street to Garden Home line was officially abandoned and on July 10, 1945 the electric operation ended. The meetings of the Multnomah Community Club temporarily ended because of the war. Over the years that followed, the tracks would be taken up and many of the small shelters given away or torn down. In Garden Home in 1945 Mr. Mattson bought the huge trestles. The large beams were cut into lumber; the pilings were cut and split for fence posts. The large station in Multnomah stood for many years. John’s Market bought the property and John’s Marketplace is there now.

The Oregon Electric freight service continued until it was taken over by the Burlington Northern on May 1, 1981 and continued under that name. When the war ended the Multnomah Community Club again continued efforts to get a roadway along the line of the abandoned railway tracks. Finally, the long campaign for the construction of what would become Multnomah Boulevard moved into its final stages. On January 25, 1949 the county awarded a contract to Edleson and Weygandt Company located at 9233 W. Calvert in Portland with its bid of $84,616.36. Completion date in the contract was for August 31, 1949. The bids included the grading and paving of Multnomah Boulevard from S.W.11th to S.W. 45th Avenue and the grading and paving on S.W. Capitol Highway to S.W. Troy street. Surfacing would be asphalt concrete. An existing frame-bent structure had to be removed and a concrete bridge built. Multnomah Boulevard was a final remembrance of the great Oregon Electric Railway tracks in southwest Portland.

Where Multnomah Boulevard runs into Garden Home road is the place where the train tracks split and where the Garden Home station stood for many years. When the Multnomah Station was built “in the wilderness,” a small town slowly followed. No one would have ever guessed it would eventually become the business center of the entire southwest area. First called Multnomah Station, then the Community of Multnomah, and now Multnomah Village.

Editor: Virginia Mapes, author of Garden Home- the way it was book, quotes Arvid Mattson “My father bought the two trestles at Garden Home in 1945. He dismantled them and had the large beams recut into lumber. The pilings were cut and split for fence posts.” The area where the trestle had been was filled and is now Multnomah Boulevard.

Clark Stephens’ story on our website gives further information regarding the steam trains that continued to move logs on the rail line from Tigard through Garden Home and on west beyond Beaverton: Steam engines were used to haul the logs. It was believed that Southern Pacific owned the straight track from Tigard to Beaverton and they wanted too much money to use the tracks. So the owner of the logs made a deal with Oregon Electric to run on their tracks to Garden Home and then switch and go on into Beaverton and out to Cornelius Pass through the tunnel in the west hills and supply the mills along the Willamette River. That’s why the log trains were coming through Garden Home.

Added by Editor: Elaine Shreve, June 2018

Comment from Patti Waitman-Ingebretsen, Multnomah Historical Treasurer and long time local resident, July 2018: My family moved to a new house on Maplewood Rd in 1950. At that time, Multnomah Blvd stopped at 45th and Garden Home Rd continued to be the road to Garden Home. In the early 1950’s the stretch from SW 45th to Garden Home Rd was paved and most through traffic was then divreted from Garden Home Rd to the new stretch of Multnomah Blvd. The mini strip mall at 45th and Garden Home Rd continued with Albaugh’s Mobil station, Elsie’s diner and at the other end Benton’s Market. 45th Ave Cleaners was in the middle section. As business slowly dwindled, the little shopping mall began to fade. 45th Avenue Cleaners moved to 45th and Multnomah Blvd where it continues business today. The Albaugh family also ran the Mobil station located on the SW corner of Garden Home Rd and Oleson Rd which is currently a Shell station.

Posted in Early History, Historic Events | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Letha (Kidd) Lane and daughter Jacki (Lane) Wisher

Letha Kidd Lane and her daughter, Jacki Lane Wisher, enjoyed remembering their early Garden Home days from the 1960s up until recent times. Shetland ponies, Alpenrose 4th of July pageants, Rusty Nails, Frank Estate (also known as the Frank Farms), Shodeos, and Thriftway pony rides all brought back fond memories.

Letha and her husband, Sanford (Sandy) moved to Garden Home in 1962, just after the October 12th storm; they found lots of downed trees at their newly purchased home at 8005 SW 69th Avenue. The family was looking for a larger home for their four children. This acre-plus property was soon home to two Shetland ponies and their cart, a large garden, fruit trees, fir trees, and a huge black walnut tree valued for its dense shade and eventually wood sales.

Jacki’s dad was out of the Army as a paratrooper in the 81st Airbourne and worked as a bus driver, furnace repairman, railroad switchman and then as a long haul truck driver with his own truck. At a later time, Letha worked at St. Vincent’s Hospital in the early days of coding (ART).

Jacki and her husband Tom Wisher live just a couple blocks away from the home of her childhood, on SW 67th Avenue. Their children Nate and Heidi attended Montclair Elementary School in the 1990s, going on to Whitford and then Beaverton High, graduating in classes 2001 and 2003. Nate was on the Beaverton High School football team who won the state championship in 1999. He also went with the Beaverton High school band to march in the Gator Bowl and Disney Magic Music Days in Florida in 2000 as a member of the drum line.

Kathy and her husband Larry Collins live just down the street from where Kathy grew up on SW Mayo Street. They had 3 children, Kristen, Renee, and Shelby. Kristen was in the first class transferred from Garden Home Elementary School to begin kindergarten in the brand new building of Montclair Elementary School. All 3 of the Collins children attended Montclair Elementary School, Whitford Junior High School, and Beaverton High School. In high school, Kristen was on the tennis team, Renee and Shelby were on the track team.

Jacki, born in 1953, transferred into the Garden Home Elementary School in the fourth grade. Her sibling Kathy, born in 1951, had just completed 6th grade at Beaver Acres Elementary School and was headed to the brand new Whitford Junior High School. Her younger brothers Terry ’56, and Tim ’57 went to the Garden Home Elementary School through the 6th grade, then to Whitford Junior High and graduated from Beaverton High School. Mr. Cheadle was the principal at Garden Home Elementary School most of that time. Jacki remembers entering the school through the east door, walking up the steps into the gym. The original 1912 Garden Home School building was torn down in 1967.

The family enjoyed the daily Alpenrose delivery of milk and dairy products. Shopping was usually done at the local Lamb’s Thriftway.

The two 11 month old registered Shetland ponies, male and female born a day apart from separate mothers, were brought home in the family car in two trips. They also purchased their harness and the pony cart which they drove all over the Garden Home area. Jacki’s favorite thing to do was to ride to the Aaron Frank farm arena and let the ponies run their hearts out around the arena. These ponies and their activities at Alpenrose soon took over the family life. The ponies were named Tony and Glory.

Jacki and her older sister Kathy attended the Northwest Pacific Shetland Shodeo competing in various types of pony games such as jumping, barrel racing, and pole bending. The event Kathy won was “Bridle, Saddle, and GO!” The Butt’s family had a pinto Shetland pony named “Cotton-Eyed-Joe”. That pony would always win all the competition at Alpenrose as their family rode the circuit every year so it was extra special that Kathy won the trophy for the “Bridle, Saddle, and Go!”

Alpenrose sponsored a 4th of July Pageant put on by “Portland Youth for Christ.” Kirby Brumfield was the Producer and Master of Ceremonies at the 4th of July Pageant. Jon Kreitler was the musical director of the Christian performing group “New Americans”, passing the baton along to Roland Boyce later. People came from far and wide to fill the Alpenrose grandstands and enjoy the 4th of July Pageant for several evenings which included many costumes, wagons and ponies. They also enjoyed the Alpenrose Western frontier town buildings and other animals, all for FREE. One chapter of the Pageant portrayed each signer of the Declaration of Independence; the huge draw at the end of the Pageant was the awesome Fireworks for the 4th of July!

Jacki and the fifty or more kids participating in the extravaganza all stayed in large tents on the Alpenrose property. Their ponies stayed in the pony barns. They ate their meals in the Alpenrose owners’personal home. Carl and Virginia Cadanou’s home is still on the property.

Many kids auditioned to join the New American Christian ensemble composed of instruments, dancing and singing directed by John Kreitler. The last year this pageant was produced, Kathy auditioned for the “New Americans” and was accepted to join the group playing her flute in the band.

Alpenrose started the traditional “Easter Egg Hunt” many years ago. A few years ago when Jacki took her young granddaughter to the hunt, she was applauded as having attended these Easter Egg Hunts since the very first one which was over 50 years ago. Alpenrose also brought Rusty Nails and his “medicine show” to the Garden Home Thriftway every summer to entertain children and adults. Let’s never forget the well-known Rusty Nails and his son, Shingle Nails. Jacki and her siblings used to ride their bicycles up to Alpenrose to ride around the Velodrome. During Christmas there was always the “Story Book Lane” with all the baby animals inside all dressed up with fake snow. During the Christmas shows, Jacki used to run the popcorn and the cotton candy machines for sales to the public.

Jacki said her back yard was a huge forest of very tall trees. “We used to shinny up the trees and make them sway for fun. The neighborhood kids used to come over and play “kick the can” in the yard until really late in the evening. Parents never worried about where kids were. We were always playing!”

Other families in Garden Home at the time included a Presbyterian Minister Walker, the Tinkle’s, the Lindahls (Ken, Marge, Arnie, Rick, and Greg), the Shattuck’s, Gail and Lucille Berg, Perkins family,VanTyle’s, and the Russells had horses.

After the Russell family had all graduated from high school, they exchanged houses with the Kevin Freeman family of Olympic equine competition fame. The Freeman’s added a new arena to the property. Kevin competed in the 1964, 1968, and 1972 Olympics, winning silver team medals in 1964 and 1972.

Bill Walker and family moved into Garden Home in 1959 to pursue a job at Tektronix. A few times the neighbors closed off the street for a neighborhood picnic including dancing and music.

Both Letha and her daughter Jacki agree that Garden Home has been a wonderful place to raise families. Although Letha now lives in a retirement facility, she continues to appreciate Garden Home.

By Elaine Shreve with additions by Jacki Wisher. Letha Lane and Jacki Wisher interview conducted May 31, 2018.

For more Alpenrose history:

The Oregonian – 100 years of history at Portland’s Alpenrose Dairy (photos)

Garden Home History – History of the Alpenrose Dairy

Posted in Memoirs, People | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

June 2018 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

Monday, June 11, 6:30 – 8:00 pm. Board meeting at the Garden Home Recreation Center. Visitors welcome.

Saturday, June 16, 10 am – 2 pm. Come and ring the historic 100-year old bell hanging in the bell tower of the Garden Home Marketplace (formerly Lamb’s Thriftway). We will have displays of vintage photos.

Wednesday, June 13, 5:00 – 8:00 pm. Community Night & Summer Camp Open House & Summer Reading Event at the Garden Home Recreation Center, hosted by the Garden Home Recreation Center. Click here for event details.

June 24 to August 19. Summer Scavenger Hunt sponsored by the the Garden Home Recreation Center. Visit the office at the rec center to join the hunt!

Saturday, August 25. Summer Mini Market sponsored by the the Garden Home Recreation Center.

News

Friday, May 18, we held a reception honoring Ginny Mapes, author of Garden Home-the way it was, Traces of the Past and Chakeipi, the story of early Beaverton.  Slides of vintage Garden Home, refreshments and a reunion with classmates and teachers in Garden Home School. Click here to read more and view the full gallery of event photos.

We held our Board of Director’s annual meeting on March 12, and elected our officers:

  • Co-Chairs: Patsy VandeVenter and Elaine Shreve
  • Treasurer: Marie Pacella
  • Secretary: Mark Kajitani
  • Board members:  Stan and Susan Houseman, Jan Fredrickson, Virginia Vanture, Esta Mapes, Louise Cook Jones, and John Pacella
  • Advisory committee members: Bob Cram, Sharon Cram, Tom Shreve, Sharon Vedder, and Carole Vranizan.

Black Rock Coffee Shop: This new enterprise has made its appearance via a huge crane lifting the prefab pieces into place!  This drive-through and table service café is located adjacent to the Buy 2/Shell station on SW Garden Home Road. The exit from the Shell station onto SW Garden Home Rd has been modified to prevent turning left onto SW Garden Home Rd. Harry Pinniger tells us that this was the location of the Garden Home Water District office building before it merged into the Tualatin Valley Water District (Harry served on the Garden Home Water District board).

This Spring: We’re gathering the unique features of Garden Home that we’ll unfold for you in some manner, wonderful surprises! Stay posted for the details.

Other News

Remembering many of our other stories. These fun excerpts from our stories are just samples of the content you can discover browsing our almost 200 articles. We hope you are writing your story for your family.

Colin Lamb: The electricity was off in the Garden Home area for about a week after the Columbus Day storm in 1962. Of course, many homes had no heat so Dad left the presto logs out in the front of the store with a note to pay for them the next day.

Dan Nebert: Therefore, the church window at all times seemed to remain unlocked, so that we were always able to enjoy our rainy Saturday afternoon ping-pong games.

Plane crash: Lt Strong managed to guide the plane over the town of Metzger to what looked like a wooded area before bailing out and landing in some nearby trees unhurt.

Zora and Sharka Becvar: We sat for a little while and, since we did not understand what the teacher was saying, we just looked at each other, got up and left the room and went home.

Bob Feldman: you might have seen young Bob Feldman riding his bike home from Garden Home School precariously toting a pail of slop from the cafeteria to feed his new baby pigs. 

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had five thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Get your Historic Garden Home t-shirt now for just $14 for small to XL. Larger XXL and XXXL sizes are $17. There is an additional charge of $9 to mail your shirt. They’re fun! Available at the Garden Home Market Place.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

Posted in News | Tagged | 1 Comment

Janice Marie Logan obituary

Janice Marie Logan, September 22, 1961 to April 29, 2018

Janice Marie Logan
September 22, 1961 to April 29, 2018

Janice Marie Logan of Portland, passed away peacefully Sunday, April 29, 2018 at Swedish Hospital in Edmonds, Wash., after a year long battle with liver disease. She was 56. She was surrounded and embraced by loving family, close friends and life-partner, Simon in her final hours.

Janice was the youngest of three siblings growing up in Cedar Hills, West of Portland. She attended Cedar Hills Elementary, Cedar Park Intermediate and Sunset High, graduating in 1979. Growing up, Janice enjoyed gymnastics, figure skating, family vacations, playing the clarinet and piano. She was the Editor of the 1979 Sunset High Yearbook. She was a bookworm and read hundreds or thousands of books on a variety of subjects. During the summers of 1976, ’77 and ’78, Janice followed in both brothers’ footsteps working as a “puller” alongside her father on his bright orange commercial salmon fishing dory named “EZ2C.” Upon graduation from Sunset H.S., Janice obtained employment at Nike, Inc. in Beaverton, where she would work for several years. Janice loved rock ‘n’ roll music and attended many concerts of her favorite groups. In the 1980s she enjoyed the Portland nightclub scene and danced to Sequel and other local bands. In ~1985 she earned an appearance on the local Portland TV quiz show On The Spot. Janice was an integral cornerstone in Oregon Motorcycle Road Racing Association (OMRRA) history. She was the President and then Operations Manager for OMRRA from 1994 to 2010. In July of 1997 she realized a life-long dream to be a mother, and gave birth to the apple of her eye, Rayce William Logan. Janice was not religious and at times was irreverent and sarcastic. She did not consider herself spiritual. However, her true humanity shone through in her giving and caring heart. Janice met Simon-Pierre Smith in 2000 who was racing motorcycles at PIR. This meeting would blossom into a mutually loving, life-sharing relationship spanning 18+ years. Janice enjoyed traveling and together with Simon she visited Alaska, Mexico, Russia, France, Spain, etc. She embarked on several ocean cruises with friends, and toured New Zealand and Europe. Janice also criss-crossed the U.S. many times during road trips with Simon and friends. With her wonderful, outgoing, vibrant, positive personality, witty sense of humor and infectious laugh, she was always the center of attention in any social situation. She will be missed terribly by all those who knew and loved her.

Janice is survived by her life partner, Simon-Pierre Smith; son, Rayce; brothers, Tom Logan of Scappoose and Quest Richlife of San Jose, Calif.; nephew, Max Logan (Tom’s son); Rayce’s father, Norm Rindal; and her precious Shiba Inu, Kyra.

A small Remembrance Gathering, organized for family members and close friends only, will take place in the Portland area Saturday, June 2, 2018, at a private residence. No funeral or religious service was desired or planned for. The wishes of her family and close friends will determine the dispensation of her ashes. There is no request for memorial donations.

[Editor’s note: Janice was a valued and enthusiastic of the Garden Home History Project’s Board of Directors. She will be missed greatly.]

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May 2018 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

poster – May 18, 2018 Reception honoring Ginny Mapes

Friday, May 18, 11 am – 1 pm:  Reception honoring Ginny Mapes, author of Garden Home-the way it was, Traces of the Past and Chakeipi, the story of early Beaverton.  Slides of vintage Garden Home, refreshments and a reunion with classmates and teachers in Garden Home School. Click here to read more.

Monday, June 11, 6:30 – 7:15 pm. Free, 30-minute slide show presentation, topic to be announced, followed by Board meeting.

Saturday, June 16, 10 am – 2 pm. Come and ring the historic 100-year old bell hanging in Lamb’s Thriftway Marketplace. We will have displays of vintage photos.

News

We held our Board of Director’s annual meeting on March 12, and elected our officers:

  • Co-Chairs: Patsy VandeVenter and Elaine Shreve
  • Treasurer: Marie Pacella
  • Secretary: Mark Kajitani
  • Board members:  Stan and Susan Houseman, Jan Fredrickson, Virginia Vanture, Esta Mapes, Louise Cook Jones, and John Pacella
  • Advisory committee members: Bob Cram, Sharon Cram, Tom Shreve, Sharon Vedder, and Carole Vranizan.

Black Rock Coffee Shop: This new enterprise has made its appearance via a huge crane lifting the prefab pieces into place!  This drive-through and table service café is located adjacent to the Buy 2/Shell station on SW Garden Home Road. The exit from the Shell station onto SW Garden Home Rd has been modified to prevent turning left onto SW Garden Home Rd. Harry Pinniger tells us that this was the location of the Garden Home Water District office building before it merged into the Tualatin Valley Water District (Harry served on the Garden Home Water District board).

This Spring: We’re gathering the unique features of Garden Home that we’ll unfold for you in some manner, wonderful surprises! Stay posted for the details.

Other News

Remembering many of our other stories. These fun excerpts from our stories are just samples of the content you can discover browsing our almost 200 articles. We hope you are writing your story for your family.

Colin Lamb: The electricity was off in the Garden Home area for about a week after the Columbus Day storm in 1962. Of course, many homes had no heat so Dad left the presto logs out in the front of the store with a note to pay for them the next day.

Dan Nebert: Therefore, the church window at all times seemed to remain unlocked, so that we were always able to enjoy our rainy Saturday afternoon ping-pong games.

Plane crash: Lt Strong managed to guide the plane over the town of Metzger to what looked like a wooded area before bailing out and landing in some nearby trees unhurt.

Zora and Sharka Becvar: We sat for a little while and, since we did not understand what the teacher was saying, we just looked at each other, got up and left the room and went home.

Bob Feldman: you might have seen young Bob Feldman riding his bike home from Garden Home School precariously toting a pail of slop from the cafeteria to feed his new baby pigs. 

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had five thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Get your Historic Garden Home t-shirt now for just $14 for small to XL. Larger XXL and XXXL sizes are $17. There is an additional charge of $9 to mail your shirt. They’re fun! Available at the Garden Home Market Place.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

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May 18, 2018 Reception Honoring Virginia “Ginny” Mapes

Thank you to everyone who attended our meeting of the Washington County History Societies Roundtable, and following reception honoring Ginny Mapes on May 18, 2018 at the Garden Home Recreation Center.

 

poster – May 18, 2018 Reception honoring Ginny Mapes

[Editor: Virginia “Ginny” Mapes authored the first book on the history of Garden Home, Garden Home – the way it was, in 1980. She has gone on to write more books about the history of Garden Home, Beaverton, and Helvetia. Ginny was also the librarian at Garden Home School for many years, fondly remember by thousands of former Garden Home students. Below is a brief memoir shared with us by Ginny.

We are proud to host a reception honoring Ginny at 11:00 AM on Friday, May 18, 2018 at the Garden Home Recreation Center. Free. All are invited.]

Ginny Mapes, 2012 at GHHP celebration of school centennial

I was employed by Beaverton School District as an educator and media specialist for thirty years. As a librarian I loved to take a group of students each year, usually very capable 5th and 6th graders, and create a special program for them. The class met everyday for an hour and was designed to challenge students who might have been bored reading the basal readers in their language art class. Over the years it was filmmaking, puppetry, or Shakespheare plays. In 1979, the students were interested in Backyard History. They started talking with their grandparents and learned some very interesting facts. For instance, there were 62 trains a day going through Garden Home in the 1920s. The stories grew as the students went into high gear researching an interviewing. That is how the book started. We had the help of many volunteers who were willing to go the extra mile with the students and the project. Robert L. Benson, professional historian and cartographer showed students how to create maps. Field trips were planned to Gerry Frank’s Estate and Ross Fogelquist’s home. And so it began . . .  . . . and now it has grown into the Garden Home History Project.

When we published the first book it sold out and we published a second time. More and more people came to us with their stories and that brought about Traces of the Past in 1984.

Here is the listing of books:

  • Mapes, Ginny.  The Tualatins. Hillsboro: Helvetia Community Association 2017.
  • Mapes, Ginny. The Cheesemakers of Helvetia. Hillsboro: Helvetia Community Association. 2017.
  • Mapes, Virginia. Chakeipi: “The Place of the Beaver.” The History of Beaverton Oregon 1893-1993. Tigard: Community Newspapers, Inc. 1993.
  • Mac William, Jill and Virginia Mapes. Traces of the Past: Beaverton, Fanno Creek, Garden Home, McKay, Progress, Whitford.Beaverton: Beaverton School District Print Shop, 1984.
  • Mapes, Virginia. Garden Home ~ The Way It Was. Beaverton: Beaverton School District Print Shop, 1980 and 1982.

Book cover: Garden Home – the way it was. By Ginny Mapes, 1980.

Posted in Events, Memoirs, News, People, School | Tagged , , , | 7 Comments

Billie Herzog Marx obituary

Billie Herzog Marx, March 5, 1928 to April 20, 2018

Billie Herzog Marx, March 5, 1928 to April 20, 2018

Billie Herzog Marx passed away April 20, 2018 at the age of 90.
Billie grew up in Portland and attended Grant High School, Reed College and graduated from the University of Oregon. She spent several years working in San Francisco, but returned to Portland to marry Chuck Marx. They lived in Portland briefly and then moved to Garden Home once their new home was built. Chuck and Billie enjoyed playing tennis and a highlight in their lives, was their trips to Italy and England.

After Chuck passed away in 2002, Billie moved to the Holiday Plaza and lived there until her death. Her interests included reading, rooting for the Trailblazers, attending plays and spending time with her family and friends. She will be greatly missed and remembered fondly by her friends and loved ones. We are sorry to say goodbye to Billie Herzog Marx. If you would like to donate to a charity that Billie supported, contact the Nature Conservancy at 821 S.E. 14th Avenue, 97214.

Billie is survived by Gary, Colorado Springs; Doug and daughter-in-law, Sherree, Vancouver; and one grandson.

 

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April 2018 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

Monday, April 9, 6:30 – 7:15 pm:  Slide presentation celebrating the old church bell’s 100 year anniversary in Garden Home.  We’ll view old Garden Home as we see the bell’s journey from the Community Church to the new Methodist Church to the Lamb’s Thriftway clock tower.  Audience memoirs.  Garden Home Recreation Center, 7475 SW Oleson Road. Free.

Ginny Mapes, 2012 at GHHP celebration of school centennial

Friday, May 18, 11 am – 1 pm:  Reception honoring Ginny Mapes, author of Garden Home-the way it was, Traces of the Past and Chakeipi, the story of early Beaverton.  Slides of vintage Garden Home, refreshments and a reunion with classmates and teachers in Garden Home School. Click here to read more.

Monday, June 11, 6:30 – 7:15 pm. Free, 30-minute slide show presentation, topic to be announced, followed by Board meeting.

Saturday, June 16, 10 am – 2 pm. Come and ring the historic 100-year old bell hanging in Lamb’s Thriftway Marketplace. We will have displays of vintage photos.

News

We held our Board of Director’s annual meeting on March 12, and elected our officers:

  • Co-Chairs: Patsy VandeVenter and Elaine Shreve
  • Treasurer: Marie Pacella
  • Secretary: Mark Kajitani
  • Board members:  Stan and Susan Houseman, Jan Fredrickson, Virginia Vanture, Esta Mapes, Louise Cook Jones, and John Pacella
  • Advisory committee members: Bob Cram, Sharon Cram, Tom Shreve, Sharon Vedder, and Carole Vranizan.

Black Rock Coffee Shop: This new enterprise has made its appearance via a huge crane lifting the prefab pieces into place!  This drive-through and table service café is located adjacent to the Buy 2/Shell station on SW Garden Home Road. The exit from the Shell station onto SW Garden Home Rd has been modified to prevent turning left onto SW Garden Home Rd. Harry Pinniger tells us that this was the location of the Garden Home Water District office building before it merged into the Tualatin Valley Water District (Harry served on the Garden Home Water District board).

This Spring: We’re gathering the unique features of Garden Home that we’ll unfold for you in some manner, wonderful surprises! Stay posted for the details.

Other News

Remembering many of our other stories. These fun excerpts from our stories are just samples of the content you can discover browsing our almost 200 articles. We hope you are writing your story for your family.

Colin Lamb: The electricity was off in the Garden Home area for about a week after the Columbus Day storm in 1962. Of course, many homes had no heat so Dad left the presto logs out in the front of the store with a note to pay for them the next day.

Dan Nebert: Therefore, the church window at all times seemed to remain unlocked, so that we were always able to enjoy our rainy Saturday afternoon ping-pong games.

Plane crash: Lt Strong managed to guide the plane over the town of Metzger to what looked like a wooded area before bailing out and landing in some nearby trees unhurt.

Zora and Sharka Becvar: We sat for a little while and, since we did not understand what the teacher was saying, we just looked at each other, got up and left the room and went home.

Bob Feldman: you might have seen young Bob Feldman riding his bike home from Garden Home School precariously toting a pail of slop from the cafeteria to feed his new baby pigs. 

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had five thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Get your Historic Garden Home t-shirt now for just $14 for small to XL. Larger XXL and XXXL sizes are $17. There is an additional charge of $9 to mail your shirt. They’re fun! Available at the Garden Home Market Place.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

Posted in Events, News | Leave a comment

1936 Aerial Photos of Garden Home area by Army Corp of Engineers

Bob Cram contacted the US Army Corp of Engineers to obtain a series of 1936 aerial photographs of the greater Garden Home area. We just received these and are posting them quickly. We will circle back and annotate the photos to identify the roads, properties and other landmarks.

Posted in Early History | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

Arranmore Development

The Arranmore development of family homes is entered off of Oleson Road just south of Vermont and  the Montclair Grade School at the west end of the Vermont.

The following is an excerpt from an excellent history of the development on the Arranmore home owner’s website.

The Arranmore home sites were developed in three phases.   The idea was conceived by W.C. Bauman, who on april 7th, 1958, purchased the majority of Arranmore acreage from Peter A. and Rosalie Gertsch (husband and wife).  Later, additional acreage was purchased from the Aaron M. Frank estate.  Interestingly though, the Frank property had originally been part of the Gertsch land.  Christian and Katie Gertsch (husband and wife) along with Peter and Rosalie Gertsch sold Aaron Frank a small section on July 6th, 1945. Thirteen years later the Gertsch property was back together as Arranmore.

For more information about the history of the Arranmore property, see the following stories on the Garden Home History website:

Shirley Gertsch Bartels on Peter and Pete Gertsch

Schools in Garden Home Area (see entry on Montclair Elementary)

Aaron Frank Farm

Aaron Frank home article in Sunset Magazine, 1929

Gerry Frank

Below is a gallery of photos from our collection relevant to the Arranmore area.

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