June 2018 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

Monday, June 11, 6:30 – 8:00 pm. Board meeting at the Garden Home Recreation Center. Visitors welcome.

Saturday, June 16, 10 am – 2 pm. Come and ring the historic 100-year old bell hanging in the bell tower of the Garden Home Marketplace (formerly Lamb’s Thriftway). We will have displays of vintage photos.

Wednesday, June 13, 5:00 – 8:00 pm. Community Night & Summer Camp Open House & Summer Reading Event at the Garden Home Recreation Center, hosted by the Garden Home Recreation Center. Click here for event details.

June 24 to August 19. Summer Scavenger Hunt sponsored by the the Garden Home Recreation Center. Visit the office at the rec center to join the hunt!

Saturday, August 25. Summer Mini Market sponsored by the the Garden Home Recreation Center.

News

Friday, May 18, we held a reception honoring Ginny Mapes, author of Garden Home-the way it was, Traces of the Past and Chakeipi, the story of early Beaverton.  Slides of vintage Garden Home, refreshments and a reunion with classmates and teachers in Garden Home School. Click here to read more and view the full gallery of event photos.

We held our Board of Director’s annual meeting on March 12, and elected our officers:

  • Co-Chairs: Patsy VandeVenter and Elaine Shreve
  • Treasurer: Marie Pacella
  • Secretary: Mark Kajitani
  • Board members:  Stan and Susan Houseman, Jan Fredrickson, Virginia Vanture, Esta Mapes, Louise Cook Jones, and John Pacella
  • Advisory committee members: Bob Cram, Sharon Cram, Tom Shreve, Sharon Vedder, and Carole Vranizan.

Black Rock Coffee Shop: This new enterprise has made its appearance via a huge crane lifting the prefab pieces into place!  This drive-through and table service café is located adjacent to the Buy 2/Shell station on SW Garden Home Road. The exit from the Shell station onto SW Garden Home Rd has been modified to prevent turning left onto SW Garden Home Rd. Harry Pinniger tells us that this was the location of the Garden Home Water District office building before it merged into the Tualatin Valley Water District (Harry served on the Garden Home Water District board).

This Spring: We’re gathering the unique features of Garden Home that we’ll unfold for you in some manner, wonderful surprises! Stay posted for the details.

Other News

Remembering many of our other stories. These fun excerpts from our stories are just samples of the content you can discover browsing our almost 200 articles. We hope you are writing your story for your family.

Colin Lamb: The electricity was off in the Garden Home area for about a week after the Columbus Day storm in 1962. Of course, many homes had no heat so Dad left the presto logs out in the front of the store with a note to pay for them the next day.

Dan Nebert: Therefore, the church window at all times seemed to remain unlocked, so that we were always able to enjoy our rainy Saturday afternoon ping-pong games.

Plane crash: Lt Strong managed to guide the plane over the town of Metzger to what looked like a wooded area before bailing out and landing in some nearby trees unhurt.

Zora and Sharka Becvar: We sat for a little while and, since we did not understand what the teacher was saying, we just looked at each other, got up and left the room and went home.

Bob Feldman: you might have seen young Bob Feldman riding his bike home from Garden Home School precariously toting a pail of slop from the cafeteria to feed his new baby pigs. 

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had five thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Get your Historic Garden Home t-shirt now for just $14 for small to XL. Larger XXL and XXXL sizes are $17. There is an additional charge of $9 to mail your shirt. They’re fun! Available at the Garden Home Market Place.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

Advertisements
Posted in News | Tagged | 1 Comment

Development of SW Multnomah Boulevard

Editor: This story, written by Lowell Swanson, was first printed in the Multnomah Historical Society’s Winter 2005 newsletter. The story was retrieved for us by Tim Lyman, their Chair, and is printed with his permission. It validates the date and process of discontinuing the railroad through Multnomah and pulling the rail tracks east of the Garden Home Station and Multnomah Boulevard developed. The contract for construction of Multnomah Blvd scheduled completion by August, 1949. See end of story for additional notes.

Development of Multnomah Boulevard

On May 26, 1931 the Oregon Electric was permitted to abandon its tracks from the Hoyt Street Station to the Jefferson Street Station. It was May 23, 1906 when the franchise had been given for the Portland tracks; it was dying after twenty five years. These were the years of the Great Depression, which certainly did not help. Although the Oregon Electric seldom made a profit in its own right, it still generated revenue to owner Hill and his other lines, the S P & S, the Great Northern, and the Northern Pacific. In the midst of the Depression on July 24, 1932 train service was reduced to one passenger train out of Portland each day and one train in. The end was near; on May 13, 1933 the last two-car standard train pulled into Jefferson Street station. It was truly the end of an era.

Begun in the midst of the gay nineties, through the roaring twenties the interurban electrics will always be thought of as being a big part of those mystical years in our nation’s history. Very few passengers were on this last trip and only six people showed up when the city refused to renew their franchises. With the closing of the Multnomah Station, the Railway Express service was transferred to the variety store in Multnomah. Portland was very happy; they could now go ahead with their plans to build Harbor Drive along the waterfront on the bed of the old rail line.

At this same time the city obtained the old right of way of the Southern Pacific Railway; they would use that portion of the line to begin work on a new highway that would be Barbur Boulevard, named for the Commissioner of Public Works, A. L. Barbur. The building of this highway employed two thousand men giving them work when so many others were still not working.

It was said the county purposely had them do many things by hand to create new jobs. The highway went southwest three miles and later another three miles to Tigard.

I remember when the highway was being built. My cousin, Margaret Johnson, would take my little sister and me on the four-mile hike from Multnomah to Oaks Park. There were large drainpipes that went under the highway; my sister and I would crawl through them on these occasions, carrying our lunch and a blanket to sit on, to reach the crossing of the Sellwood Bridge.

By the middle of the 1930’s the railway faced a gloomy future with signs of its former glory largely gone. Although passenger service ended, the Oregon Electric worked on increasing their freight business. They were expanding into the heavily timbered areas in the western part of the state. In 1939 16 new steam engines were added to the line for this purpose. In 1941 the Oregon Electric’s service out of Portland officially expired. The S P & S, who owned the Oregon Electric, requested permission to abandon their line connecting Portland to Garden Home and make a direct line from Garden Home to Barbur Boulevard.

In April l941 the Multnomah Community Club met in the offices of Paul M. Rising to begin a series of meetings to study the feasibility of gaining a highway over the present Oregon Electric right of way. Jesse Eaton was appointed chairman to conduct these meetings and study. The Interstate Commerce Commission tentatively granted the Oregon Electric the right to abandon its right of way and discontinue service leading south out of Portland through Multnomah to Garden Home. The commissioners had the authority to declare this right of way a county highway.

Up to this time, road service from the southwest areas to Barbur Boulevard was very inadequate. The members of the committee were anxious to have the railway tracks taken up as soon as possible. There were very few freight trains using the tracks now. By June 1 Chairman Eaton reported that the county road department was making a survey to determine the best approach to Barbur Boulevard, just west of 19th and Barbur. By the middle of June the Commissioner’s Office stated they had approved the measure but did not have the funds to buy the right of way at that time.

World War II brought new life to the Oregon Electric’s freight business as the forest products they carried were now badly needed for the war effort. The end of freight service out of Portland was September 2, 1941. Although a few freight trains used the southwest tracks for a few more years, on March 22, 1944 the Jefferson Street to Garden Home line was officially abandoned and on July 10, 1945 the electric operation ended. The meetings of the Multnomah Community Club temporarily ended because of the war. Over the years that followed, the tracks would be taken up and many of the small shelters given away or torn down. In Garden Home in 1945 Mr. Mattson bought the huge trestles. The large beams were cut into lumber; the pilings were cut and split for fence posts. The large station in Multnomah stood for many years. John’s Market bought the property and John’s Marketplace is there now.

The Oregon Electric freight service continued until it was taken over by the Burlington Northern on May 1, 1981 and continued under that name. When the war ended the Multnomah Community Club again continued efforts to get a roadway along the line of the abandoned railway tracks. Finally, the long campaign for the construction of what would become Multnomah Boulevard moved into its final stages. On January 25, 1949 the county awarded a contract to Edleson and Weygandt Company located at 9233 W. Calvert in Portland with its bid of $84,616.36. Completion date in the contract was for August 31, 1949. The bids included the grading and paving of Multnomah Boulevard from S.W.11th to S.W. 45th Avenue and the grading and paving on S.W. Capitol Highway to S.W. Troy street. Surfacing would be asphalt concrete. An existing frame-bent structure had to be removed and a concrete bridge built. Multnomah Boulevard was a final remembrance of the great Oregon Electric Railway tracks in southwest Portland.

Where Multnomah Boulevard runs into Garden Home road is the place where the train tracks split and where the Garden Home station stood for many years. When the Multnomah Station was built “in the wilderness,” a small town slowly followed. No one would have ever guessed it would eventually become the business center of the entire southwest area. First called Multnomah Station, then the Community of Multnomah, and now Multnomah Village.

Editor: Virginia Mapes, author of Garden Home- the way it was book, quotes Arvid Mattson “My father bought the two trestles at Garden Home in 1945. He dismantled them and had the large beams recut into lumber. The pilings were cut and split for fence posts.” The area where the trestle had been was filled and is now Multnomah Boulevard.

Clark Stephens’ story on our website gives further information regarding the steam trains that continued to move logs on the rail line from Tigard through Garden Home and on west beyond Beaverton: Steam engines were used to haul the logs. It was believed that Southern Pacific owned the straight track from Tigard to Beaverton and they wanted too much money to use the tracks. So the owner of the logs made a deal with Oregon Electric to run on their tracks to Garden Home and then switch and go on into Beaverton and out to Cornelius Pass through the tunnel in the west hills and supply the mills along the Willamette River. That’s why the log trains were coming through Garden Home.

Added by Editor: Elaine Shreve, June 2018

Posted in Early History, Historic Events | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Letha (Kidd) Lane and daughter Jacki (Lane) Wisher

Letha Kidd Lane and her daughter, Jacki Lane Wisher, enjoyed remembering their early Garden Home days from the 1960s up until recent times. Shetland ponies, Alpenrose 4th of July pageants, Rusty Nails, Frank Estate (also known as the Frank Farms), Shodeos, and Thriftway pony rides all brought back fond memories.

Letha and her husband, Sanford (Sandy) moved to Garden Home in 1962, just after the October 12th storm; they found lots of downed trees at their newly purchased home at 8005 SW 69th Avenue. The family was looking for a larger home for their four children. This acre-plus property was soon home to two Shetland ponies and their cart, a large garden, fruit trees, fir trees, and a huge black walnut tree valued for its dense shade and eventually wood sales.

Jacki’s dad was out of the Army as a paratrooper in the 81st Airbourne and worked as a bus driver, furnace repairman, railroad switchman and then as a long haul truck driver with his own truck. At a later time, Letha worked at St. Vincent’s Hospital in the early days of coding (ART).

Jacki and her husband Tom Wisher live just a couple blocks away from the home of her childhood, on SW 67th Avenue. Their children Nate and Heidi attended Montclair Elementary School in the 1990s, going on to Whitford and then Beaverton High, graduating in classes 2001 and 2003. Nate was on the Beaverton High School football team who won the state championship in 1999. He also went with the Beaverton High school band to march in the Gator Bowl and Disney Magic Music Days in Florida in 2000 as a member of the drum line.

Kathy and her husband Larry Collins live just down the street from where Kathy grew up on SW Mayo Street. They had 3 children, Kristen, Renee, and Shelby. Kristen was in the first class transferred from Garden Home Elementary School to begin kindergarten in the brand new building of Montclair Elementary School. All 3 of the Collins children attended Montclair Elementary School, Whitford Junior High School, and Beaverton High School. In high school, Kristen was on the tennis team, Renee and Shelby were on the track team.

Jacki, born in 1953, transferred into the Garden Home Elementary School in the fourth grade. Her sibling Kathy, born in 1951, had just completed 6th grade at Beaver Acres Elementary School and was headed to the brand new Whitford Junior High School. Her younger brothers Terry ’56, and Tim ’57 went to the Garden Home Elementary School through the 6th grade, then to Whitford Junior High and graduated from Beaverton High School. Mr. Cheadle was the principal at Garden Home Elementary School most of that time. Jacki remembers entering the school through the east door, walking up the steps into the gym. The original 1912 Garden Home School building was torn down in 1967.

The family enjoyed the daily Alpenrose delivery of milk and dairy products. Shopping was usually done at the local Lamb’s Thriftway.

The two 11 month old registered Shetland ponies, male and female born a day apart from separate mothers, were brought home in the family car in two trips. They also purchased their harness and the pony cart which they drove all over the Garden Home area. Jacki’s favorite thing to do was to ride to the Aaron Frank farm arena and let the ponies run their hearts out around the arena. These ponies and their activities at Alpenrose soon took over the family life. The ponies were named Tony and Glory.

Jacki and her older sister Kathy attended the Northwest Pacific Shetland Shodeo competing in various types of pony games such as jumping, barrel racing, and pole bending. The event Kathy won was “Bridle, Saddle, and GO!” The Butt’s family had a pinto Shetland pony named “Cotton-Eyed-Joe”. That pony would always win all the competition at Alpenrose as their family rode the circuit every year so it was extra special that Kathy won the trophy for the “Bridle, Saddle, and Go!”

Alpenrose sponsored a 4th of July Pageant put on by “Portland Youth for Christ.” Kirby Brumfield was the Producer and Master of Ceremonies at the 4th of July Pageant. Jon Kreitler was the musical director of the Christian performing group “New Americans”, passing the baton along to Roland Boyce later. People came from far and wide to fill the Alpenrose grandstands and enjoy the 4th of July Pageant for several evenings which included many costumes, wagons and ponies. They also enjoyed the Alpenrose Western frontier town buildings and other animals, all for FREE. One chapter of the Pageant portrayed each signer of the Declaration of Independence; the huge draw at the end of the Pageant was the awesome Fireworks for the 4th of July!

Jacki and the fifty or more kids participating in the extravaganza all stayed in large tents on the Alpenrose property. Their ponies stayed in the pony barns. They ate their meals in the Alpenrose owners’personal home. Carl and Virginia Cadanou’s home is still on the property.

Many kids auditioned to join the New American Christian ensemble composed of instruments, dancing and singing directed by John Kreitler. The last year this pageant was produced, Kathy auditioned for the “New Americans” and was accepted to join the group playing her flute in the band.

Alpenrose started the traditional “Easter Egg Hunt” many years ago. A few years ago when Jacki took her young granddaughter to the hunt, she was applauded as having attended these Easter Egg Hunts since the very first one which was over 50 years ago. Alpenrose also brought Rusty Nails and his “medicine show” to the Garden Home Thriftway every summer to entertain children and adults. Let’s never forget the well-known Rusty Nails and his son, Shingle Nails. Jacki and her siblings used to ride their bicycles up to Alpenrose to ride around the Velodrome. During Christmas there was always the “Story Book Lane” with all the baby animals inside all dressed up with fake snow. During the Christmas shows, Jacki used to run the popcorn and the cotton candy machines for sales to the public.

Jacki said her back yard was a huge forest of very tall trees. “We used to shinny up the trees and make them sway for fun. The neighborhood kids used to come over and play “kick the can” in the yard until really late in the evening. Parents never worried about where kids were. We were always playing!”

Other families in Garden Home at the time included a Presbyterian Minister Walker, the Tinkle’s, the Lindahls (Ken, Marge, Arnie, Rick, and Greg), the Shattuck’s, Gail and Lucille Berg, Perkins family,VanTyle’s, and the Russells had horses.

After the Russell family had all graduated from high school, they exchanged houses with the Kevin Freeman family of Olympic equine competition fame. The Freeman’s added a new arena to the property. Kevin competed in the 1964, 1968, and 1972 Olympics, winning silver team medals in 1964 and 1972.

Bill Walker and family moved into Garden Home in 1959 to pursue a job at Tektronix. A few times the neighbors closed off the street for a neighborhood picnic including dancing and music.

Both Letha and her daughter Jacki agree that Garden Home has been a wonderful place to raise families. Although Letha now lives in a retirement facility, she continues to appreciate Garden Home.

By Elaine Shreve with additions by Jacki Wisher. Letha Lane and Jacki Wisher interview conducted May 31, 2018.

For more Alpenrose history:

The Oregonian – 100 years of history at Portland’s Alpenrose Dairy (photos)

Garden Home History – History of the Alpenrose Dairy

Posted in Memoirs, People | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Janice Marie Logan obituary

Janice Marie Logan, September 22, 1961 to April 29, 2018

Janice Marie Logan
September 22, 1961 to April 29, 2018

Janice Marie Logan of Portland, passed away peacefully Sunday, April 29, 2018 at Swedish Hospital in Edmonds, Wash., after a year long battle with liver disease. She was 56. She was surrounded and embraced by loving family, close friends and life-partner, Simon in her final hours.

Janice was the youngest of three siblings growing up in Cedar Hills, West of Portland. She attended Cedar Hills Elementary, Cedar Park Intermediate and Sunset High, graduating in 1979. Growing up, Janice enjoyed gymnastics, figure skating, family vacations, playing the clarinet and piano. She was the Editor of the 1979 Sunset High Yearbook. She was a bookworm and read hundreds or thousands of books on a variety of subjects. During the summers of 1976, ’77 and ’78, Janice followed in both brothers’ footsteps working as a “puller” alongside her father on his bright orange commercial salmon fishing dory named “EZ2C.” Upon graduation from Sunset H.S., Janice obtained employment at Nike, Inc. in Beaverton, where she would work for several years. Janice loved rock ‘n’ roll music and attended many concerts of her favorite groups. In the 1980s she enjoyed the Portland nightclub scene and danced to Sequel and other local bands. In ~1985 she earned an appearance on the local Portland TV quiz show On The Spot. Janice was an integral cornerstone in Oregon Motorcycle Road Racing Association (OMRRA) history. She was the President and then Operations Manager for OMRRA from 1994 to 2010. In July of 1997 she realized a life-long dream to be a mother, and gave birth to the apple of her eye, Rayce William Logan. Janice was not religious and at times was irreverent and sarcastic. She did not consider herself spiritual. However, her true humanity shone through in her giving and caring heart. Janice met Simon-Pierre Smith in 2000 who was racing motorcycles at PIR. This meeting would blossom into a mutually loving, life-sharing relationship spanning 18+ years. Janice enjoyed traveling and together with Simon she visited Alaska, Mexico, Russia, France, Spain, etc. She embarked on several ocean cruises with friends, and toured New Zealand and Europe. Janice also criss-crossed the U.S. many times during road trips with Simon and friends. With her wonderful, outgoing, vibrant, positive personality, witty sense of humor and infectious laugh, she was always the center of attention in any social situation. She will be missed terribly by all those who knew and loved her.

Janice is survived by her life partner, Simon-Pierre Smith; son, Rayce; brothers, Tom Logan of Scappoose and Quest Richlife of San Jose, Calif.; nephew, Max Logan (Tom’s son); Rayce’s father, Norm Rindal; and her precious Shiba Inu, Kyra.

A small Remembrance Gathering, organized for family members and close friends only, will take place in the Portland area Saturday, June 2, 2018, at a private residence. No funeral or religious service was desired or planned for. The wishes of her family and close friends will determine the dispensation of her ashes. There is no request for memorial donations.

[Editor’s note: Janice was a valued and enthusiastic of the Garden Home History Project’s Board of Directors. She will be missed greatly.]

Posted in News, Obituaries, People | Tagged , | Leave a comment

May 2018 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

poster – May 18, 2018 Reception honoring Ginny Mapes

Friday, May 18, 11 am – 1 pm:  Reception honoring Ginny Mapes, author of Garden Home-the way it was, Traces of the Past and Chakeipi, the story of early Beaverton.  Slides of vintage Garden Home, refreshments and a reunion with classmates and teachers in Garden Home School. Click here to read more.

Monday, June 11, 6:30 – 7:15 pm. Free, 30-minute slide show presentation, topic to be announced, followed by Board meeting.

Saturday, June 16, 10 am – 2 pm. Come and ring the historic 100-year old bell hanging in Lamb’s Thriftway Marketplace. We will have displays of vintage photos.

News

We held our Board of Director’s annual meeting on March 12, and elected our officers:

  • Co-Chairs: Patsy VandeVenter and Elaine Shreve
  • Treasurer: Marie Pacella
  • Secretary: Mark Kajitani
  • Board members:  Stan and Susan Houseman, Jan Fredrickson, Virginia Vanture, Esta Mapes, Louise Cook Jones, and John Pacella
  • Advisory committee members: Bob Cram, Sharon Cram, Tom Shreve, Sharon Vedder, and Carole Vranizan.

Black Rock Coffee Shop: This new enterprise has made its appearance via a huge crane lifting the prefab pieces into place!  This drive-through and table service café is located adjacent to the Buy 2/Shell station on SW Garden Home Road. The exit from the Shell station onto SW Garden Home Rd has been modified to prevent turning left onto SW Garden Home Rd. Harry Pinniger tells us that this was the location of the Garden Home Water District office building before it merged into the Tualatin Valley Water District (Harry served on the Garden Home Water District board).

This Spring: We’re gathering the unique features of Garden Home that we’ll unfold for you in some manner, wonderful surprises! Stay posted for the details.

Other News

Remembering many of our other stories. These fun excerpts from our stories are just samples of the content you can discover browsing our almost 200 articles. We hope you are writing your story for your family.

Colin Lamb: The electricity was off in the Garden Home area for about a week after the Columbus Day storm in 1962. Of course, many homes had no heat so Dad left the presto logs out in the front of the store with a note to pay for them the next day.

Dan Nebert: Therefore, the church window at all times seemed to remain unlocked, so that we were always able to enjoy our rainy Saturday afternoon ping-pong games.

Plane crash: Lt Strong managed to guide the plane over the town of Metzger to what looked like a wooded area before bailing out and landing in some nearby trees unhurt.

Zora and Sharka Becvar: We sat for a little while and, since we did not understand what the teacher was saying, we just looked at each other, got up and left the room and went home.

Bob Feldman: you might have seen young Bob Feldman riding his bike home from Garden Home School precariously toting a pail of slop from the cafeteria to feed his new baby pigs. 

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had five thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Get your Historic Garden Home t-shirt now for just $14 for small to XL. Larger XXL and XXXL sizes are $17. There is an additional charge of $9 to mail your shirt. They’re fun! Available at the Garden Home Market Place.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

Posted in News | Tagged , | Leave a comment

May 18, 2018 Reception Honoring Virginia “Ginny” Mapes

Thank you to everyone who attended our meeting of the Washington County History Societies Roundtable, and following reception honoring Ginny Mapes on May 18, 2018 at the Garden Home Recreation Center.

 

poster – May 18, 2018 Reception honoring Ginny Mapes

[Editor: Virginia “Ginny” Mapes authored the first book on the history of Garden Home, Garden Home – the way it was, in 1980. She has gone on to write more books about the history of Garden Home, Beaverton, and Helvetia. Ginny was also the librarian at Garden Home School for many years, fondly remember by thousands of former Garden Home students. Below is a brief memoir shared with us by Ginny.

We are proud to host a reception honoring Ginny at 11:00 AM on Friday, May 18, 2018 at the Garden Home Recreation Center. Free. All are invited.]

Ginny Mapes, 2012 at GHHP celebration of school centennial

I was employed by Beaverton School District as an educator and media specialist for thirty years. As a librarian I loved to take a group of students each year, usually very capable 5th and 6th graders, and create a special program for them. The class met everyday for an hour and was designed to challenge students who might have been bored reading the basal readers in their language art class. Over the years it was filmmaking, puppetry, or Shakespheare plays. In 1979, the students were interested in Backyard History. They started talking with their grandparents and learned some very interesting facts. For instance, there were 62 trains a day going through Garden Home in the 1920s. The stories grew as the students went into high gear researching an interviewing. That is how the book started. We had the help of many volunteers who were willing to go the extra mile with the students and the project. Robert L. Benson, professional historian and cartographer showed students how to create maps. Field trips were planned to Gerry Frank’s Estate and Ross Fogelquist’s home. And so it began . . .  . . . and now it has grown into the Garden Home History Project.

When we published the first book it sold out and we published a second time. More and more people came to us with their stories and that brought about Traces of the Past in 1984.

Here is the listing of books:

  • Mapes, Ginny.  The Tualatins. Hillsboro: Helvetia Community Association 2017.
  • Mapes, Ginny. The Cheesemakers of Helvetia. Hillsboro: Helvetia Community Association. 2017.
  • Mapes, Virginia. Chakeipi: “The Place of the Beaver.” The History of Beaverton Oregon 1893-1993. Tigard: Community Newspapers, Inc. 1993.
  • Mac William, Jill and Virginia Mapes. Traces of the Past: Beaverton, Fanno Creek, Garden Home, McKay, Progress, Whitford.Beaverton: Beaverton School District Print Shop, 1984.
  • Mapes, Virginia. Garden Home ~ The Way It Was. Beaverton: Beaverton School District Print Shop, 1980 and 1982.

Book cover: Garden Home – the way it was. By Ginny Mapes, 1980.

Posted in Events, Memoirs, News, People, School | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

Billie Herzog Marx obituary

Billie Herzog Marx, March 5, 1928 to April 20, 2018

Billie Herzog Marx, March 5, 1928 to April 20, 2018

Billie Herzog Marx passed away April 20, 2018 at the age of 90.
Billie grew up in Portland and attended Grant High School, Reed College and graduated from the University of Oregon. She spent several years working in San Francisco, but returned to Portland to marry Chuck Marx. They lived in Portland briefly and then moved to Garden Home once their new home was built. Chuck and Billie enjoyed playing tennis and a highlight in their lives, was their trips to Italy and England.

After Chuck passed away in 2002, Billie moved to the Holiday Plaza and lived there until her death. Her interests included reading, rooting for the Trailblazers, attending plays and spending time with her family and friends. She will be greatly missed and remembered fondly by her friends and loved ones. We are sorry to say goodbye to Billie Herzog Marx. If you would like to donate to a charity that Billie supported, contact the Nature Conservancy at 821 S.E. 14th Avenue, 97214.

Billie is survived by Gary, Colorado Springs; Doug and daughter-in-law, Sherree, Vancouver; and one grandson.

 

Posted in News, Obituaries, People | Tagged , | Leave a comment

April 2018 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

Monday, April 9, 6:30 – 7:15 pm:  Slide presentation celebrating the old church bell’s 100 year anniversary in Garden Home.  We’ll view old Garden Home as we see the bell’s journey from the Community Church to the new Methodist Church to the Lamb’s Thriftway clock tower.  Audience memoirs.  Garden Home Recreation Center, 7475 SW Oleson Road. Free.

Ginny Mapes, 2012 at GHHP celebration of school centennial

Friday, May 18, 11 am – 1 pm:  Reception honoring Ginny Mapes, author of Garden Home-the way it was, Traces of the Past and Chakeipi, the story of early Beaverton.  Slides of vintage Garden Home, refreshments and a reunion with classmates and teachers in Garden Home School. Click here to read more.

Monday, June 11, 6:30 – 7:15 pm. Free, 30-minute slide show presentation, topic to be announced, followed by Board meeting.

Saturday, June 16, 10 am – 2 pm. Come and ring the historic 100-year old bell hanging in Lamb’s Thriftway Marketplace. We will have displays of vintage photos.

News

We held our Board of Director’s annual meeting on March 12, and elected our officers:

  • Co-Chairs: Patsy VandeVenter and Elaine Shreve
  • Treasurer: Marie Pacella
  • Secretary: Mark Kajitani
  • Board members:  Stan and Susan Houseman, Jan Fredrickson, Virginia Vanture, Esta Mapes, Louise Cook Jones, and John Pacella
  • Advisory committee members: Bob Cram, Sharon Cram, Tom Shreve, Sharon Vedder, and Carole Vranizan.

Black Rock Coffee Shop: This new enterprise has made its appearance via a huge crane lifting the prefab pieces into place!  This drive-through and table service café is located adjacent to the Buy 2/Shell station on SW Garden Home Road. The exit from the Shell station onto SW Garden Home Rd has been modified to prevent turning left onto SW Garden Home Rd. Harry Pinniger tells us that this was the location of the Garden Home Water District office building before it merged into the Tualatin Valley Water District (Harry served on the Garden Home Water District board).

This Spring: We’re gathering the unique features of Garden Home that we’ll unfold for you in some manner, wonderful surprises! Stay posted for the details.

Other News

Remembering many of our other stories. These fun excerpts from our stories are just samples of the content you can discover browsing our almost 200 articles. We hope you are writing your story for your family.

Colin Lamb: The electricity was off in the Garden Home area for about a week after the Columbus Day storm in 1962. Of course, many homes had no heat so Dad left the presto logs out in the front of the store with a note to pay for them the next day.

Dan Nebert: Therefore, the church window at all times seemed to remain unlocked, so that we were always able to enjoy our rainy Saturday afternoon ping-pong games.

Plane crash: Lt Strong managed to guide the plane over the town of Metzger to what looked like a wooded area before bailing out and landing in some nearby trees unhurt.

Zora and Sharka Becvar: We sat for a little while and, since we did not understand what the teacher was saying, we just looked at each other, got up and left the room and went home.

Bob Feldman: you might have seen young Bob Feldman riding his bike home from Garden Home School precariously toting a pail of slop from the cafeteria to feed his new baby pigs. 

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had five thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Get your Historic Garden Home t-shirt now for just $14 for small to XL. Larger XXL and XXXL sizes are $17. There is an additional charge of $9 to mail your shirt. They’re fun! Available at the Garden Home Market Place.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

Posted in Events, News | Leave a comment

1936 Aerial Photos of Garden Home area by Army Corp of Engineers

Bob Cram contacted the US Army Corp of Engineers to obtain a series of 1936 aerial photographs of the greater Garden Home area. We just received these and are posting them quickly. We will circle back and annotate the photos to identify the roads, properties and other landmarks.

Posted in Early History | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

Arranmore Development

The Arranmore development of family homes is entered off of Oleson Road just south of Vermont and  the Montclair Grade School at the west end of the Vermont.

The following is an excerpt from an excellent history of the development on the Arranmore home owner’s website.

The Arranmore home sites were developed in three phases.   The idea was conceived by W.C. Bauman, who on april 7th, 1958, purchased the majority of Arranmore acreage from Peter A. and Rosalie Gertsch (husband and wife).  Later, additional acreage was purchased from the Aaron M. Frank estate.  Interestingly though, the Frank property had originally been part of the Gertsch land.  Christian and Katie Gertsch (husband and wife) along with Peter and Rosalie Gertsch sold Aaron Frank a small section on July 6th, 1945. Thirteen years later the Gertsch property was back together as Arranmore.

For more information about the history of the Arranmore property, see the following stories on the Garden Home History website:

Shirley Gertsch Bartels on Peter and Pete Gertsch

Schools in Garden Home Area (see entry on Montclair Elementary)

Aaron Frank Farm

Aaron Frank home article in Sunset Magazine, 1929

Gerry Frank

Below is a gallery of photos from our collection relevant to the Arranmore area.

Posted in Homes | Tagged | Leave a comment

February 2018 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

March 12, Monday, 6:30:  Annual meeting, election of officers. Currently:

  • Chair: Patsy VandeVenter
  • Vice-chair:  Elaine Shreve
  • Secretary, Treasurer: Marie Pacella
  • Board members:  Stan and Susan Houseman, Carole Vranizan, Jan Fredrickson, Mark Kajitani, Virginia Vanture

News

Thank you to all who visited us at the December 2 Holiday Bazaar!  We sold all of the historic oatmeal cookie recipe jars.

Black Rock Coffee Shop: This new enterprise has made its appearance via a huge crane lifting the prefab pieces into place!  This drive-through and table service café is located adjacent to the Buy 2/Shell station on SW Garden Home Road. The exit from the Shell station onto SW Garden Home Rd has been modified to prevent turning left onto SW Garden Home Rd. Harry Pinniger tells us that this was the location of the Garden Home Water District office building before it merged into the Tualatin Valley Water District (Harry served on the Garden Home Water District board).

This Spring: We’re gathering the unique features of Garden Home that we’ll unfold for you in some manner, wonderful surprises! Stay posted for the details.

This fall we enjoyed a September presentation on Garden Home through the DecadesThis slide show of work by PCC student Spenser Kuroda features the building history of Garden Home since 1950. Tom Shreve presented this and reference material to an appreciative audience. Spenser’s report can be found on our Resources page.

Our October 9 program, Show and Tell from your family or a Garden Home treasure  brought out some interesting items. Cheryl Clark brought a selection of old bottles she retrieved from what seemed to be an old garbage dump near SW 92nd and Fanno Creek. Anyone else remember this garbage dump? Another find was a secreted old report card, reporting on student bad behavior, presumably hidden from parent eyes!

Other News

Remembering many of our other stories. These fun excerpts from our stories are just samples of the content you can discover browsing our almost 200 articles. We hope you are writing your story for your family.

Colin Lamb: The electricity was off in the Garden Home area for about a week after the Columbus Day storm in 1962. Of course, many homes had no heat so Dad left the presto logs out in the front of the store with a note to pay for them the next day.

Dan Nebert: Therefore, the church window at all times seemed to remain unlocked, so that we were always able to enjoy our rainy Saturday afternoon ping-pong games.

Plane crash: Lt Strong managed to guide the plane over the town of Metzger to what looked like a wooded area before bailing out and landing in some nearby trees unhurt.

Zora and Sharka Becvar: We sat for a little while and, since we did not understand what the teacher was saying, we just looked at each other, got up and left the room and went home.

Bob Feldman: you might have seen young Bob Feldman riding his bike home from Garden Home School precariously toting a pail of slop from the cafeteria to feed his new baby pigs. 

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had 5 thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. March 12 will be a special meeting for the public with refreshments and summaries by the Chair and the Treasurer. The plans for the year’s activities will be shared. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Get your Historic Garden Home t-shirt now for just $14 for small to XL. Larger XXL and XXXL sizes are $17. There is an additional charge of $9 to mail your shirt. They’re fun! Available at the Garden Home Market Place.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

Posted in Events, News | Tagged | Leave a comment

Bruce Koester

Bruce Koester was born in 1946, married Sandy in 1973 and has three children: Beth, Glen and Carl. Bruce has lived in his grandmother’s home near 62nd and Garden Home Road all of his life. The home was built in 1926 and his grandmother Augusta Matrix Hosner purchased the property in 1927 for $2,500 from Mr. Sabel who owned much of the property in that area. Bruce’s father, Otto Koester, came from Germany and married Augusta’s daughter, Elizabeth in 1928. Both parents died in 1979 and are buried at Crescent Grove Cemetery on Greenburg Road.

This home is in Multnomah County and City of Portland, so Bruce attended school at the Markham Annex building and then Benson High. His dad dropped him off at Benson on his way to work at Avondale Construction in east Portland.

The original garage for the Koester property was located east of the house, where the huge 1.75 million gallon Tualatin Valley Water District’s water tank now stands. This earthquake resistant tank was installed in 2013.

It replaced the two aging 500,000 gallon tanks which were developed in 1952. A row of about 20 very tall sequoia trees delineate the property line from the Koesters; the tiny saplings were planted about a yard apart in 1953. Mr. Sabel had an auto repair business at this location prior to the water tanks.

Neighbors in this general area included: Lily Vantile who was the mother to Jimmy Chevrolet. Eric Johansen who shot her cats after she died. Patsy Sheehan married Bob Jager who worked for Nabisco. Mrs. Clifford was reported to have come from Idaho in a wagon in 1900. This was necessary if the family was moving cattle or horses with them. Mr. Raz was a mechanic at C-Tran in Vancouver. The Raz family was from Switzerland. The Piper family sold their property to the Donners.

Like many homes of the neighborhood, this large lot of almost three quarters of an acre has provided a large garden, berry bushes, a cow, chickens, geese and other small animals. They had a cow until 1952 which his mother milked daily as was the German custom. In Switzerland, the custom was for the man of the house to do the milking. They had to circulate a petition in the neighborhood to get a permit to have a beehive which still produces nice honey.

Bruce’s father Otto Koester was a painter, using the lead based paints of the era. He is remembered to have suffered depressions and was quick to anger. After he retired, the family noted that his personality became much easier. After Bruce read The History of Poison, he believed that his dad had suffered the effects of lead poisoning from his daily contact with lead based paints for over 30 years.

Grocery shopping was generally at John’s Market or the Ben Franklin variety store in Multnomah. Bruce remembers when Throckmorten’s (also called the White store currently on Dairy Queen property in Garden Home) burned in April of 1956. The big wheel of cheese covered by the big glass dome was very inviting. The small store had wooden floors and shelves for the products. The Koester family used a freezer locker rented in the business located in the current Washington Square area at the SE corner of Hall and Scholls Ferry. The Blair family were noted because they were the only family with a freezer in their home. Other shopping was done by taking the bus downtown.

After Throckmorten’s store burned in 1956, a Standard service station went in which brought three service stations to this Garden Home intersection. The (Shari’s) NE corner had the Texaco station and the Mobil station was on the SW corner, home of the current Shell station.

The Columbus Day storm of 1962 left the area without electricity for about two weeks.

In the 1950s the kids played ball on Garden Home Road with only occasional traffic. Baseball was a very popular game. The family got a TV in 1956. They had a wood stove in the kitchen until 1949 and another in the living room.

The neighborhood women of the 1940s and 1950s generally didn’t work outside of the home. And often did not drive the family’s one car. Only three kids in this area were from single parent homes. Bruce’s mother was very active in developing St. Luke’s Lutheran Church at 45th and Garden Home Road, now closed. She also worked on making hooked and braided rugs out of discarded clothing and fabrics. They had a big garden. The Oldtimers club consisted of people from the neighborhood who met about once a month for a potluck.

Bruce’s mother, Elizabeth, usually called Betty, used and worked at Whitney’s Cannery in Garden Home in the 1950s. The Whitney’s would call her in when they had a big load of fruit or vegetables to get canned. The Cannery closed in 1976 when the Whitneys sold it to Frank Comella for a fruit and vegetable business.

Posted in Memoirs, People | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Robert Gertsch

Robert Gertsch was born in 1946. His grandfather and two brothers had settled in Garden Home in the 1890s and developed the early Shattuck Dairy. Robert started Garden Home School in the fourth grade in 1960 and graduated from Beaverton High in 1964. Robert is from the Fritz Gertsch side of the family.

The first Gertsch brothers, Peter, Christian and Fritz came over from Switzerland in the 1890s and Peter settled on the west side of Oleson Road north of Garden Home. Peter married Katy Tannler in 1894 and then unexpectedly died just six weeks after the birth of his first baby, whom they had named Pete to differentiate him from the father. Then according to Swiss custom, the next older boy, Christian, was sent for and he married Katy and they had two more sons, Albert and Christian in addition to Pete. This Pete married Rosalie Balmer and from this marriage, Shirley Gertsch Bartels was born. (See her story) Christian continued working with the Shattuck Dairy that Peter had started. It was located on the current Arranmore development including property north to Vermont Street. Fritz also worked with the Shattuck Dairy after he had earned enough money to purchase property on the east side of Oleson Road in the same area. Read more: Shirley Gertsch Bartels on Peter and Pete Gertsch.

The three brothers, Peter Gertsch 1867-1895, Christian Gertsch 1868-1949 and Fritz Gertsch Sr. 1881- 1954 are all buried at Greenwood Cemetery. Fritz Jr., Robert’s father, was born in 1910 and served in the Army in WWII. He died unexpectedly in ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­1988 as had his father, Fritz Sr. in 1954.

The third brother Fritz, usually called Fred here in America, came from Switzerland in 1898 and achieved citizenship in 1905. He worked very hard for a dairy east on Vermont, possibly the large Hoffman Balmer dairy. After working to develop some savings, Fritz purchased property across Oleson from Christian’s property and began working with Christian at the Shattuck Dairy. This Fritz, Sr. married Rosa Nuelerhoser, thought to be from Switzerland, and had a son Fritz, Jr. who married Olive Philena Wolfe.

Robert and Peter Albert Gertsch were born to Fritz Jr. and Olive Philena Wolfe. This Olive Philena Wolfe was born to Edna Oleson, a daughter of Ole Oleson who owned many acres in this area of Garden Home. Ole and his wife Polly Philena Patton had ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­eight children, one son and seven daughters. Robert remembers his father as a great story-teller, usually with himself as the central figure, embellishing the stories from time to time. Read more: Oleson families.

The Shattuck Dairy property remained in Pete Gertsch’s name. Many other dairies in the area included the Hunziker Dairy and Alpenrose Dairy. The Shattuck Dairy had regular routes for every other day deliveries. They stopped the home delivery service in 1950. After that, Fred Gertsch Jr. then worked for Darigold, going out on the route to pick up 10 gallon cans of milk. Some farmers had cream separators to fill 5 gallon cans. Most of the dairies ceased operation after “the Columbus Day storm” about 1962. Fritz Jr. continued work with the Wilhelm Trucking Company. Read more: Early Dairies by Pete Gertsch.

The Gertsch family members are buried in the Greenwood Cemetery in the South Burlingame area, off of Boones Ferry Road, near Palatine Hill Road. Most of the Oleson’s are buried at the Crescent Grove Cemetery on Greenburg Road, south of Garden Home. The Wolfe family members are buried at the Patton Cemetery, a small historic cemetery across Scholls Ferry Road from the Portland Golf Club.

Aunt Olive Oleson was a “no-nonsense” head nurse and along with her sister Lillian was a graduate of the Good Samaritan Hospital School of Nursing. They both served in WWI in Europe. Robert Gertsch served in the Army and his brother Peter Albert Gertsch served in the Air Force. Read more: Olive Philena Oleson and Lillian Oleson Harris Ruhl.

Robert had wanted to be a machinist and had training to be a welder. He also worked at an auto parts warehouse and as a welder building rail cars. Jobs were hard to get and he finally took the Post Office test. He worked 28 years at the main P.O. on Broadway, near the train station, retiring in 2011.

Grandfather Fritz Sr. had barrels in his basement where he made hard cider, wine and possibly other alcohol drinks during Prohibition. “He liked to have a little nip now and then.” Fritz St. was always able to get good quality whiskey during this period. Robert’s mother, Olive Philena, used to say “Bing Crosby music is not allowed” because Bing had been arrested for some alcohol possession and she thought he was a bad influence on children.

Robert got a lecture from Mr. Thurman, Garden Home School Principal, for fighting. The next year, in 6th grade, he splashed mud over a girl’s dress and had another talk with Mr. Thurman. He was to pay the girl’s family $10 to clean her dress but the family wasn’t concerned and simply washed the dress.

Other memories (please correct our spelling) in the Garden Home area include:

George Olus and Howard Lakanen, schoolmate of Olive Philena, ran the service station in Garden Home in the 1980s, located at the current station lot.

Lynch’s market in Hillsdale was used for grocery shopping.

Robert and friend Lyle Tate were scolded for bouncing a basketball in the ice cream parlor in Garden Mall. Irv Huppin had the pharmacy in that same mall beside the Lamb’s Thriftway.

The Benoits had three sons: Gordon, Stanley and Douglas. After an infraction on the basketball court, one of the boys pulled a pistol out of his jacket.

Harry Namitz did TV repair.

A big Swedish Model Home was a community attraction in the 1950s, located off of Peyton Road, off of Oleson.

Posted in Early History, Memoirs, People | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Nancy Donner

Nancy Donner, Nov 8 2017

Nancy and William (Bill) Donner moved to the Garden Home area in 1967 when Bill was transferred with the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers from Walla Walla, Washington. Their large home at SW 62nd and SW Garden Home Road accommodated their five children: Nancy, William, Larry, Madeline and Susan. The home is just inside the Multnomah County line so their children attended Smith Elementary, Jackson Middle School and Wilson High School. One of the early family cars was a two-door Studebaker and more children later, a green Chevy station wagon, no seatbelts or car seats in the 1960s and early 1970s.

The Donner home was a voting precinct in the early days, down in the basement. They also hosted the Corp of Engineers’ annual picnic in the summertime. With their one acre, they had a volley ball court for lots of fun.

Today, a grandson lives with Nancy. Nancy is a participant in Garden Home activities and attends church in Multnomah Village. Her neighbors included Bruce and his mother Betty Koester and formerly, Jewel Lansing and Don Sackett.

Early on in their marriage, Nancy and Bill were stationed in Alaska for about ten years with Bill in the Army Corp of Engineers. During that period, Nancy and a friend enjoyed sending in recipes to enter the Pillsbury Baking contests. Unlike today, the only rule at that time was to use at least one-half cup of Pillsbury flour. Nancy sent in recipes for her Greek shortbread with Ouzo liquor which keeps for a year! Also other recipes for Swedish meatballs and macaroni and cheese with eggs. Her friend won a prize for her cookies.

Nancy knew a lot of Germans who settled Garden Home. Her neighbors had large platted lots with chickens (and still today), a sheep and big gardens and fruit trees. The abundance was shared around the neighborhood. Sometimes, a neighbor would load up a wheel barrow with fruit, especially pears and vegetables and wheel it down the Garden Home Road hill to Whitney’s Cannery for preservation in cans.

The family did their grocery shopping at Mr. and Mrs. Lamb’s Thriftway. Nancy purchased her pots and pans at the hardware store that was associated with the store. If they went to a movie, they went into Portland to one of the downtown theaters. These theaters gave you a plate with each ticket purchased so that with regular attendance, you could build up a set of dishes. Service stations also had this promotion and gave away “depression glass,” a clear colored glass popular in the 1940s and 1950s. Lamb’s Thriftway also enticed you with specially priced china or glass dishes.

For many years, the Donner family welcomed Portland State’s foreign students to come to their home to share in the holidays. As the Donner children grew up and left the bedrooms, she took in foreign students for about 30 years. She now enjoys the many contacts from these students. Nancy speaks French and an older dialect of Italian, the language of her family home.

Nancy fondly recalls the Sunday afternoon activity to go for a ride and visit the relatives, all unannounced ahead of time. Social times were spent playing Canasta, Scrabble or checkers. Doors were not locked and fences did not appear until the 1970s or so.

Social activities with women friends involved going downtown to the Meier & Frank store, sometimes to try on hats. The restroom use required that you pay a small fee to the attendant to unlock the toilet door. You could also summon your youngster to crawl under the door and unlock it to evade the charge. As a special treat, her mother-in-law would take her to lunch or tea in Meier & Frank’s Georgian Room, the ultimate in luxury in Portland. In those days, women dressed up to go downtown never wearing casual pants. The Hilton Hotel might allow a matching pantsuit but never the pants of today.

The Donner family continues to be part of Garden Home along with ties to the Multnomah area and Portland schools. Things are different now, it’s hard to cook for a big group because you have to plan for vegans or people with nut allergies or other special needs.

Posted in Memoirs, People | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Kenneth Thomas Mistler obituary

Kenneth Thomas Mistler, July 29, 1940 to December 27, 2017

Kenneth Thomas Mistler

Kenneth Thomas Mistler passed away Wednesday, Dec. 27, 2017, at St. Vincent’s hospital from complications after heart surgery. He was surrounded by his wife, his daughter and his two sisters.

Ken was born at the original location of that same hospital July 29, 1940, to Marie Cecelia Rasmussen, daughter of Danish immigrant Andy Rasmussen, and his wife, Birdie. He would be followed by sisters, Cindy and Eilleen and brothers, Walter, Terry and Ted, in that order. Kenneth’s father for most of his life was his mother’s second husband, Phillip J. Mistler.

Ken and his brothers and sisters grew up in the Garden Home and Metzger areas, attending Garden Home Grade School and Beaverton High School. For much of high school, he worked at the Chevron service station owned by his uncles, Paul and Wilbur Rasmussen, which still stands at the intersection of Hwy. 99 and 217.

He was the first person in his family to attend college, putting himself through Portland State University as the nighttime manager of the downtown YMCA. It was while working at the YMCA that he met his first wife, the nighttime switchboard operator and a fellow student at PSU, Kathy Simer, with whom he had one child, a daughter named Mickey, born in 1967.

After PSU, they worked hard to put him through Lewis & Clark Law School, where he was one of the founding editors of the first environmental law review in the country. He would sometimes show people the letter he received from President Nixon commending him on this achievement.

Kenneth received a special dispensation from the Oregon State Bar to start working as a Deputy District Attorney for Washington County before he’d actually had a chance to take the bar exam, which he said really put the pressure on to pass it (which he did).

Prosecuting criminals was rewarding, but emotionally grueling work. He often described his job as mostly prosecuting men for hurting their wives, girlfriends and children. Eventually, he decided to quit the law and went into real estate, founding his own real estate brokerage, Oregon First, which he grew to one of the largest in the state.

It was at Oregon First that Kenneth met and married his second wife, Mary Louise Monahan, over 27 years ago. With her, he shares four more children, 12 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren, all of whom he loved very much.

Kenneth was buried in a private ceremony at the same cemetery as both his sets of grandparents. He will be greatly missed for his sense of humor; his desire to learn from others and to share his knowledge with them; his commitment to doing the right thing, even when it’s difficult; and most of all, his kindness.

Posted in News, Obituaries, People | Tagged | 2 Comments

Ernilie Storrs obituary

Gladys Ernilie Burgess Storrs July 17, 1924 to April 16, 2017

Gladys Enilie Burgess Storrs July 17, 1924 to April 16, 2017

Gladys Ernilie Burgess Storrs was born on July 17, 1924 in Tacoma, WA. She never used her first name; 5 minutes after she came home to Puyallup, her three big brothers decided her name was Ernie. And it stuck.

Ernie worked in Seattle at Boeing Field during WWII and met her husband James Storrs while traveling from Puyallup to Seattle on the bus. They dated until he was shipped to the South Pacific and married soon after his return. They settled in Newberg, Oregon until about 1958 when they moved to Garden Home.

Ernie was very active with Home Extension as well as a quilting group that met at the local church. She just recently was presented with her 59 year pin for Extension. Quite an honor. She made a number of quilts for the new babies  of friends and other lucky folks, and also finished several quilts that had been pieced by her mother and grandmother.

She was an active member of the Hillsdale Community Church, United Church of Christ and took great enjoyment in attending various functions there.

She passed away suddenly and unexpectedly in the early hours of Easter Sunday leaving behind her daughter Lori Snyder (Kevan), and son Brian Storrs.

A Celebration of Life was held at the church. She is interred at Willamette Cemetery with her beloved Jim. Donations in Remembrance could be made to the American Cancer Society or the Al Kader Shriners Ladder of Smiles.

Posted in News, Obituaries, People | Tagged , | Leave a comment

January 2018 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

Feb. 12, Monday, 6:30 pm:  Virginia Vanture will be presenting a thirty minute slide show on the old Cannery.  The Old Market Brew Pub now occupies the building at the confluence of Multnomah Blvd. and Garden Home Road.

March 12, Monday, 6:30:  Annual meeting, election of officers. Currently:

  • Chair: Patsy VandeVenter
  • Vice-chair:  Elaine Shreve
  • Secretary, Treasurer: Marie Pacella
  • Board members:  Stan and Susan Houseman, Carole Vranizan, Jan Fredrickson, Mark Kajitani, Virginia Vanture

News

Dorothy Johnson Stevens and Pat Boone – 2017

Our Holiday greetings to all of our Garden Home friends and families.  Thank you for sharing your stories and photos.  Thank you for your interest, your attendance at our many events and your donations to sustain our historical research and community education.  Thank you to our Board of Directors for their diligent efforts to present our history.

This greeting from Dorothy Johnson Stevens reminds us of a young Garden Home girl who became Miss Oregon in 1955.  Her dad had the service station and she lived next door. She went on to become the first runner-up for Miss America and then on to Hollywood!  She starred in Bernadine along with Pat Boone, and still a beauty!

Thank you to all who visited us at the December 2 Holiday Bazaar!  We sold all of the historic oatmeal cookie recipe jars.

Black Rock Coffee Shop: This new enterprise has made its appearance via a huge crane lifting the prefab pieces into place!  This drive-through and table service café is located adjacent to the Buy 2/Shell station on SW Garden Home Road. The exit from the Shell station onto SW Garden Home Rd has been modified to prevent turning left onto SW Garden Home Rd. Harry Pinniger tells us that this was the location of the Garden Home Water District office building before it merged into the Tualatin Valley Water District (Harry served on the Garden Home Water District board).

This Spring: We’re gathering the unique features of Garden Home that we’ll unfold for you in some manner, wonderful surprises! Stay posted for the details.

This fall we enjoyed a September presentation on Garden Home through the DecadesThis slide show of work by PCC student Spenser Kuroda features the building history of Garden Home since 1950. Tom Shreve presented this and reference material to an appreciative audience. Spenser’s report can be found on our Resources page.

Our October 9 program, Show and Tell from your family or a Garden Home treasure  brought out some interesting items. Cheryl Clark brought a selection of old bottles she retrieved from what seemed to be an old garbage dump near SW 92nd and Fanno Creek. Anyone else remember this garbage dump? Another find was a secreted old report card, reporting on student bad behavior, presumably hidden from parent eyes!

Other News

Remembering many of our other stories. These fun excerpts from our stories are just samples of the content you can discover browsing our almost 200 articles. We hope you are writing your story for your family.

Colin Lamb: The electricity was off in the Garden Home area for about a week after the Columbus Day storm in 1962. Of course, many homes had no heat so Dad left the presto logs out in the front of the store with a note to pay for them the next day.

Dan Nebert: Therefore, the church window at all times seemed to remain unlocked, so that we were always able to enjoy our rainy Saturday afternoon ping-pong games.

Plane crash: Lt Strong managed to guide the plane over the town of Metzger to what looked like a wooded area before bailing out and landing in some nearby trees unhurt.

Zora and Sharka Becvar: We sat for a little while and, since we did not understand what the teacher was saying, we just looked at each other, got up and left the room and went home.

Bob Feldman: you might have seen young Bob Feldman riding his bike home from Garden Home School precariously toting a pail of slop from the cafeteria to feed his new baby pigs. 

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had 5 thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. March 12 will be a special meeting for the public with refreshments and summaries by the Chair and the Treasurer. The plans for the year’s activities will be shared. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Get your Historic Garden Home t-shirt now for just $14 for small to XL. Larger XXL and XXXL sizes are $17. There is an additional charge of $9 to mail your shirt. They’re fun! Available at the Garden Home Market Place.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

Posted in News | Tagged | Leave a comment

Mary Helen Himes Koeber

1932 Mary Helen Himes, Lincoln High School graduation. Courtesy Mary Helen Himes Koeber. See post.

1932 Mary Helen Himes, Lincoln High School graduation.
Courtesy Mary Helen Himes Koeber. See post.

Mary Helen Himes Koeber (1913-2017)

[Update: Mary Helen passed away on May 7, 2017. She was a beautician and opened the first beauty shop in Beaverton. She attended Garden Home and Hillsboro grade schools, graduating from Lincoln High School in Portland. Her grandfather was George Himes, one of the original curators of the Oregon Historical Society.

She is survived by her sister Grace (Himes) McInnis and her sons Ivan, George and Robert Koeber. Also numerous grandchildren, great grandchildren, nephews and nieces. A memorial was held in Himes Park on Terwilliger Boulevard.]

Centenarian Mary Helen Himes (born Sept. 28, 1913) and her mother Vera L. Prince Himes (died 1988) and father Claridge Holcomb Himes (died in accident 1927) moved to Garden Home for two years in about 1919 to 1921. She lived on Royal Avenue (71st now) along with her siblings George Richard, Claridge Holcomb, and Grace Emma on an acre plot. She attended first and second grade at Garden Home School. Her teacher was Mary Lehman. A neighbor Evelyn Simpkins Biles lived across the street.

Her father, Claridge H. Himes took the Oregon Electric into Portland to work at the Fleischner-Mayer, a dry goods store in today’s Old Town. This store was built in 1906 and stands today at 115 NW First Avenue, Portland. He later worked at the Meier & Frank (now Macy’s) retail store. Her mother, Vera Prince Himes, raised the children and taught piano.

Hairdresser: In 1923, the Himes family moved to Hillsboro. They were lucky to have one car during the Depression. “Dad would take the car to work and everyone else walked everywhere.”  Mary Helen graduated from Lincoln High School. In those days when you graduated from high school, if you weren’t going to college, you went to California. Two of her siblings went there and she spent a few years in San Francisco and liked the city.

After graduation, Mary Helen went to Sanitary Beauty School for six months and $50 and then passed the State Board examination to be a hairdresser. She had a salon in her home after she was married and came to know lots of the early residents in the area.

Pioneer families: Although Mary Helen will be 100 on Sept. 28, 2013 she lives independently in Beaverton. She appreciates the help that her sons George, Robert, and Ivan Ted Koeber provide. Mary Helen’s family and relatives were important early pioneers of the area and are illustrative of the contributions of our early families.

Tyrus and Emeline Himes were  Mary Helen’s paternal great grandparents. George H. Himes, her grandfather, has the middle name of Holcomb, the maiden name of his mother Emeline Holcomb Himes, from the very early and distinguished Holcomb family, pilgrim settlers of 1635.  George’s parents  Tyrus, b. 1818,d. 1879, and Emeline Himes, b. 1821, began their journey west in 1853 with their four children and horse and ox teams. They experienced many hardships including loss of stock and limited provisions. Their wagon train of thirty-six wagons and seventy-five people crossed the Natchez Pass (Nevada) over an undeveloped trail and finally arrived in Olympia, Washington in 1853.

George Holcomb Himes: Mary Helen’s paternal grandfather George H. Himes as a young man worked in rail making, wood cutting and other labors in clearing land on his parent’s donation land claim east of Olympia. Although he had limited education, he aspired to learn the printing trade and began at the Washington Standard, a paper published in Olympia. After his apprenticeship, he moved down to The Oregonian in Portland and in 1870 began his own business “Himes, the Printer.” In 1898 George was a founding member of the Oregon Historical Society and the first and long-time curator.

George Holcomb Himes, b. 5-18-1844, d. 1940, married Anna F. Riggs, d. 1933, from Eola, a small community west of Salem, and raised 5 daughters and one son Claridge H. Himes. Anna’s family came to Portland in 1859 by steamer from New York and settled on a ranch in Eola, west of Salem, Polk County. A family notation says “Grandpa met Anna at the ranch while stopping for dinner in 1865.  He was 23 when married and she was 17 or 18.” George and Anna had 11 children, eight of which survived: Edna Emeline, Sarah Myrtle, Mary, Grace Helen, Claridge Holcomb (father of Mary Helen), Mildred Florence, Fay Celestial and Lurah Margaret.

OHS Curator: George H. Himes is honored as one of the founding members of the Oregon Historical Society and was the first curator, a position he held for over 54 years. A Portland city park along SW Terwilliger Boulevard bears his name as did the Liberty ship George H. Himes. In 1943 the ship was built in the Oregon shipyards for World War II in the amazing time of 28 days.  It was torpedoed in Guadalcanal and finally scrapped in 1964.  His extensive documents, papers and diaries are archived at the Oregon Historical Society. “A dedicated diarist, he kept a daily record of his life, beginning at the age of fourteen and continuing until his death at ninety-five.” 1

Slavin family: Mary Helen’s father Claridge Holcomb Himes, 7-7-1881 to 1927 married her mother, Vera Prince, who died in 1988. Vera’s father is Richard C. Prince, pictured.   Vera’s mother, Mary Slavin Prince, was from the early pioneer family of John A. Slavin. John Slavin started for California in 1850 but ended up buying his way down the Columbia in a small boat provided he would pull one oar. 2  John married Emma Ross in 1852.

They took a donation land claim at the corner of Clackamas, Washington and Multnomah counties. He built a cabin and large barn off of Slavin Road at what is now Capitol Highway and Sunset Boulevard, approximately in the location of the Hillsdale Library. Slavin Road was a major early road leading into Portland and a portion of it was changed to Capitol Highway.  Slavin Road continues in a multiple housing area just east of Barbur Boulevard near Hamilton.

In 1884 John and Emma Slavin enlarged the little house in the woods, building a good farm house. They had six children including Mary Slavin Prince, Mary Helen’s maternal grandmother.

John A. Slavin barn on Slavin Road. Courtesy Mary Helen Himes Koeber. See post.

John A. Slavin barn on Slavin Road.
Courtesy Mary Helen Himes Koeber. See post.

1884 residence of John and Emma Ruth Ross Slavin, Hillsdale. Courtesy Mary Helen Himes Koeber. See post.

1884 residence of John and Emma Ruth Ross Slavin, Hillsdale.
Courtesy Mary Helen Himes Koeber. See post.

Resources:

  • Photos from family
  • 1.  http://www.oregonencyclopedia.org/George Himes, written by Geoffrey Wexler
  • 2.  Illustrated History of Oregon/John A. Slavin
  • genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/infleischner
  • Rev.H.K. Hines. Illustrated History of the State of Oregon, 1893.  Lewis Publishing Company.
  • http://www.slavens.net/bios/john_a_slavin.htm
  • Portland Parks, George Himes Park Trail System
  • Thanks to Julie Bishop (Amy Northrop’s mom) Raz connection, to confirm location of Slavin barn, house.
  • Thanks to Katherine McDonald for October interview with Mrs. Koeber

By Elaine Shreve, 2013

Posted in Early History, Memoirs, Obituaries, People | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Patricia Joanne James Gossett obituary

Patricia Joanne James Gossett, August 6, 1931 to August 27, 2012

Pattijo was born at Emanuel Hospital to Leonard and Mary Huffsmith. She attended Ockley Green Grade School, Jefferson High and Lewis and Clark College, receiving her nursing degree at Emanuel Hospital. She is survived by her husband, Lane; her son and daughter-in-law, Kevin and Karin James of Seattle; daughter, Leslie Younger; grandson, Jacob Younger; great-grandchildren, Trinity and Tristan Gossett; and her loving extended family. She was predeceased by her brother, Jim Huffsmith. Pattijo’s career at Emanuel Hospital spanned 32 years. She then taught for five years at the College of Legal Arts. She was a member of the Emanuel Hospital School of Nursing Alumni Association, the Association of Volunteer Registered Nurses and was a regular attendee at the Good Friends Club luncheon. In retirement, she did what she’d always done – looked out for people, volunteering at Emanuel and Ronald McDonald House. She was a lover of life, keeper of the faith, follower of the rainbow, believer in good, guardian of those in need and a friend to all. Pattijo was one of a kind. A service will be held at Lewis and Clark College in the Agnes Flanagan Chapel on Sunday, Sept. 16, 2012 at 2 p.m. with a reception following. In lieu of flowers, please honor Pattijo with a contribution to Ronald McDonald House.

Posted in News, Obituaries, People | Tagged | Leave a comment

Delores Jarvis obituary

Delores Jarvis, January 11, 1930 to November 4, 2017

Delores Jarvis (1930-2017)

Delores was born Jan. 11, 1930, the first child of George and Dora Olson of Warren, Ore. She died of complications from Parkinson’s disease Nov. 4, 2017 at her home of 58 years in Garden Home with family and friends at her side.

Delores was a gifted vocalist who sang with a trio in a swing band at events in the Portland/Vancouver areas. She was also quite the beauty, representing Columbia County in the Miss Oregon Pageant.

John Jarvis “Jack” and Delores were married in 1954. Five years later they purchased their property in Garden Home where they would raise their four children.

In the early ’60s Delores was invited by a childhood friend to a new church they were starting. She attended the first service of West Hills Covenant which was held in the parsonage.

On Jan. 4, 1971 Jack died of Melanoma leaving her with their four children ranging in age from five to 11. She leaned into her relationship with God along with her vibrant church community to sustain herself and her kids.

Following Jack’s death Delores began working full-time for Beaverton Schools cafeteria services. She did this until she retired in 1992.

Delores’ home was open to all and created a safe haven of encouragement for many to grow in. Her children were raised with community surrounding them because of the rich relationships that Delores cultivated.

Delores was prayerful, intentional, decisive, wise and humble. She loved her life and those she shared it with. She was a friend to everyone that she met and was consistently present in every moment.

She leaves a legacy of joy that was uncontainable. It permeated everything she did.
Delores is survived by her sister, Lois (Gaylon) Bledsoe; children, Andrea Jarvis, Lisa (Mike) Leslie, David (Jill) Jarvis, Dana (Steve) Nasralla; 10 grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; Wayne and Ruth Smith, and many other friends.

A memorial celebration will be held at 2 p.m., Dec. 2, 2017, at West Hills Covenant Church 5815 S.W. Gillcrest Ct., Portland, OR 97221

Donations to the West Hills Covenant church deacon fund are welcome.

This obituary appeared in The Oregonian, November 2017 (source). Used with permission from Jarvis family.

Posted in News, Obituaries, People | Tagged | Leave a comment