April 2018 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

Monday, April 9, 6:30 – 7:15 pm:  Slide presentation celebrating the old church bell’s 100 year anniversary in Garden Home.  We’ll view old Garden Home as we see the bell’s journey from the Community Church to the new Methodist Church to the Lamb’s Thriftway clock tower.  Audience memoirs.  Garden Home Recreation Center, 7475 SW Oleson Road. Free.

Ginny Mapes, 2012 at GHHP celebration of school centennial

Friday, May 18, 11 am – 1 pm:  Reception honoring Ginny Mapes, author of Garden Home-the way it was, Traces of the Past and Chakeipi, the story of early Beaverton.  Slides of vintage Garden Home, refreshments and a reunion with classmates and teachers in Garden Home School.

Monday, June 11, 6:30 – 7:15 pm. Free, 30-minute slide show presentation, topic to be announced, followed by Board meeting.

Saturday, June 16, 10 am – 2 pm. Come and ring the historic 100-year old bell hanging in Lamb’s Thriftway Marketplace. We will have displays of vintage photos.

News

We held our Board of Director’s annual meeting on March 12, and elected our officers:

  • Co-Chairs: Patsy VandeVenter and Elaine Shreve
  • Treasurer: Marie Pacella
  • Secretary: Mark Kajitani
  • Board members:  Stan and Susan Houseman, Jan Fredrickson, Virginia Vanture, Esta Mapes, Louise Cook Jones, and John Pacella
  • Advisory committee members: Bob Cram, Sharon Cram, Tom Shreve, Sharon Vedder, and Carole Vranizan.

Black Rock Coffee Shop: This new enterprise has made its appearance via a huge crane lifting the prefab pieces into place!  This drive-through and table service café is located adjacent to the Buy 2/Shell station on SW Garden Home Road. The exit from the Shell station onto SW Garden Home Rd has been modified to prevent turning left onto SW Garden Home Rd. Harry Pinniger tells us that this was the location of the Garden Home Water District office building before it merged into the Tualatin Valley Water District (Harry served on the Garden Home Water District board).

This Spring: We’re gathering the unique features of Garden Home that we’ll unfold for you in some manner, wonderful surprises! Stay posted for the details.

Other News

Remembering many of our other stories. These fun excerpts from our stories are just samples of the content you can discover browsing our almost 200 articles. We hope you are writing your story for your family.

Colin Lamb: The electricity was off in the Garden Home area for about a week after the Columbus Day storm in 1962. Of course, many homes had no heat so Dad left the presto logs out in the front of the store with a note to pay for them the next day.

Dan Nebert: Therefore, the church window at all times seemed to remain unlocked, so that we were always able to enjoy our rainy Saturday afternoon ping-pong games.

Plane crash: Lt Strong managed to guide the plane over the town of Metzger to what looked like a wooded area before bailing out and landing in some nearby trees unhurt.

Zora and Sharka Becvar: We sat for a little while and, since we did not understand what the teacher was saying, we just looked at each other, got up and left the room and went home.

Bob Feldman: you might have seen young Bob Feldman riding his bike home from Garden Home School precariously toting a pail of slop from the cafeteria to feed his new baby pigs. 

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had five thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Get your Historic Garden Home t-shirt now for just $14 for small to XL. Larger XXL and XXXL sizes are $17. There is an additional charge of $9 to mail your shirt. They’re fun! Available at the Garden Home Market Place.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

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1936 Aerial Photos of Garden Home area by Army Corp of Engineers

Bob Cram contacted the US Army Corp of Engineers to obtain a series of 1936 aerial photographs of the greater Garden Home area. We just received these and are posting them quickly. We will circle back and annotate the photos to identify the roads, properties and other landmarks.

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Arranmore Development

The Arranmore development of family homes is entered off of Oleson Road just south of Vermont and  the Montclair Grade School at the west end of the Vermont.

The following is an excerpt from an excellent history of the development on the Arranmore home owner’s website.

The Arranmore home sites were developed in three phases.   The idea was conceived by W.C. Bauman, who on april 7th, 1958, purchased the majority of Arranmore acreage from Peter A. and Rosalie Gertsch (husband and wife).  Later, additional acreage was purchased from the Aaron M. Frank estate.  Interestingly though, the Frank property had originally been part of the Gertsch land.  Christian and Katie Gertsch (husband and wife) along with Peter and Rosalie Gertsch sold Aaron Frank a small section on July 6th, 1945. Thirteen years later the Gertsch property was back together as Arranmore.

For more information about the history of the Arranmore property, see the following stories on the Garden Home History website:

Shirley Gertsch Bartels on Peter and Pete Gertsch

Schools in Garden Home Area (see entry on Montclair Elementary)

Aaron Frank Farm

Aaron Frank home article in Sunset Magazine, 1929

Gerry Frank

Below is a gallery of photos from our collection relevant to the Arranmore area.

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February 2018 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

March 12, Monday, 6:30:  Annual meeting, election of officers. Currently:

  • Chair: Patsy VandeVenter
  • Vice-chair:  Elaine Shreve
  • Secretary, Treasurer: Marie Pacella
  • Board members:  Stan and Susan Houseman, Carole Vranizan, Jan Fredrickson, Mark Kajitani, Virginia Vanture

News

Thank you to all who visited us at the December 2 Holiday Bazaar!  We sold all of the historic oatmeal cookie recipe jars.

Black Rock Coffee Shop: This new enterprise has made its appearance via a huge crane lifting the prefab pieces into place!  This drive-through and table service café is located adjacent to the Buy 2/Shell station on SW Garden Home Road. The exit from the Shell station onto SW Garden Home Rd has been modified to prevent turning left onto SW Garden Home Rd. Harry Pinniger tells us that this was the location of the Garden Home Water District office building before it merged into the Tualatin Valley Water District (Harry served on the Garden Home Water District board).

This Spring: We’re gathering the unique features of Garden Home that we’ll unfold for you in some manner, wonderful surprises! Stay posted for the details.

This fall we enjoyed a September presentation on Garden Home through the DecadesThis slide show of work by PCC student Spenser Kuroda features the building history of Garden Home since 1950. Tom Shreve presented this and reference material to an appreciative audience. Spenser’s report can be found on our Resources page.

Our October 9 program, Show and Tell from your family or a Garden Home treasure  brought out some interesting items. Cheryl Clark brought a selection of old bottles she retrieved from what seemed to be an old garbage dump near SW 92nd and Fanno Creek. Anyone else remember this garbage dump? Another find was a secreted old report card, reporting on student bad behavior, presumably hidden from parent eyes!

Other News

Remembering many of our other stories. These fun excerpts from our stories are just samples of the content you can discover browsing our almost 200 articles. We hope you are writing your story for your family.

Colin Lamb: The electricity was off in the Garden Home area for about a week after the Columbus Day storm in 1962. Of course, many homes had no heat so Dad left the presto logs out in the front of the store with a note to pay for them the next day.

Dan Nebert: Therefore, the church window at all times seemed to remain unlocked, so that we were always able to enjoy our rainy Saturday afternoon ping-pong games.

Plane crash: Lt Strong managed to guide the plane over the town of Metzger to what looked like a wooded area before bailing out and landing in some nearby trees unhurt.

Zora and Sharka Becvar: We sat for a little while and, since we did not understand what the teacher was saying, we just looked at each other, got up and left the room and went home.

Bob Feldman: you might have seen young Bob Feldman riding his bike home from Garden Home School precariously toting a pail of slop from the cafeteria to feed his new baby pigs. 

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had 5 thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. March 12 will be a special meeting for the public with refreshments and summaries by the Chair and the Treasurer. The plans for the year’s activities will be shared. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Get your Historic Garden Home t-shirt now for just $14 for small to XL. Larger XXL and XXXL sizes are $17. There is an additional charge of $9 to mail your shirt. They’re fun! Available at the Garden Home Market Place.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

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Bruce Koester

Bruce Koester was born in 1946, married Sandy in 1973 and has three children: Beth, Glen and Carl. Bruce has lived in his grandmother’s home near 62nd and Garden Home Road all of his life. The home was built in 1926 and his grandmother Augusta Matrix Hosner purchased the property in 1927 for $2,500 from Mr. Sabel who owned much of the property in that area. Bruce’s father, Otto Koester, came from Germany and married Augusta’s daughter, Elizabeth in 1928. Both parents died in 1979 and are buried at Crescent Grove Cemetery on Greenburg Road.

This home is in Multnomah County and City of Portland, so Bruce attended school at the Markham Annex building and then Benson High. His dad dropped him off at Benson on his way to work at Avondale Construction in east Portland.

The original garage for the Koester property was located east of the house, where the huge 1.75 million gallon Tualatin Valley Water District’s water tank now stands. This earthquake resistant tank was installed in 2013.

It replaced the two aging 500,000 gallon tanks which were developed in 1952. A row of about 20 very tall sequoia trees delineate the property line from the Koesters; the tiny saplings were planted about a yard apart in 1953. Mr. Sabel had an auto repair business at this location prior to the water tanks.

Neighbors in this general area included: Lily Vantile who was the mother to Jimmy Chevrolet. Eric Johansen who shot her cats after she died. Patsy Sheehan married Bob Jager who worked for Nabisco. Mrs. Clifford was reported to have come from Idaho in a wagon in 1900. This was necessary if the family was moving cattle or horses with them. Mr. Raz was a mechanic at C-Tran in Vancouver. The Raz family was from Switzerland. The Piper family sold their property to the Donners.

Like many homes of the neighborhood, this large lot of almost three quarters of an acre has provided a large garden, berry bushes, a cow, chickens, geese and other small animals. They had a cow until 1952 which his mother milked daily as was the German custom. In Switzerland, the custom was for the man of the house to do the milking. They had to circulate a petition in the neighborhood to get a permit to have a beehive which still produces nice honey.

Bruce’s father Otto Koester was a painter, using the lead based paints of the era. He is remembered to have suffered depressions and was quick to anger. After he retired, the family noted that his personality became much easier. After Bruce read The History of Poison, he believed that his dad had suffered the effects of lead poisoning from his daily contact with lead based paints for over 30 years.

Grocery shopping was generally at John’s Market or the Ben Franklin variety store in Multnomah. Bruce remembers when Throckmorten’s (also called the White store currently on Dairy Queen property in Garden Home) burned in April of 1956. The big wheel of cheese covered by the big glass dome was very inviting. The small store had wooden floors and shelves for the products. The Koester family used a freezer locker rented in the business located in the current Washington Square area at the SE corner of Hall and Scholls Ferry. The Blair family were noted because they were the only family with a freezer in their home. Other shopping was done by taking the bus downtown.

After Throckmorten’s store burned in 1956, a Standard service station went in which brought three service stations to this Garden Home intersection. The (Shari’s) NE corner had the Texaco station and the Mobil station was on the SW corner, home of the current Shell station.

The Columbus Day storm of 1962 left the area without electricity for about two weeks.

In the 1950s the kids played ball on Garden Home Road with only occasional traffic. Baseball was a very popular game. The family got a TV in 1956. They had a wood stove in the kitchen until 1949 and another in the living room.

The neighborhood women of the 1940s and 1950s generally didn’t work outside of the home. And often did not drive the family’s one car. Only three kids in this area were from single parent homes. Bruce’s mother was very active in developing St. Luke’s Lutheran Church at 45th and Garden Home Road, now closed. She also worked on making hooked and braided rugs out of discarded clothing and fabrics. They had a big garden. The Oldtimers club consisted of people from the neighborhood who met about once a month for a potluck.

Bruce’s mother, Elizabeth, usually called Betty, used and worked at Whitney’s Cannery in Garden Home in the 1950s. The Whitney’s would call her in when they had a big load of fruit or vegetables to get canned. The Cannery closed in 1976 when the Whitneys sold it to Frank Comella for a fruit and vegetable business.

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Robert Gertsch

Robert Gertsch was born in 1946. His grandfather and two brothers had settled in Garden Home in the 1890s and developed the early Shattuck Dairy. Robert started Garden Home School in the fourth grade in 1960 and graduated from Beaverton High in 1964. Robert is from the Fritz Gertsch side of the family.

The first Gertsch brothers, Peter, Christian and Fritz came over from Switzerland in the 1890s and Peter settled on the west side of Oleson Road north of Garden Home. Peter married Katy Tannler in 1894 and then unexpectedly died just six weeks after the birth of his first baby, whom they had named Pete to differentiate him from the father. Then according to Swiss custom, the next older boy, Christian, was sent for and he married Katy and they had two more sons, Albert and Christian in addition to Pete. This Pete married Rosalie Balmer and from this marriage, Shirley Gertsch Bartels was born. (See her story) Christian continued working with the Shattuck Dairy that Peter had started. It was located on the current Arranmore development including property north to Vermont Street. Fritz also worked with the Shattuck Dairy after he had earned enough money to purchase property on the east side of Oleson Road in the same area. Read more: Shirley Gertsch Bartels on Peter and Pete Gertsch.

The three brothers, Peter Gertsch 1867-1895, Christian Gertsch 1868-1949 and Fritz Gertsch Sr. 1881- 1954 are all buried at Greenwood Cemetery. Fritz Jr., Robert’s father, was born in 1910 and served in the Army in WWII. He died unexpectedly in ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­1988 as had his father, Fritz Sr. in 1954.

The third brother Fritz, usually called Fred here in America, came from Switzerland in 1898 and achieved citizenship in 1905. He worked very hard for a dairy east on Vermont, possibly the large Hoffman Balmer dairy. After working to develop some savings, Fritz purchased property across Oleson from Christian’s property and began working with Christian at the Shattuck Dairy. This Fritz, Sr. married Rosa Nuelerhoser, thought to be from Switzerland, and had a son Fritz, Jr. who married Olive Philena Wolfe.

Robert and Peter Albert Gertsch were born to Fritz Jr. and Olive Philena Wolfe. This Olive Philena Wolfe was born to Edna Oleson, a daughter of Ole Oleson who owned many acres in this area of Garden Home. Ole and his wife Polly Philena Patton had ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­eight children, one son and seven daughters. Robert remembers his father as a great story-teller, usually with himself as the central figure, embellishing the stories from time to time. Read more: Oleson families.

The Shattuck Dairy property remained in Pete Gertsch’s name. Many other dairies in the area included the Hunziker Dairy and Alpenrose Dairy. The Shattuck Dairy had regular routes for every other day deliveries. They stopped the home delivery service in 1950. After that, Fred Gertsch Jr. then worked for Darigold, going out on the route to pick up 10 gallon cans of milk. Some farmers had cream separators to fill 5 gallon cans. Most of the dairies ceased operation after “the Columbus Day storm” about 1962. Fritz Jr. continued work with the Wilhelm Trucking Company. Read more: Early Dairies by Pete Gertsch.

The Gertsch family members are buried in the Greenwood Cemetery in the South Burlingame area, off of Boones Ferry Road, near Palatine Hill Road. Most of the Oleson’s are buried at the Crescent Grove Cemetery on Greenburg Road, south of Garden Home. The Wolfe family members are buried at the Patton Cemetery, a small historic cemetery across Scholls Ferry Road from the Portland Golf Club.

Aunt Olive Oleson was a “no-nonsense” head nurse and along with her sister Lillian was a graduate of the Good Samaritan Hospital School of Nursing. They both served in WWI in Europe. Robert Gertsch served in the Army and his brother Peter Albert Gertsch served in the Air Force. Read more: Olive Philena Oleson and Lillian Oleson Harris Ruhl.

Robert had wanted to be a machinist and had training to be a welder. He also worked at an auto parts warehouse and as a welder building rail cars. Jobs were hard to get and he finally took the Post Office test. He worked 28 years at the main P.O. on Broadway, near the train station, retiring in 2011.

Grandfather Fritz Sr. had barrels in his basement where he made hard cider, wine and possibly other alcohol drinks during Prohibition. “He liked to have a little nip now and then.” Fritz St. was always able to get good quality whiskey during this period. Robert’s mother, Olive Philena, used to say “Bing Crosby music is not allowed” because Bing had been arrested for some alcohol possession and she thought he was a bad influence on children.

Robert got a lecture from Mr. Thurman, Garden Home School Principal, for fighting. The next year, in 6th grade, he splashed mud over a girl’s dress and had another talk with Mr. Thurman. He was to pay the girl’s family $10 to clean her dress but the family wasn’t concerned and simply washed the dress.

Other memories (please correct our spelling) in the Garden Home area include:

George Olus and Howard Lakanen, schoolmate of Olive Philena, ran the service station in Garden Home in the 1980s, located at the current station lot.

Lynch’s market in Hillsdale was used for grocery shopping.

Robert and friend Lyle Tate were scolded for bouncing a basketball in the ice cream parlor in Garden Mall. Irv Huppin had the pharmacy in that same mall beside the Lamb’s Thriftway.

The Benoits had three sons: Gordon, Stanley and Douglas. After an infraction on the basketball court, one of the boys pulled a pistol out of his jacket.

Harry Namitz did TV repair.

A big Swedish Model Home was a community attraction in the 1950s, located off of Peyton Road, off of Oleson.

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Nancy Donner

Nancy Donner, Nov 8 2017

Nancy and William (Bill) Donner moved to the Garden Home area in 1967 when Bill was transferred with the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers from Walla Walla, Washington. Their large home at SW 62nd and SW Garden Home Road accommodated their five children: Nancy, William, Larry, Madeline and Susan. The home is just inside the Multnomah County line so their children attended Smith Elementary, Jackson Middle School and Wilson High School. One of the early family cars was a two-door Studebaker and more children later, a green Chevy station wagon, no seatbelts or car seats in the 1960s and early 1970s.

The Donner home was a voting precinct in the early days, down in the basement. They also hosted the Corp of Engineers’ annual picnic in the summertime. With their one acre, they had a volley ball court for lots of fun.

Today, a grandson lives with Nancy. Nancy is a participant in Garden Home activities and attends church in Multnomah Village. Her neighbors included Bruce and his mother Betty Koester and formerly, Jewel Lansing and Don Sackett.

Early on in their marriage, Nancy and Bill were stationed in Alaska for about ten years with Bill in the Army Corp of Engineers. During that period, Nancy and a friend enjoyed sending in recipes to enter the Pillsbury Baking contests. Unlike today, the only rule at that time was to use at least one-half cup of Pillsbury flour. Nancy sent in recipes for her Greek shortbread with Ouzo liquor which keeps for a year! Also other recipes for Swedish meatballs and macaroni and cheese with eggs. Her friend won a prize for her cookies.

Nancy knew a lot of Germans who settled Garden Home. Her neighbors had large platted lots with chickens (and still today), a sheep and big gardens and fruit trees. The abundance was shared around the neighborhood. Sometimes, a neighbor would load up a wheel barrow with fruit, especially pears and vegetables and wheel it down the Garden Home Road hill to Whitney’s Cannery for preservation in cans.

The family did their grocery shopping at Mr. and Mrs. Lamb’s Thriftway. Nancy purchased her pots and pans at the hardware store that was associated with the store. If they went to a movie, they went into Portland to one of the downtown theaters. These theaters gave you a plate with each ticket purchased so that with regular attendance, you could build up a set of dishes. Service stations also had this promotion and gave away “depression glass,” a clear colored glass popular in the 1940s and 1950s. Lamb’s Thriftway also enticed you with specially priced china or glass dishes.

For many years, the Donner family welcomed Portland State’s foreign students to come to their home to share in the holidays. As the Donner children grew up and left the bedrooms, she took in foreign students for about 30 years. She now enjoys the many contacts from these students. Nancy speaks French and an older dialect of Italian, the language of her family home.

Nancy fondly recalls the Sunday afternoon activity to go for a ride and visit the relatives, all unannounced ahead of time. Social times were spent playing Canasta, Scrabble or checkers. Doors were not locked and fences did not appear until the 1970s or so.

Social activities with women friends involved going downtown to the Meier & Frank store, sometimes to try on hats. The restroom use required that you pay a small fee to the attendant to unlock the toilet door. You could also summon your youngster to crawl under the door and unlock it to evade the charge. As a special treat, her mother-in-law would take her to lunch or tea in Meier & Frank’s Georgian Room, the ultimate in luxury in Portland. In those days, women dressed up to go downtown never wearing casual pants. The Hilton Hotel might allow a matching pantsuit but never the pants of today.

The Donner family continues to be part of Garden Home along with ties to the Multnomah area and Portland schools. Things are different now, it’s hard to cook for a big group because you have to plan for vegans or people with nut allergies or other special needs.

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Kenneth Thomas Mistler obituary

Kenneth Thomas Mistler, July 29, 1940 to December 27, 2017

Kenneth Thomas Mistler

Kenneth Thomas Mistler passed away Wednesday, Dec. 27, 2017, at St. Vincent’s hospital from complications after heart surgery. He was surrounded by his wife, his daughter and his two sisters.

Ken was born at the original location of that same hospital July 29, 1940, to Marie Cecelia Rasmussen, daughter of Danish immigrant Andy Rasmussen, and his wife, Birdie. He would be followed by sisters, Cindy and Eilleen and brothers, Walter, Terry and Ted, in that order. Kenneth’s father for most of his life was his mother’s second husband, Phillip J. Mistler.

Ken and his brothers and sisters grew up in the Garden Home and Metzger areas, attending Garden Home Grade School and Beaverton High School. For much of high school, he worked at the Chevron service station owned by his uncles, Paul and Wilbur Rasmussen, which still stands at the intersection of Hwy. 99 and 217.

He was the first person in his family to attend college, putting himself through Portland State University as the nighttime manager of the downtown YMCA. It was while working at the YMCA that he met his first wife, the nighttime switchboard operator and a fellow student at PSU, Kathy Simer, with whom he had one child, a daughter named Mickey, born in 1967.

After PSU, they worked hard to put him through Lewis & Clark Law School, where he was one of the founding editors of the first environmental law review in the country. He would sometimes show people the letter he received from President Nixon commending him on this achievement.

Kenneth received a special dispensation from the Oregon State Bar to start working as a Deputy District Attorney for Washington County before he’d actually had a chance to take the bar exam, which he said really put the pressure on to pass it (which he did).

Prosecuting criminals was rewarding, but emotionally grueling work. He often described his job as mostly prosecuting men for hurting their wives, girlfriends and children. Eventually, he decided to quit the law and went into real estate, founding his own real estate brokerage, Oregon First, which he grew to one of the largest in the state.

It was at Oregon First that Kenneth met and married his second wife, Mary Louise Monahan, over 27 years ago. With her, he shares four more children, 12 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren, all of whom he loved very much.

Kenneth was buried in a private ceremony at the same cemetery as both his sets of grandparents. He will be greatly missed for his sense of humor; his desire to learn from others and to share his knowledge with them; his commitment to doing the right thing, even when it’s difficult; and most of all, his kindness.

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Ernilie Storrs obituary

Gladys Ernilie Burgess Storrs July 17, 1924 to April 16, 2017

Gladys Enilie Burgess Storrs July 17, 1924 to April 16, 2017

Gladys Ernilie Burgess Storrs was born on July 17, 1924 in Tacoma, WA. She never used her first name; 5 minutes after she came home to Puyallup, her three big brothers decided her name was Ernie. And it stuck.

Ernie worked in Seattle at Boeing Field during WWII and met her husband James Storrs while traveling from Puyallup to Seattle on the bus. They dated until he was shipped to the South Pacific and married soon after his return. They settled in Newberg, Oregon until about 1958 when they moved to Garden Home.

Ernie was very active with Home Extension as well as a quilting group that met at the local church. She just recently was presented with her 59 year pin for Extension. Quite an honor. She made a number of quilts for the new babies  of friends and other lucky folks, and also finished several quilts that had been pieced by her mother and grandmother.

She was an active member of the Hillsdale Community Church, United Church of Christ and took great enjoyment in attending various functions there.

She passed away suddenly and unexpectedly in the early hours of Easter Sunday leaving behind her daughter Lori Snyder (Kevan), and son Brian Storrs.

A Celebration of Life was held at the church. She is interred at Willamette Cemetery with her beloved Jim. Donations in Remembrance could be made to the American Cancer Society or the Al Kader Shriners Ladder of Smiles.

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January 2018 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

Feb. 12, Monday, 6:30 pm:  Virginia Vanture will be presenting a thirty minute slide show on the old Cannery.  The Old Market Brew Pub now occupies the building at the confluence of Multnomah Blvd. and Garden Home Road.

March 12, Monday, 6:30:  Annual meeting, election of officers. Currently:

  • Chair: Patsy VandeVenter
  • Vice-chair:  Elaine Shreve
  • Secretary, Treasurer: Marie Pacella
  • Board members:  Stan and Susan Houseman, Carole Vranizan, Jan Fredrickson, Mark Kajitani, Virginia Vanture

News

Dorothy Johnson Stevens and Pat Boone – 2017

Our Holiday greetings to all of our Garden Home friends and families.  Thank you for sharing your stories and photos.  Thank you for your interest, your attendance at our many events and your donations to sustain our historical research and community education.  Thank you to our Board of Directors for their diligent efforts to present our history.

This greeting from Dorothy Johnson Stevens reminds us of a young Garden Home girl who became Miss Oregon in 1955.  Her dad had the service station and she lived next door. She went on to become the first runner-up for Miss America and then on to Hollywood!  She starred in Bernadine along with Pat Boone, and still a beauty!

Thank you to all who visited us at the December 2 Holiday Bazaar!  We sold all of the historic oatmeal cookie recipe jars.

Black Rock Coffee Shop: This new enterprise has made its appearance via a huge crane lifting the prefab pieces into place!  This drive-through and table service café is located adjacent to the Buy 2/Shell station on SW Garden Home Road. The exit from the Shell station onto SW Garden Home Rd has been modified to prevent turning left onto SW Garden Home Rd. Harry Pinniger tells us that this was the location of the Garden Home Water District office building before it merged into the Tualatin Valley Water District (Harry served on the Garden Home Water District board).

This Spring: We’re gathering the unique features of Garden Home that we’ll unfold for you in some manner, wonderful surprises! Stay posted for the details.

This fall we enjoyed a September presentation on Garden Home through the DecadesThis slide show of work by PCC student Spenser Kuroda features the building history of Garden Home since 1950. Tom Shreve presented this and reference material to an appreciative audience. Spenser’s report can be found on our Resources page.

Our October 9 program, Show and Tell from your family or a Garden Home treasure  brought out some interesting items. Cheryl Clark brought a selection of old bottles she retrieved from what seemed to be an old garbage dump near SW 92nd and Fanno Creek. Anyone else remember this garbage dump? Another find was a secreted old report card, reporting on student bad behavior, presumably hidden from parent eyes!

Other News

Remembering many of our other stories. These fun excerpts from our stories are just samples of the content you can discover browsing our almost 200 articles. We hope you are writing your story for your family.

Colin Lamb: The electricity was off in the Garden Home area for about a week after the Columbus Day storm in 1962. Of course, many homes had no heat so Dad left the presto logs out in the front of the store with a note to pay for them the next day.

Dan Nebert: Therefore, the church window at all times seemed to remain unlocked, so that we were always able to enjoy our rainy Saturday afternoon ping-pong games.

Plane crash: Lt Strong managed to guide the plane over the town of Metzger to what looked like a wooded area before bailing out and landing in some nearby trees unhurt.

Zora and Sharka Becvar: We sat for a little while and, since we did not understand what the teacher was saying, we just looked at each other, got up and left the room and went home.

Bob Feldman: you might have seen young Bob Feldman riding his bike home from Garden Home School precariously toting a pail of slop from the cafeteria to feed his new baby pigs. 

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had 5 thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. March 12 will be a special meeting for the public with refreshments and summaries by the Chair and the Treasurer. The plans for the year’s activities will be shared. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Get your Historic Garden Home t-shirt now for just $14 for small to XL. Larger XXL and XXXL sizes are $17. There is an additional charge of $9 to mail your shirt. They’re fun! Available at the Garden Home Market Place.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

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Mary Helen Himes Koeber

1932 Mary Helen Himes, Lincoln High School graduation. Courtesy Mary Helen Himes Koeber. See post.

1932 Mary Helen Himes, Lincoln High School graduation.
Courtesy Mary Helen Himes Koeber. See post.

Mary Helen Himes Koeber (1913-2017)

[Update: Mary Helen passed away on May 7, 2017. She was a beautician and opened the first beauty shop in Beaverton. She attended Garden Home and Hillsboro grade schools, graduating from Lincoln High School in Portland. Her grandfather was George Himes, one of the original curators of the Oregon Historical Society.

She is survived by her sister Grace (Himes) McInnis and her sons Ivan, George and Robert Koeber. Also numerous grandchildren, great grandchildren, nephews and nieces. A memorial was held in Himes Park on Terwilliger Boulevard.]

Centenarian Mary Helen Himes (born Sept. 28, 1913) and her mother Vera L. Prince Himes (died 1988) and father Claridge Holcomb Himes (died in accident 1927) moved to Garden Home for two years in about 1919 to 1921. She lived on Royal Avenue (71st now) along with her siblings George Richard, Claridge Holcomb, and Grace Emma on an acre plot. She attended first and second grade at Garden Home School. Her teacher was Mary Lehman. A neighbor Evelyn Simpkins Biles lived across the street.

Her father, Claridge H. Himes took the Oregon Electric into Portland to work at the Fleischner-Mayer, a dry goods store in today’s Old Town. This store was built in 1906 and stands today at 115 NW First Avenue, Portland. He later worked at the Meier & Frank (now Macy’s) retail store. Her mother, Vera Prince Himes, raised the children and taught piano.

Hairdresser: In 1923, the Himes family moved to Hillsboro. They were lucky to have one car during the Depression. “Dad would take the car to work and everyone else walked everywhere.”  Mary Helen graduated from Lincoln High School. In those days when you graduated from high school, if you weren’t going to college, you went to California. Two of her siblings went there and she spent a few years in San Francisco and liked the city.

After graduation, Mary Helen went to Sanitary Beauty School for six months and $50 and then passed the State Board examination to be a hairdresser. She had a salon in her home after she was married and came to know lots of the early residents in the area.

Pioneer families: Although Mary Helen will be 100 on Sept. 28, 2013 she lives independently in Beaverton. She appreciates the help that her sons George, Robert, and Ivan Ted Koeber provide. Mary Helen’s family and relatives were important early pioneers of the area and are illustrative of the contributions of our early families.

Tyrus and Emeline Himes were  Mary Helen’s paternal great grandparents. George H. Himes, her grandfather, has the middle name of Holcomb, the maiden name of his mother Emeline Holcomb Himes, from the very early and distinguished Holcomb family, pilgrim settlers of 1635.  George’s parents  Tyrus, b. 1818,d. 1879, and Emeline Himes, b. 1821, began their journey west in 1853 with their four children and horse and ox teams. They experienced many hardships including loss of stock and limited provisions. Their wagon train of thirty-six wagons and seventy-five people crossed the Natchez Pass (Nevada) over an undeveloped trail and finally arrived in Olympia, Washington in 1853.

George Holcomb Himes: Mary Helen’s paternal grandfather George H. Himes as a young man worked in rail making, wood cutting and other labors in clearing land on his parent’s donation land claim east of Olympia. Although he had limited education, he aspired to learn the printing trade and began at the Washington Standard, a paper published in Olympia. After his apprenticeship, he moved down to The Oregonian in Portland and in 1870 began his own business “Himes, the Printer.” In 1898 George was a founding member of the Oregon Historical Society and the first and long-time curator.

George Holcomb Himes, b. 5-18-1844, d. 1940, married Anna F. Riggs, d. 1933, from Eola, a small community west of Salem, and raised 5 daughters and one son Claridge H. Himes. Anna’s family came to Portland in 1859 by steamer from New York and settled on a ranch in Eola, west of Salem, Polk County. A family notation says “Grandpa met Anna at the ranch while stopping for dinner in 1865.  He was 23 when married and she was 17 or 18.” George and Anna had 11 children, eight of which survived: Edna Emeline, Sarah Myrtle, Mary, Grace Helen, Claridge Holcomb (father of Mary Helen), Mildred Florence, Fay Celestial and Lurah Margaret.

OHS Curator: George H. Himes is honored as one of the founding members of the Oregon Historical Society and was the first curator, a position he held for over 54 years. A Portland city park along SW Terwilliger Boulevard bears his name as did the Liberty ship George H. Himes. In 1943 the ship was built in the Oregon shipyards for World War II in the amazing time of 28 days.  It was torpedoed in Guadalcanal and finally scrapped in 1964.  His extensive documents, papers and diaries are archived at the Oregon Historical Society. “A dedicated diarist, he kept a daily record of his life, beginning at the age of fourteen and continuing until his death at ninety-five.” 1

Slavin family: Mary Helen’s father Claridge Holcomb Himes, 7-7-1881 to 1927 married her mother, Vera Prince, who died in 1988. Vera’s father is Richard C. Prince, pictured.   Vera’s mother, Mary Slavin Prince, was from the early pioneer family of John A. Slavin. John Slavin started for California in 1850 but ended up buying his way down the Columbia in a small boat provided he would pull one oar. 2  John married Emma Ross in 1852.

They took a donation land claim at the corner of Clackamas, Washington and Multnomah counties. He built a cabin and large barn off of Slavin Road at what is now Capitol Highway and Sunset Boulevard, approximately in the location of the Hillsdale Library. Slavin Road was a major early road leading into Portland and a portion of it was changed to Capitol Highway.  Slavin Road continues in a multiple housing area just east of Barbur Boulevard near Hamilton.

In 1884 John and Emma Slavin enlarged the little house in the woods, building a good farm house. They had six children including Mary Slavin Prince, Mary Helen’s maternal grandmother.

John A. Slavin barn on Slavin Road. Courtesy Mary Helen Himes Koeber. See post.

John A. Slavin barn on Slavin Road.
Courtesy Mary Helen Himes Koeber. See post.

1884 residence of John and Emma Ruth Ross Slavin, Hillsdale. Courtesy Mary Helen Himes Koeber. See post.

1884 residence of John and Emma Ruth Ross Slavin, Hillsdale.
Courtesy Mary Helen Himes Koeber. See post.

Resources:

  • Photos from family
  • 1.  http://www.oregonencyclopedia.org/George Himes, written by Geoffrey Wexler
  • 2.  Illustrated History of Oregon/John A. Slavin
  • genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/infleischner
  • Rev.H.K. Hines. Illustrated History of the State of Oregon, 1893.  Lewis Publishing Company.
  • http://www.slavens.net/bios/john_a_slavin.htm
  • Portland Parks, George Himes Park Trail System
  • Thanks to Julie Bishop (Amy Northrop’s mom) Raz connection, to confirm location of Slavin barn, house.
  • Thanks to Katherine McDonald for October interview with Mrs. Koeber

By Elaine Shreve, 2013

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Patricia Joanne James Gossett obituary

Patricia Joanne James Gossett, August 6, 1931 to August 27, 2012

Pattijo was born at Emanuel Hospital to Leonard and Mary Huffsmith. She attended Ockley Green Grade School, Jefferson High and Lewis and Clark College, receiving her nursing degree at Emanuel Hospital. She is survived by her husband, Lane; her son and daughter-in-law, Kevin and Karin James of Seattle; daughter, Leslie Younger; grandson, Jacob Younger; great-grandchildren, Trinity and Tristan Gossett; and her loving extended family. She was predeceased by her brother, Jim Huffsmith. Pattijo’s career at Emanuel Hospital spanned 32 years. She then taught for five years at the College of Legal Arts. She was a member of the Emanuel Hospital School of Nursing Alumni Association, the Association of Volunteer Registered Nurses and was a regular attendee at the Good Friends Club luncheon. In retirement, she did what she’d always done – looked out for people, volunteering at Emanuel and Ronald McDonald House. She was a lover of life, keeper of the faith, follower of the rainbow, believer in good, guardian of those in need and a friend to all. Pattijo was one of a kind. A service will be held at Lewis and Clark College in the Agnes Flanagan Chapel on Sunday, Sept. 16, 2012 at 2 p.m. with a reception following. In lieu of flowers, please honor Pattijo with a contribution to Ronald McDonald House.

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Delores Jarvis obituary

Delores Jarvis, January 11, 1930 to November 4, 2017

Delores Jarvis (1930-2017)

Delores was born Jan. 11, 1930, the first child of George and Dora Olson of Warren, Ore. She died of complications from Parkinson’s disease Nov. 4, 2017 at her home of 58 years in Garden Home with family and friends at her side.

Delores was a gifted vocalist who sang with a trio in a swing band at events in the Portland/Vancouver areas. She was also quite the beauty, representing Columbia County in the Miss Oregon Pageant.

John Jarvis “Jack” and Delores were married in 1954. Five years later they purchased their property in Garden Home where they would raise their four children.

In the early ’60s Delores was invited by a childhood friend to a new church they were starting. She attended the first service of West Hills Covenant which was held in the parsonage.

On Jan. 4, 1971 Jack died of Melanoma leaving her with their four children ranging in age from five to 11. She leaned into her relationship with God along with her vibrant church community to sustain herself and her kids.

Following Jack’s death Delores began working full-time for Beaverton Schools cafeteria services. She did this until she retired in 1992.

Delores’ home was open to all and created a safe haven of encouragement for many to grow in. Her children were raised with community surrounding them because of the rich relationships that Delores cultivated.

Delores was prayerful, intentional, decisive, wise and humble. She loved her life and those she shared it with. She was a friend to everyone that she met and was consistently present in every moment.

She leaves a legacy of joy that was uncontainable. It permeated everything she did.
Delores is survived by her sister, Lois (Gaylon) Bledsoe; children, Andrea Jarvis, Lisa (Mike) Leslie, David (Jill) Jarvis, Dana (Steve) Nasralla; 10 grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; Wayne and Ruth Smith, and many other friends.

A memorial celebration will be held at 2 p.m., Dec. 2, 2017, at West Hills Covenant Church 5815 S.W. Gillcrest Ct., Portland, OR 97221

Donations to the West Hills Covenant church deacon fund are welcome.

This obituary appeared in The Oregonian, November 2017 (source). Used with permission from Jarvis family.

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Log cabins of Garden Home

There are several log cabins in Garden Home:

  • Fogelbo (Foglequist residence) on SW Oleson Road
  • Stefanicgrimbso residence on SW Garden Home Road
  • George residence on SW 87th Avenue
  • Two on (or near) SW Florence Lane (which we have not yet investigated)

Fogelbo log cabin

Fogelbo is located at 8740 SW Oleson Road, nestled on a couple acres of mature trees, shrubs and flowers. It is called Fogelbo (bird nest) which is derived from the family name of Fogelquist. Henry Steiner built the log cabin in the late 1930s and it was purchased by the Fogelquists in 1952. Steiner worked on Timberline Lodge and built other well-known Steiner cabins on Mt. Hood.

Fogelbo has become a center of Swedish and Scandinavian culture and activities. The New Sweden Cultural Heritage Soceity is next door. The blue and yellow Swedish flag flies on the front flagpole. Washington County designated Fogelbo as a historical site in 1978.  Fogelbo has hosted hundreds of events over the years and thousands of people have enjoyed the home and hospitality and learned something about the Swedish culture.

Stefanicgrimbso log cabin

Melissa and Joshua Stefanicgrimsbo purchased property at 8550 SW Garden Home Road in 2009. They were told by the realtor that the original room was built in 1930 and additions made later. The original room is the log cabin made with 10” logs. The well-house out back still has the pumping equipment. The garage probably was a smallish barn. Mrs. Herzog, the former neighbor to the west, said this was the original farm home for the filbert orchard in this area. Another neighbor, Judy George, lives in a 1900 log cabin home on SW 87th Avenue.

Bob Feldman grew up in the 1940s on the Fanno Creek Dairy at SW 88th Avenue and SW Garden Home Road. He remembers:

In the 1930s, the log cabin at 8550 SW Garden Home Road was called the Hamilton place although Mr. Hamilton was commonly called “Snoose.”  He was a very large man and a musician playing the accordion and other instruments.

Bob thinks that a Brown family owned the land before that.

George log cabin

Judy George lives in the oldest house on the portion of 87th going south to Alden from Garden Home Road.  Judy agrees with the County records which state that the home was  built in 1900.  Judy understood that the original house was a one room log cabin, possibly her current dining room.  The walls in the living room are knotty pine which has, over time, darkened so beautifully.  A well-built fireplace is on one wall and a beautiful stovepipe flue cover is on the opposite wall, near the ceiling where it would be used for a cook stove or heating stove. The back porch bears witness to the log cabin construction of the house.  The logs were not peeled of their bark and the bark has slowly eroded over time.  The chinks between the logs are visible in the photographs.

The exterior of the home has been sided over.  Decorative faux log siding covers the north exterior wall.

 

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November 2017 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find over a hundred stories and over a thousand photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Rainbow over the Garden Home Recreation center – photo by Jill Vaughan, 2017

Upcoming Events

Garden Home recipe books

Saturday, December 2, Holiday Bazaar, 9-4:  Look for us in room 7 of Garden Home Rec. Center.  We’ll have historic recipe treats all ready for your holiday baking! And free treats and bookmarks. We always enjoy meeting Garden Home people.

News

This fall we enjoyed a September presentation on Garden Home through the DecadesThis slide show of work by PCC student Spenser Kuroda features the building history of Garden Home since 1950. Tom Shreve presented this and reference material to an appreciative audience. Spenser’s report can be found on our Resources page.

Our October 9 program, Show and Tell from your family or a Garden Home treasure  brought out some interesting items. Cheryl Clark brought a selection of old bottles she retrieved from what seemed to be an old garbage dump near SW 92nd and Fanno Creek. Anyone else remember this garbage dump? Another find was a secreted old report card, reporting on student bad behavior, presumably hidden from parent eyes!

Other News

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had 5 thirty-minute slide presentations last year from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. March 13 will be a special meeting for the public with refreshments and summaries by the Chair and the Treasurer. The plans for the year’s activities will be shared. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Get your Historic Garden Home t-shirt now for just $14 for small to XL. Larger XXL and XXXL sizes are $17. There is an additional charge of $9 to mail your shirt. They’re fun! Available at the Garden Home Market Place.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

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Fanno family biography

Fanno is an important name here in our southwest Portland community. The Fanno Creek Trail follows the historic Oregon Electric Railroad track bed that crosses Fanno Creek. The trail then connects to the Tualatin Hills Park and Recreation District’s (THPRD) path which leads to Greenway Park, adjacent to the Fanno Farmhouse at 8405 SW Creekside Place, Beaverton, OR 97008. This is the oldest existing house in the city of Beaverton and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Fanno Farmhouse, owned and maintained by THPRD, can be found by turning south off of Hall Boulevard at Creekside Place, the street just west of Nimbus. The house was designed and constructed by Augustus Fanno in 1859 and was occupied by the Fanno family until 1979. The house was built with sawn lumber from Thomas H. Denney’s local sawmill, Rebecca Denney Fanno’s brother.

Augustus Fanno: The “first” Augustus Fanno was born on March 26, 1804 in Maine. His father John Fanno and family had emigrated from France during the French Revolution of 1790s. This Augustus was married to Martha Ferguson in 1838. They came West with their five year old son Eugene in one of the earliest wagon trains in 1846. Martha (and baby) died shortly upon arrival during childbirth in Linn City (now West Linn). Augustus (and possibly son Eugene) explored the territory on west of the Willamette to the coast and staked his donation land claim of 640 acres in 1847. This area came to be known as the Tualatin Valley, home to the Kalapuya Indians. The Indians had camped and fished for years in this area before disease and new exclusion laws decimated their welfare.

Augustus then married Rebecca Jane Denney in 1851. Her family had joined with a number of other families from the same neighborhood in southern Indiana. Some of these historic names are familiar today: Denney, Stott, Tucker, and McKay.

The first Augustus Fanno had served at sea for a number of years and then taught school in Missouri. In Oregon, he drained some of the beavers’ swampy land and farmed the eastern yellow Danvers onion by careful selection of bulbs over a period of twenty years, until he developed an onion which would keep in the damp climate. He was known to be honest and industrious and welcomed new settlers to provide children for a school. He was the first deputy sheriff appointed to Washington County and director of the local school.

Children: Augustus’ and Rebecca’s children who reached adulthood included boys Augustus and Alonzo and girls Zantaphine and Ziona . This second Augustus married Kate Guerin and had one child, Helen. Alonzo’s son Frank began a line of Fanno men continuing today with Dwight Fanno of Eagle Creek (story below) and his sons including Peter Rutherford Fanno, U.S. Navy. Many persons of the Fanno family are buried in the Crescent Grove Cemetery on Greenburg Road just south of Garden Home (see list).

Augustus and Rebecca’s sons Augustus and his brother Alonzo continued with the onion farming. Family lore remembers that this Augustus enjoyed the moniker “Onion King” and printed up cards which he handed out on the street. Other sources say that the Onion King title was given to the first Augustus. Family stories tell of the onion shipments to the Klondike gold rush of 1898 in the Yukon area. Some documents refer to the California gold rush of 1848 which would have been early in the onion cultivation farming.

Eugene Fanno, by greatgrandson Robert Fanno: As an adult, Eugene, the son of the first marriage whose mother died, became known in the local family as a “Mountain Man” and later lived in California where his son established the Fanno Saw Works. We talked with Robert Fanno of Chico, California, the current owner of the Fanno Saw Works and a direct descendant of the first Augustus Fanno. Robert is the son of Carl Fanno 1911-1976, who was the son of Asa Augustus Fanno who was the son of Eugene Fanno.

Fanno Saw Works logo

Eugene Fanno had four children including Eugene, Jr., Asa Augustus, Lena and two more. Eugene seems to have been somewhat estranged from the original family, worked in the Oregon coast range woods in the Valsetz area of Oregon where there is a Fanno Ridge and Fanno Peak Road. Asa Augustus Fanno, Robert’s grandfather, was a mill wright on a paddle boat and worked in boat building. He settled in Chico, California about 1900 and soon purchased an almond orchard. His first saws and long pole pruners were used on the nut trees and he developed the Fanno Saw Works.

Dwight Fanno: We were pleased to talk with Dwight Rutherford Fanno, a direct descendant of the original Augustus Fanno who first came to Oregon in 1846 and claimed his donation land claim in 1847 southwest of the the larger Garden Home area. This has been called the Progress area. This land claim of 640 acres was signed by Abraham Lincoln.

Dwight Fanno’s father was Norman Fanno 1932-2001, son of Frank Fanno 1902-1984, who was the son of Alonzo Fanno 1861-1949, the brother of Augustus Fanno 1855-1923 and who both shared in the inheritance of the Fanno farm and house. This Augustus and Alonzo were the sons of the original Augustus, 1804-1884, who came to Oregon in 1845 or 1846.

Dwight and his three siblings lived in the Fanno farmhouse, built in 1859, and farmed the remaining 85 acres with cattle and hay. The onion maggot had decimated the onion growing. During his early years, Dwight attended McKay School, Whitford Junior High and graduated from Beaverton High in 1974. He currently lives in the Estacada area where he has a home construction business. He consulted with his mother Gladys Fanno for some details of this story.

The Indians camped in an oak tree area NE of the Fanno farmhouse. Natural salt deposits in the soil attracted birds and animals. The first Augustus told about shooting deer from his front step. At one time, a research study on the large band-tailed pigeons was done in this area. This whole area of the previous farm is now occupied by businesses and family residences in addition to the Greenway Park along the Fanno Creek Trail. The area is subject to flooding and the beavers have returned to Fanno Creek in the Greenway area.

References:

Interview with Dwight Fanno, August 2017 by Elaine Shreve.

Telephone interview with Robert Fanno, Aug. 30, 2017 by Elaine Shrevce.

National Register of Historic Places Inventory Augustus Fanno Farmhouse, 1984.

Family documents provided by Judy Denney Donovan, 2017.

Matt Miner, Seen in the Vista Brook Park pond this morning: 2017, comment on Nextdoor Garden Home:

8:00am. One great blue heron standing in the center of the pond, circled by a small flotilla of baby ducks commanded by their mother, the admiral. Another heron, sitting off to the left, poking at the water looking for breakfast. A crow swoops in, squawking at the top of its lungs. Just then a coyote briefly steps out of the brush on the far side of the pond. A nature documentary right in your own back yard.

Books

Both books available through the Washington County Libraries:

Lindstrom, Eric L. (2012) Up Fanno Creek, Confessions of an Accidental Advocate. Printed by On Demand Books. In this fascinating book Dr. Lindstrom takes us along on his recent research into the history and realities of Fanno Creek and its tributaries. We learn of the Kalapuya Indians and their subgroup the Atfalati Indians who lived in our larger Garden Home and Tualatin area, the Missoula Floods, Fanno family life and our current concerns with the Portland sewage pump stations.

The author talks with our neighbors, investigates our streams and recalls his own early life in understanding the Fannos. The book explores the businesses, the people, the history, and the many factors affecting Fanno Creek and its tributaries in the middle of a highly developed city and suburbs. The two major tributaries are Ash Creek and Summer Creek. A wonderful resource.

Blowers, Joe (2000) “Fish Stories” The Historical Occurrence of Salmonids in the Fanno Creek Watershed Printed by 501 (c) (3) Fans of Fanno Creek, P.O. Box 25835, Portland, OR 97225. This report includes a map and an aerial photo of middle Fanno Creek. Many people experienced in identifying fish and habitat were interviewed and documented. At this 1999 research date, a steelhead was sighted in Fanno Creek at the Vista Brook Park by an employee of Oregon Fish and Wildlife. A chart documents the type of fish species seen in Fanno Creek over the last 50 years.

Virginia Mapes (1993) CHAKEIPI, The Place of the Beaver.  Published by City of Beaverton, Printed by Community Newspapers, Inc. Tigard, Oregon. This excellent well-researched book by our local historian covers the history of the Beaverton area and the early pioneers. Many photos, sketches, and maps. The story of Beaverton’s Bernard Airport in (now) downtown Beaverton reminds us how recent “history” has occurred.

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Steve Mapes obituary

Steve Mapes, February 18, 1942 to July 19, 2017

Steve Mapes, February 18, 1942 to July 19, 2017

Steve grew up in Garden Home and Tigard where he graduated from high school in 1960.  After studying at the University of Oregon and Portland State, he married Esta Anderson in 1965.  They moved back to Garden Home where they raised their two children, Kevin and Kelli.  Steve worked as a supervisor for the Portland Water Bureau, where he retired in 1998.

Steve was an avid runner, completing several marathons, cheering on the Ducks and Trail Blazers and supporting his children in their activities.  Steve and Esta traveled the world and loved returning to their beach house at Road’s End.  Steve was a wonderful community member and could always be counted on for Garden Home activities.  Memorials to Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

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Lucille E. Adams obituary

Lucille E. Adams, January 20, 1925 to August 10, 2017

Lucille E. Adams Jan 20, 1925 to Aug 10, 2017

Lucille was the wife of Culmer “John” Adams and shared in his history.  John’s grandparents lived on the north side of SW Garden Home Road just east of the Thriftway store property in the 1930s and ‘40s.

She attended Jefferson High School.  Early in their marriage they lost everything in the Vanport flood but moved on to raise their family in the Beaverton area.  She was preceded in death by her husband and siblings and survived by her children Susan, Cathleen,  and Jeffrey and their families.

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July 30, 2017 Ice Cream Social

Ice Cream Social, July 30, 2017 from 1:pm to 3:pm on a Sunday afternoon:  We had a wonderful time outside on the playground, under the new overhead cover, meeting our neighbors and friends and enjoying free ice cream cones. We had almost 150 people attend to chat with one another and peruse the historic displays and albums of Garden Home School children. The school closed in 1982, 35 years ago, the balloons on our poster being released that day. Thanks to chairpersons Patsy VandeVenter and Carole Vranizan who were assisted by members of the Garden Home History Project Board.

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May 21, 2017 Crescent Grove Cemetery Tour

We enjoyed our May 21 tour of early Garden Home pioneer graves at the Crescent Grove Cemetery. A beautiful day, four guides reviewed the histories of over two dozen of our brave pioneers, most of whom came out on the Oregon trail. Our tour guides were Mark Kajatani, Janice Logan, Susan Houseman, and Elaine Shreve. Judy and Dan Donovan appeared in pioneer costume and spoke about the Denny family.

Thanks to all our volunteers and tour attendees!

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