August 2017 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find over a hundred stories and over a thousand photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

Garden Home structures by decade of appearance.

Monday, September 11, 6:30 PM: 30-minute slide presentation on maps by PCC students about Garden Home buildings by decade. All are invited to the Board meeting following at 7:00 PM.

Monday, October 9, 6:30 PM: 30-minute slide presentation, topic TBA. All are invited to the Board meeting following at 7:00 PM.

Sunday, November 12, 1 to 3:00 PM: Veterans Celebration honoring attending veterans and Color Guard presentation.

Saturday, December 2: Come visit our table at the annual holiday bazaar at the Garden Home Recreation Center.

Sunday, December 10, 3 to 7 PM: Holiday party. Details to be announced.

News

We held an Ice Cream Social on Sunday, July 30, 2017. We had a wonderful time outside on the playground, under the new overhead cover, meeting our neighbors and friends and enjoying free ice cream cones. We had almost 150 people attend to chat with one another and peruse the historic displays and albums of Garden Home School children. The school closed in 1982, 35 years ago, the balloons on our poster being released that day. Thanks to chairpersons Patsy VandeVenter and Carole Vranizan who were assisted by members of the Garden Home History Project Board.

We enjoyed our May 21 tour of early Garden Home pioneer graves at the Crescent Grove Cemetery. A beautiful day, four guides reviewed the histories of over two dozen of our brave pioneers, most of whom came out on the Oregon trail. Thanks to all our volunteers and tour attendees!

Facebook:  Ginny Mapes has created a facebook group about Garden Home History.  She edited the student project, Garden Home – the way it was which was published in 1980 by the Beaverton School District.  Ms. Mapes was the librarian at Garden Home School and then moved on to Greenway School where she and Jill MacWilliam authored another book, Traces of the Past, about the history of that area and included more stories on Garden Home.  Both of these books are available for in-library use at the Garden Home Community Library and they both can be checked out through any Washington County Library (with your library card).

facebook.com/Garden-Home-the-way-it-was-881298175303220

Other News

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had 5 thirty-minute slide presentations last year from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. March 13 will be a special meeting for the public with refreshments and summaries by the Chair and the Treasurer. The plans for the year’s activities will be shared. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Our 2016 activities included seven slideshow and speaker presentations:

  • February, Tom Shreve presented 1950’s aerial photos of Garden Home
  • March, Pat Dignan presented early photos and family life in the Hunt Club area.
  • April, Virginia Vanture presented on the Century Homes
  • May, Colin Lamb presented on history of early Thriftway, shopping center.
  • June, Elaine Shreve slideshow Garden Components and review of History & Garden Tour
  • October, Tom Shreve presented 1903 story of Murder on ‘the Garden Home Road’
  • November, Tom Shreve presented his favorite photos of Garden Home area.

2016 Events:

  • June 4, the History and Garden Tour, done with the Garden Home Gardeners.
  • August 13, outdoor Reunion of Garden Home School and Beaverton High students
  • Nov. 5, Bell Ringing at Garden Home Market, old church bell
  • Dec. 3, Participation in Bazaar, sell handmade ornaments, bookmarks
  • Dec. 12, Party at Shreve home.

Board of Directors, Garden Home History Project, 2016:

Chair: Elaine Shreve
Vice-Chair: Janice Logan
Secretary: Patsy VandeVenter
Treasurer: Marie Pacella

Board Members: (voting) John Pacella, Stan and Susan Houseman, Sasha Kaplan, Carole Vranizan, Louise Cook Jones, Bob and Delia Day, Mark Kajitani (Served for partial term:  Christina Mauroni, Ginny McCarthy)

Advisory Board:  Serving the project with special skills, services or resources: Bob & Sharon Cram, Tom Shreve, Virginia Vanture, Jan Fredrickson

2017 presentations and events will be planned at February 13 meeting.

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Get your Historic Garden Home t-shirt now for just $14 for small to XL. Larger XXL and XXXL sizes are $17. There is an additional charge of $9 to mail your shirt. They’re fun! Available at the Garden Home Market Place.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

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Steve Mapes obituary

Steve Mapes, February 18, 1942 to July 19, 2017

Steve Mapes, February 18, 1942 to July 19, 2017

Steve grew up in Garden Home and Tigard where he graduated from high school in 1960.  After studying at the University of Oregon and Portland State, he married Esta Anderson in 1965.  They moved back to Garden Home where they raised their two children, Kevin and Kelli.  Steve worked as a supervisor for the Portland Water Bureau, where he retired in 1998.

Steve was an avid runner, completing several marathons, cheering on the Ducks and Trail Blazers and supporting his children in their activities.  Steve and Esta traveled the world and loved returning to their beach house at Road’s End.  Steve was a wonderful community member and could always be counted on for Garden Home activities.  Memorials to Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

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Lucille E. Adams obituary

Lucille E. Adams, January 20, 1925 to August 10, 2017

Lucille E. Adams Jan 20, 1925 to Aug 10, 2017

Lucille was the wife of Culmer “John” Adams and shared in his history.  John’s grandparents lived on the north side of SW Garden Home Road just east of the Thriftway store property in the 1930s and ‘40s.

She attended Jefferson High School.  Early in their marriage they lost everything in the Vanport flood but moved on to raise their family in the Beaverton area.  She was preceded in death by her husband and siblings and survived by her children Susan, Cathleen,  and Jeffrey and their families.

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July 30, 2017 Ice Cream Social

Ice Cream Social, July 30, 2017 from 1:pm to 3:pm on a Sunday afternoon:  We had a wonderful time outside on the playground, under the new overhead cover, meeting our neighbors and friends and enjoying free ice cream cones. We had almost 150 people attend to chat with one another and peruse the historic displays and albums of Garden Home School children. The school closed in 1982, 35 years ago, the balloons on our poster being released that day. Thanks to chairpersons Patsy VandeVenter and Carole Vranizan who were assisted by members of the Garden Home History Project Board.

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May 21, 2017 Crescent Grove Cemetery Tour

We enjoyed our May 21 tour of early Garden Home pioneer graves at the Crescent Grove Cemetery. A beautiful day, four guides reviewed the histories of over two dozen of our brave pioneers, most of whom came out on the Oregon trail. Our tour guides were Mark Kajatani, Janice Logan, Susan Houseman, and Elaine Shreve. Judy and Dan Donovan appeared in pioneer costume and spoke about the Denny family.

Thanks to all our volunteers and tour attendees!

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History of the Alpenrose Dairy

Alpenrose Dairy (year unkown)

Alpenrose Dairy (year unkown)

Alpenrose is the oldest family-owned dairy in Oregon. It was named after a flower in Switzerland, where McKinnon’s family lived before moving to Oregon over 100 years ago.

Located off Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway at 6149 S.W. Shattuck Road, the dairy has long offered many facilities and activities more closely associated with public parks, including the most steeply banked bicycle Velodrome track in the region, a quarter-mile oval track for go-kart racing, and baseball fields where Little League World Series girl’s games have been played for the past 23 years.

Tracey Cadonau McKinnon’s grandfather, Carl Cadonau Sr., started Dairyville in the 1950s to provide wholesome recreation for families after church. The buildings, which increased in number over the years, look like a cowboy movie set. Original activities included pony rides, kite-racing, and frog-jumping, pie-eating and cow-milking contests. Visitors also enjoyed the challenge of climbing a pole covered with bacon fat, where those who made it to the top could earn a silver dollar.

Alpenrose Dairy’s roots run deep in the community. Back when most of Southwest Portland was farmland, Florian Cadonau began to deliver milk to downtown Portland in 1891 with his young son, Henry, who opened the dairy in 1916 with his wife, Rosina.

Originally located at Southwest 45th Avenue and Vermont Street, it moved to its current location after a catastophic fire. Henry’s son, Carl Sr., joined the business after returning from World War II in 1946, and his son, Carl Cadonau Jr., later joined him. The senior Cadonau ran the dairy until his death in 2004. The dairy currently is managed by Cadonau Jr. and Rod Birkland, both great-grandsons of Florian Cadonau.

The dairy did not set out to become a community center. According to Carl Jr., when he and Rod were growing up, they and their brothers would play ball near their grandmother’s rose garden. After trampling some of the plants, she told Henry to build the kids their own ball field. A local Little League saw it and soon was playing games there. Dugouts, lights and a scoreboard were added over the next few years. After a couple more fields popped up, the dairy gained a reputation for having excellent facilities, eventually hosting the Little League Softball World Series games that are broadcast every year on ESPN.

More sports facilities followed, including the Quarter Mile midget track (go-karts) in the 1950s, a dirt-surfaced bicycle track in 1962, and the Velodrome in 1967. The facility began hosting national competitions just two years later.

At one point, the dairy also had between 80 and 100 Shetland ponies that would be taken to grocery stores for pony rings and wagon rides. McKinnon says rides also were offered at the dairy in the first building of what became Dairyville.

Today, the dairy is a different business than it once was. In the past, as many as 250 cows were on the property. Early deliveries were made around the city by horse and wagon. Now, Alpenrose gets its milk from a co-op that includes approximately 100 farms in the state. Processing is done at a modern plant at the dairy, from which products are then distributed.

But, despite the changes, Alpenrose still gives back to the community by opening its doors to visitors and staging such signature events as one of the largest Easter egg hunts in the country.  It is opened every Sunday afternoon during the 2017 summer. Free.

Adapted by Elaine Shreve from the Portland Tribune story of June 2, 2017, written by Jim Redden.  This story used with author permission 6-2-17. Visit http://cni.pmgnews.com/pt/361371  for the full original story and photos (Pamplin Media Group).

[Editor: After we published the above story, Doc Hickman called with more details, below.]

Doc Hickman: Remembering Alpenrose and early life in Garden Home.

After a fire at the Elco Dairy on Shattuck Road, Alpenrose purchased the Elco acres and moved from its original location at SW 45th and Vermont.

Stan Marugg was hit by a car up at Alpenrose, broke his arm, successfully sued the dairy.

Doc worked in hauling a thousand tons of alfalfa baled hay from a farm at Goldendale, WA.  It was used to feed the large herd of milk cows at the dairy.

Pete Gertsch farmed with horses in the early part of the 1900’s.  After WW II, he bought a small tractor.  Alfalfa was the major feed for cows, besides pastures.  It could be cut and stacked 2-4 times in a year.

Doc also worked for the Schallberger’s dairy farm on Scholls Ferry Road near the Raleigh Hills intersection. The testing of milk was a complicated and expensive procedure in that day. The untested and thoroughly clean milk had to be sold as “dog milk.” On this farm, they rigged up a system of dog milk in big cans where one could drain the amount of milk they needed into a container and then choose to use it for dogs or to drink for the family. People paid by an honor system.

From our Doc Hickman story:

In 1948 at the time of the great Vanport flood in north Portland, Mrs. Schallberger had gone to Switzerland to visit family. One of the family members had taken a nice photo of the dairy farm to send her but then forgot to turn the dial to move the photo on to the next space on the camera. Another picture of the terrible Vanport flood got overlaid on top of the Schallberger farm to present an alarming photo. They were afraid to send this photo to Switzerland fearing that it would be misinterpreted.  Addition:  When Mrs. Schallberger came home, she brought one of the large famous Swiss cowbells especially inscribed for the Alpenrose Dairy.

For more information about the history of the Alpenrose Dairy, visit:

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Photos from the Washington County Museum

We recently acquired a trove of historical photos of Garden Home courtesy of the Washington County Museum. We’re still working on stories for some of these photos, but we’re too exicited about them to not share them immediately.

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T. E. Hills (U.S. Civil War veteran)

Chas. Jocobs, Emily E. Hills, E. E. Beebe, Alice A. Beebe, T. E. Hills, Oct 5, 1922 in Garden Home

(L to R) Chas. Jocobs, Emily E. Hills, E. E. Beebe, Alice A. Beebe, T. E. Hills, Oct 5, 1922 in Garden Home

The name of Mr. T.E. Hills comes up in various accounts of early Garden Home. He lived in the older two-story blue house (Dickson home) on Oleson Road at Shirley Lane, 7730 SW Oleson Road, back in the early 1900s. His obituary says he lived in Garden Home from 1908 to 1941. At age 23 he married Emily Beebe in Illinois, who later taught at Garden Home School and then after Emily’s death, at age 80 he married her sister Alice who had lived with them. In 1909, T.E., Emily and Alice were listed as owners of 8 acres in Garden Home. T.E. died on Jan. 4, 1941 at age 96. (Mapes research and Mapes, Virginia: Garden Home – The Way It Was, 1980)

The book Conversations with Pioneer Men by Fred Lockley and compiled by Mike Helm identifies the T.E. Hills name to be Theophilus E. Hills. That book, published in 1996, contained extensive early interviews by Lockley. Theophilus is quoted in the book: “I was 17 when I enlisted in Company 1, 34th Illinois, as a drummer. We were with the 2nd Division of the 14th Corps and I went with Sherman to the sea. I enlisted in August, 1861, for three years, and reenlisted at the end of that period. Shiloh was our first battle. Most of the members of our company were young chaps—from 17 to about 21 years of age.”

T.E. Hills recounts his time in the Union army and the Battle of Stone River where he was eventually captured and later able to flee into a plum thicket and get back to his Union company. As a prisoner, he was ordered to take care of the wounded. After another battle as a Union soldier, he surveyed the battleground and found “his bunkie” badly injured. He carried this man to the ambulance and he lived to fight again.

Dorothy Upchurch (parents owned the White store, 1930s and 40s, current DQ property) writes in her memoirs:

“On the other side of our property was the T.E. Hills Victorian farmhouse. An orchard of filberts separated our places. We were fascinated by “Old Man Hills” as my father called him. He was a Civil War veteran, had a flagpole with brass cannon on the top and ran the flag up and down every day. I can still see him in the Memorial Day parade in his navy blue Union uniform with brass buttons, a campaign hat with a gold cord on his head. He also drove a spit and polished 1909 Ford. Quite a curiosity in the 20s when he drove it to Portland, it drew quite a crowd with its polished brass headlights and struts to the windshield from the fenders. It was in such a beautiful condition that Henry Ford offered to buy it and to put it in his Dearborn Museum and trade a new Mercury for it. Mr. Hill agreed, received the new car, drove it for a time and then demanded his old Ford back, and got it.”

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May 2017 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find over a hundred stories and over a thousand photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

May 8, 6:30 – 7:00 pm, Garden Home Recreation Center, 7475 SW Oleson Road, free: Thirty-minute slide show presentation about two historic local cemeteries, Crescent Grove Cemetery and the Scholls Ferry Cemetery and some of our notable early pioneers of the area. Learn about Dr. Henry Roe Cloud, once called the “most important living Indian” and his “Mother of the Year” wife. See how cemeteries continue to tell the stories of our families and our histories. Join us to learn about your community!

May 21, 2-3:30 pm, Crescent Grove Cemetery, 9925 SW Greenburg Road (next to Washington Square): Join us for a Sunday afternoon tour of graves of local pioneers and notable names in our early history.  Tigard, Greenburg, Fanno, Denney, and Oleson are just a few of the names. Wear comfortable shoes, bring an umbrella if indicated. Donation of $5 appreciated. You’ll hear wonderful stories of our early history.  Park down by the mausoleum at this beautiful historic Crescent Grove Cemetery.

News

The historic Partlow-Kickbush home on SW 78th Avenue has been demolished to make way for new construction. We don’t have details yet on the new construction.

Thanks to Stan Houseman for an excellent presentation on the history of Rummer homes at our last history project meeting.

Thanks to Washington County Museum for their March display of Garden Home photos and memoribilia. They continue to feature other communities each month. Go visit them in Hillsboro.

New stories on the website

We have a new memoir by Don Krom recounting his experiences living in Garden Home since the 1940s and his recollections of the people and places of Garden Home past.

We have a new story about Dorothy McNamara Bastien and her writing group in Garden Home in the 1940s.

We have a new story about T. E. Hills, a veteran of the US Civil War that lived in Garden Home. T. E. Hills lived in Garden Home from 1908 until his death at age 96 in 1941.

Slightly older stories on the website


We updated the the story about Leona Whitney to include new details about her popular chalkboard messages at the road by the Whitney’s Cannery, now the Old Market Pub.  We also updated the story about the Garden Home Cooperative Cannery to describe how it was first built over in the Progress shopping center and then built in Garden Home for its first birthday. Besides memberships, one of the co-op’s first fund raising events was a school carnival.

Warren Cook contributed an article about the Blue Bus service, owned by the Tualatin Valley Bus Company, that served the Garden Home area prior to acquisition by TriMet in 1970.

1903 Halloween Murder on the Garden Home Road! We previously posted a story about the other Garden Home road discussing how the moniker of Garden Home road used to refer to the route of SW Broadway Drive to SW Patton Road to SW Shattuck Road to SW Oleson Road. We discovered this fact when we stumbled across a story about the 1903 Halloween fatal shooting of Adolph Burkhardt on “the Garden Home road” by Samuel Bauman. This new story is the follow-up describing the details of slaying, the feud between two farmers that precipitated the killing, the mystery about where Adolph Burkhardt was killed, and the subsequent unusual capital murder trial proceedings.

We have a new story about Mr. Lumen H. Nichols, the first postmaster of Garden Home in the 1880s and 1890s. His store and post office are believed to have been on the SE corner of the intersection.

Heart Valve Research in Garden Home A retired engineer, M. Lowell Edwards, continued his lifelong research on valves and pumps by building an artificial heart here in the low industrial building (now Power Plumbing) on the western end of Multnomah Blvd.  He was soon connected to Dr. Albert Starr and began groundbreaking work on heart valves. Your editor received one!

Other News

You are invited to our very active Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had 5 thirty-minute slide presentations last year from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Our 2016 activities included seven slideshow and speaker presentations:

  • February, Tom Shreve presented 1950’s aerial photos of Garden Home
  • March, Pat Dignan presented early photos and family life in the Hunt Club area.
  • April, Virginia Vanture presented on the Century Homes
  • May, Colin Lamb presented on history of early Thriftway, shopping center.
  • June, Elaine Shreve slideshow Garden Components and review of History & Garden Tour
  • October, Tom Shreve presented 1903 story of Murder on ‘the Garden Home Road’
  • November, Tom Shreve presented his favorite photos of Garden Home area.

2016 Events:

  • June 4, the History and Garden Tour, done with the Garden Home Gardeners.
  • August 13, outdoor Reunion of Garden Home School and Beaverton High students
  • Nov. 5, Bell Ringing at Garden Home Market, old church bell
  • Dec. 3, Participation in Bazaar, sell handmade ornaments, bookmarks
  • Dec. 12, Party at Shreve home.

 

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Get your Historic Garden Home t-shirt now for just $14 for small to XL. Larger XXL and XXXL sizes are $17. There is an additional charge of $9 to mail your shirt. They’re fun! Available at the Garden Home Market Place.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

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Dorothy McNamara Bastien and her writing group in Garden Home in the 1940s.

Dorothy McNamara Bastien, 1906-1985, and her husband Clarence lived in Garden Home in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s. Their home is now painted yellow and blue and is the first single family home, 7665 SW Oleson, south of the intersection, on the west side. Her sister Harriet Krom and family moved to Garden Home from Wisconsin in the 1950s.

Bastien home - 7665 SW Oleson

Bastien home – 7665 SW Oleson

According to Don Krom, his aunt Dorothy Bastien had a writing group in the 1930s which included Peg Bracken who wrote about women’s issues and humor and Charlotte Goldsmith whose husband flew in WWI and WWII. She wrote stories about the war and airplanes for the Saturday Evening Post and other publications. Dorothy Bastien wrote for Scholastic and also wrote books and novels.

In several articles about her son Jim Bastien, Dorothy is listed as a writer and a teacher of Latin and journalism. Her book LORI is dedicated to “Jane, Jim, Lisa and Lori.” Jim Bastien married Jane Smisor and is survived by his two daughters, both piano teachers, Lisa and Lori. Dorothy Bastien was born March 14, 1906 and died May 1, 1985. Bob Day recalls that she also wrote for the Saturday Evening Post.

The James Bastien obituary by Margalit Fox concludes with:

Mr. Bastien married Jane Smisor in 1961. They had met a few months earlier, over Prokofiev’s Seventh Sonata, and were soon performing as a duo-piano team.

Besides his wife, Mr. Bastien is survived by the couple’s two daughters, Lisa Bastien Hanss of Manhattan, and Lori Bastien Vickers of La Jolla, both piano teachers who have collaborated with their mother on many recent books; and by four grandchildren.

Peg Bracken was another member of the writing group. Peg married in the 1940s and moved to Portland, Oregon, where she worked as an advertising copywriter along with Homer Groening, father of Matt Groening.

During the 1960s and 1970s, Bracken’s writing reassured women that they did not have to be perfect to have a happy, well-managed home which resulted in her The I Hate to Cook Book. Her daughter updated her On Getting Old for the First Time in 2010 after her mother died.

Ms. Bracken died in 2007 at the age of 89 and is survived by her fourth husband, John Ohman, whom she married in 1991 and three stepchildren including Jack Ohman (Oregonian editorial cartoonist many years) of Portland.

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Don Krom memoir

My parents were George and Harriet McNamara Krom.  My family moved from Wisconsin to Garden Home in 1946 when I was 3 years old.  We bought the house on 7 acres of fruit orchard which was located on the NE corner of the intersection of Garden Home Road and Oleson Road, now Shari’s restaurant. Other corners were occupied by the Garden Home School, Gust Johnson’s gas station and Throckmorton’s store (Dairy Queen now).   About 1950 our home was moved to 7770 SW Oleson Road, where a small business has been located. Roy Floyd lived next door.  My folks moved to Garden Home because my mother’s sister, Dorothy Bastien, lived here.

Don attended Garden Home School, 1st grade through the 8th grade and then Beaverton High School for 1957-1961.

I remember when Al and Mike Dardis and I were cutting up confetti to celebrate when Dorothy Johnson was in the Miss America pageant.  We took the confetti to the gas station (her father owned) and threw it all around.  After her first runner-up win, the family took off out of here to Hollywood. Sold the station, thought they would make money off of Dorothy’s fame.  Then the Mobil station moved in there.

The lot on the NE corner was then vacant until my mother and the Reinhardt brothers built the shopping center (Lambs, Texaco station, etc.).  During this period of 1946-1960, Garden Home had a gas station, post office, barber shop, cannery, Hunt Club, store, several plant nurseries, Carlo Poutala’s Firlock Paint store (on 78th), etc.  The grocery store (Throckmorton’s) burned down in 1956.

For shopping, we drove to Multnomah, Tigard, Beaverton or Raleigh Hills or took the bus to downtown Portland.

All of my friends and I picked strawberries, beans or hops to make money in the summer.  Other times we caddied at the Portland Golf Club, babysat, mowed lawns, delivered newspapers or worked at Whitney’s Cannery.

A major organization was the Garden Home Community Church.  Major church activities for those of us in the 7th and 8th grades and high school included ski trips, swimming, coed softball teams.  Our basketball team was undefeated in 1960!

We were blessed with some outstanding teachers at Garden Home School:  Phil McGriff (band), Mrs. Lawrence, Mrs. Iris Poutala, and Mr. Polier.  Equally outstanding were parents who led Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, etc.   Such as Mrs. Grant, Mrs. Norris, Mrs. Peyton, Bob Fisher’s mom, Mrs. Whitney, Ann and Willard Johnson and Mrs. Herzog.

Garden Home had many artists, musicians and writers at this time.  Ward Hawkins, Dorothy Bastien (writer), Joe Dardis (orchestra), Erich Porshman (sculpture,artist), Willard and Ann Johnson (artists, parents of Goody and Holly) , Jim Bastien (piano pedagogue) and L.Ron Hubbard (writer science fiction) .  Erich Porshman played the cello and was a wonderful artist.  I took lessons from him.  He also repaired my mother’s washing machine on the side.  Joe Dardis, the father of Al and Mike, had a big band and played all over the nation.  He was the singer.  He was also the head of the Music Union in the 1920s and 1930s.  Goody Johnson Cable (owns Rimsky Korsakoff Coffee House in Portland and with neighbor Sally Peyton Ford, the Sylvia Beach Hotel in Newport) grew up on Vermont and owned 10 acres up there.

In the 1930s Dorothy Bastien had a writing group which included Peg Bracken who wrote about women’s issues and humor, L. Ron Hubbard writing his science fiction, Charlotte Goldsmith whoe husband flew in WWI and WWII.  She wrote stories about the war and airplanes for the Saturday Evening Post and other publications.  Dorothy Bastien wrote for Scholastic and also wrote books and novels.

Jim Bastien, Aunt Dorothy’s son was a classical pianist.  He married Jane, lived in New Orleans and they both wrote piano books.  Most new piano learners are using piano books by Jim Bastien.  He died in 2005 and had a big obit featured in the NY Times.

I have lived and worked in Rhode Island, San Francisco, was in the Navy, had a wine store in Hillsdale and sold boats in Portland.  My family has extensive property in Georgia and Florida and we travel back and forth.  My son lives in Pittsburgh.  My wife’s name is Carol.

Interview and editing by Elaine Shreve, 2017

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November 5, 2016 Bell Ringing at Lamb’s Garden Home Market

On November 5, 2016, we held another bell ringing at Lamb’s Garden Home Market (Thriftway). Many people had fun ringing the historic bell in the clock tower.  This bell was first installed in the old Community Church at the corner of (now) 71st and Garden Home Road in 1918.  The bell then moved up to the new United Methodist Church built on 81st and opened in 1961 and closed in 1994.  The bell plaque is beautifully displayed and installed in the entry of the store, the framed display done by Frank Wiggins, recently retired from the liquor store.  The bell plaque was done by Colin Lamb and Elaine Shreve.  The Lyle Tate plaque was done by the GH Methodist Church.  Janice Logan chaired this event, assisted by Board members of the Garden Home History Project.  People also enjoyed the historic photo displays.

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April 2017 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find over a hundred stories and over a thousand photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

During the month of March, visit the Garden Home History photo display at the Washington County Museum in Hillsboro. In March, identify yourself as a Garden Home resident for half-price admission. On Saturday, March 18, identify yourself as a Garden Home resident for free admission. You can also reserve the Garden Home Library’s Cultural Pass for free admission. Please call the library at 503-245-9932 to reserve your family’s pass for a certain day. Regular admission $6, Seniors/children/veterans/student $4.

Washington County Museum 503-645-5353
Hillsboro Civic Center
120 E. Main Street, Hillsboro, OR 97123
Open 10am to 5pm Wednesday through Saturday.

News

The Long Snow: Our January yards and streets have been covered in 12 or more inches of snow for a week of below freezing temperatures!  Wonderful for photos, challenge for driving.

A big snowfall brings out the cameras and reminds us of the Replogle photos from the 1920s. The Replogles were related to Moses and Sarah Huffaker and their home was always called the Huffaker place, no matter who lived there.

New stories on the website

1903 Halloween Murder on the Garden Home Road! We previously posted a story about the other Garden Home road discussing how the moniker of Garden Home road used to refer to the route of SW Broadway Drive to SW Patton Road to SW Shattuck Road to SW Oleson Road. We discovered this fact when we stumbled across a story about the 1903 Halloween fatal shooting of Adolph Burkhardt on “the Garden Home road” by Samuel Bauman. This new story is the follow-up describing the details of slaying, the feud between two farmers that precipitated the killing, the mystery about where Adolph Burkhardt was killed, and the subsequent unusual capital murder trial proceedings.

We updated the the story about Leona Whitney to include new details about her popular chalkboard messages at the road by the Whitney’s Cannery, now the Old Market Pub.  We also updated the story about the Garden Home Cooperative Cannery to describe how it was first built over in the Progress shopping center and then built in Garden Home for its first birthday. Besides memberships, one of the co-op’s first fund raising events was a school carnival.

Heart Valve Research in Garden Home A retired engineer, M. Lowell Edwards, continued his lifelong research on valves and pumps by building an artificial heart here in the low industrial building (now Power Plumbing) on the western end of Multnomah Blvd.  He was soon connected to Dr. Albert Starr and began groundbreaking work on heart valves. Your editor received one!

We have a new story about Mr. Lumen H. Nichols, the first postmaster of Garden Home in the 1880s and 1890s. His store and post office are believed to have been on the SE corner of the intersection.

Warren Cook contributed an article about the Blue Bus service, owned by the Tualatin Valley Bus Company, that served the Garden Home area prior to acquisition by TriMet in 1970.

On November 5, 2016, we held another bell ringing at Lamb’s Garden Home Market (Thriftway). Many people had fun ringing the historic bell in the clock tower.  This bell was first installed in the old Community Church at the corner of (now) 71st and Garden Home Road in 1918.  The bell then moved up to the new United Methodist Church built on 81stand opened in 1961 and closed in 1994. View the photo gallery here.

Other News

You are invited to our very active Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had 5 thirty-minute slide presentations last year from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. March 13 will be a special meeting for the public with refreshments and summaries by the Chair and the Treasurer. The plans for the year’s activities will be shared. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Our 2016 activities included seven slideshow and speaker presentations:

  • February, Tom Shreve presented 1950’s aerial photos of Garden Home
  • March, Pat Dignan presented early photos and family life in the Hunt Club area.
  • April, Virginia Vanture presented on the Century Homes
  • May, Colin Lamb presented on history of early Thriftway, shopping center.
  • June, Elaine Shreve slideshow Garden Components and review of History & Garden Tour
  • October, Tom Shreve presented 1903 story of Murder on ‘the Garden Home Road’
  • November, Tom Shreve presented his favorite photos of Garden Home area.

2016 Events:

  • June 4, the History and Garden Tour, done with the Garden Home Gardeners.
  • August 13, outdoor Reunion of Garden Home School and Beaverton High students
  • Nov. 5, Bell Ringing at Garden Home Market, old church bell
  • Dec. 3, Participation in Bazaar, sell handmade ornaments, bookmarks
  • Dec. 12, Party at Shreve home.

Board of Directors, Garden Home History Project, 2016:

Chair: Elaine Shreve
Vice-Chair: Janice Logan
Secretary: Patsy VandeVenter
Treasurer: Marie Pacella

Board Members: (voting) John Pacella, Stan and Susan Houseman, Sasha Kaplan, Carole Vranizan, Louise Cook Jones, Bob and Delia Day, Mark Kajitani (Served for partial term:  Christina Mauroni, Ginny McCarthy)

Advisory Board:  Serving the project with special skills, services or resources: Bob & Sharon Cram, Tom Shreve, Virginia Vanture, Jan Fredrickson

2017 presentations and events will be planned at February 13 meeting.

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Get your Historic Garden Home t-shirt now for just $14 for small to XL. Larger XXL and XXXL sizes are $17. There is an additional charge of $9 to mail your shirt. They’re fun! Available at the Garden Home Market Place.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

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Bus Service in Garden Home

Krom house being moved (note also the Blue Bus)

Krom house being moved (note also the Blue Bus)

(Ed: In the 1940s and ‘50s) There were two busses that served Garden Home and both ‘Blue Busses’ were owned by The Tualatin Valley Bus Company.  They left from the Trailways Terminal in downtown Portland – directly across 5th Avenue from the Multnomah County Courthouse: (1) The “Metzger Bus” that came from Portland (through Multnomah, followed Garden Home Road and after leaving Garden Home went on to Metzger, and (2) The “Maplewood Bus” that came from Portland thru Maplewood, then on to Garden Home, terminating in Rose Garden Village development (from 90th to  92nd on the North side of Garden Home Road) – and returned to Portland.  Service on both busses was from 6:00 am to midnight 7 days a week. A prominent Garden Home resident who was heavily involved in Garden Home Methodist Church, Boy Scouts, softball, and other youth activities would normally drive one or the other busses each day.

Warren Cook, Feb. 2010

 

(Ed: The TriMet Maplewood line used to run down Garden Home Road in the 1970s and 1980s. We are unsure when TriMet ceased running bus service down the portion of SW Garden Home Road west of the Garden Home/Oleson intersection.

Link to Wikipedia article about the Blue Bus Lines.)

 

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1903 Halloween night slaying on “the Garden Home road”

Victim of a feud

Victim of a feud

We recently posted a story about the other Garden Home road discussing how the moniker of Garden Home road used to refer to the route of SW Broadway Drive to SW Patton Road to SW Shattuck Road to SW Oleson Road. We discovered this fact when we stumbled across a story about the 1903 Halloween fatal shooting of Adolph Burkhardt on “the Garden Home road” by Samuel Bauman. This story is the follow-up describing the details of slaying, the feud between two farmers that precipitated the killing, the mystery about where Adolph Burkhardt was killed, and the subsequent unusual capital murder trial proceedings.

Finding the story

University of Oregon newspaper archive

University of Oregon newspaper archive

While searching the University of Oregon’s archive of Oregon newspapers for stories about Garden Home, we stumbled upon the story of a 1903 Halloween slaying on “the Garden Home road”.

Sidenote: name spellings vary from article to article in the Oregonian. We use the spellings from the later articles: Baumann becomes Bauman, Haywood becomes Hayward.

Who, what, where and when

  • Illustration of parties involved

    Illustration of parties involved

    The victim: Adolph Burkhardt, shot in the lungs

  • The accused: Samuel Bauman, a farmer living on “the Garden Home road”
  • The accusation: Bauman shot Burkhardt with a .44 caliber rifle from 100 yards
  • Where: “the Garden Home road” near Bertha
  • When: just before midnight, Halloween, 1903
  • The witness: Harry Fuller (Burkhardt’s friend)
  • The backstory: a nasty feud between neighboring farmers, the Bauman and Hayward families (Burkhardt and Fuller were walking to visit the Hayward boys)

The feud

Bauman, the man who fired two rifle shots at Burkhardt and Fuller, had, it appears, been in constant trouble with the sons of H. D. Hayward, the farmer for whose house on the Garden Home road the young men were headed. Dogs had been killed by Bauman and by the Hayward boys in return.

– The Oregonian, describing the feud

The victim and the witness

Dead Man a Portlander

Dead Man a Portlander

Adolph Burkhardt was 20 years of age. Together with Harry Fuller, Burkhardt roomed at a stable at Union avenue and East Alder street (near the east end of the Morrison bridge), where Burkhardt worked as a team driver. Burkhardt’s brother married H. D. Hayward’s daughter. Fuller accompanied the night Burkhardt was shot and killed and was the only witness to the killing.

Where?!

The Oregonian reported that Burkhardt was shot on “the Garden Home road” near Bertha. Fuller stated they left town at 8:00 PM (presumably he meant downtown Portland). Fuller stated they “went up the road from Corbett street, and walked slowly up the hill.” They reached the vicinity of the Hayward and Bauman properties three and a half  hours later, around 11:30 PM.

It appears that road on which Burkhardt was killed was neither today’s SW Garden Home Road nor the “other” Garden Home road found on maps of the era and referenced in various Oregonian articles and advertisements.

It is possible that the term “the Garden Home road” referred to either of the two main routes from downtown Portland to Garden Home, a relatively significant community and road hub at the time. In this case, the “Garden Home road” the Oregonian referred may have been the route of SW Terwilliger Blvd. to SW Capitol Hwy. to SW Garden Home Rd. The Bertha train depot was located near the junction of SW Bertha Blvd. and SW Capitol Hwy. Our best guess is that Burkhardt was killed on today’s SW Capitol Hwy near the intersection with SW Bertha Blvd. in Hillsdale. Alternatively, it is possible that Burkhardt was killed on SW Shattuck Rd. near the intersection with SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy.

Witness Fuller’s version

  • Fuller's version

    Fuller’s version

    Burkhardt and Fuller were firing a pistol “to celebrate Halloween” as they walked to Hayward’s property.

  • Fuller reported Bauman shot twice at them from 100 yards, the second shot striking the fleeing Burkhardt in the back and passing through his lungs.
  • Fuller later admitted to firing his pistol between Bauman’s two shots.
  • Burkhardt died on “the Garden Home road”. His last words were “I am shot. I’m going”.

Farmer Hayward’s version

  • Hayward's version

    Hayward’s version

    Hayward reported hearing 35 shots in the vicinity that night, 12 or 15 of which were rifle shots fired from the road.

  • …he went to Bauman’s house and called out: “You have shot a fellow.” Bauman answered: “I don’t care. You shot my dog.”

Mrs. Bauman’s version

Mrs. Bauman's version

Mrs. Bauman’s version

Shooting began all around us, and finally my husband said that they might be trying to kill our stock. He took the rifle and went out to the barn and fired twice into the brush. We didn’t know that he had hit anyone until Hayward came and called him.

The trial

  • Bauman on trial

    Bauman on trial

    If found guilty, Bauman was to be hanged.

  • Fuller claimed to recognize Bauman as the shooter in the dark, but failed to recognize Bauman in daylight the next day.
  • Fuller’s version of the events differed somewhat from his initial statements.
  • Jurors directly questioned witness Harry Fuller.
  • Jurors were incredulous when Fuller stated he carried Burkhardt toward Bauman, to within 10 feet, with intention of going to Hayward’s house.
  • Hayward’s character attacked for prior crimes (stealing a keg of whiskey, stealing a wagon load of corn, and theft of money)
  • Harry Fuller is the most consummate liar on Earth. He is utterly irresponsible, a hoodlum and a tough. H. D. Hayward is a jailbird and a deadbeat and was run out of Castle Rock. These things I will prove. On the say-so of such characters, the state expects to hang a man who is a hard-working farmer, honest and law-abiding, and a man of family.

The verdict

The jury in the Samuel Bauman murder case, which established the precedent of asking the trial Judge if the trial could not be brought to a conclusion because they thought enough evidence had been submitted on which to form a conclusion, also did another very unusual thing. To emphasize their verdict that they did not believe Bauman killed Adolph Burkhardt, the following additional clause was attached to it:

“The jury arrived at the above verdict (not guilty) owning to having a doubt as to whether or not Burkhardt was killed by the bullet from the gun of the defendant.”

Many persons who heard the evidence submitted at the trial express the opinion that Harry Fuller and H. B. Hayward did not tell all they knew concerning the events that occurred on the fatal night.

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Lumen H. Nichols and Ann M. Nichols

1890 Post Office and store, Garden Home, Oregon. Mr Nichols, Postmaster.

1890 Post Office and store, Garden Home, Oregon. Mr Nichols, Postmaster.

 

The circa 1890s photo of the first general store and post office in Garden Home shows Mr. Lumen H. Nichols standing against the picket fence.  The building has a cough remedy poster and a typical “Wanted” poster attached to the front of the store.

This store and the William Clemmens home are the only two buildings noted on the 1886 Re-Survey of the 1857 Millers-Ferry road.  This survey shows the east-west road as “Nicholl Street”, presumably after the Nichols family, different spelling.  The northbound road is listed as “Rex Street.” Rex Hill is between Newberg and Sherwood off of Pacific Highway 99 and the name of a well-known winery.  Marge Davenport quotes an early  club president of the 1905 Portland Automobile Club in her book Best of the Old Northwest as saying “…improvements were needed to get Portland ‘out of the mud.’  W.J. Clemens also cited work on the Rex Hill, south of Tigardville (now Tigard), which was notoriously bad, as needed ‘to give Portland an opening into the Willamette Valley and to allow tourists from California and Southern Oregon to come to Portland without being mired.”

The store and post office are believed to have been on the SE corner of the intersection.  Ginny Mapes notes in The way it was that “Chris Jager moved the old Nichols building across the road to the Huffaker place” which was located just west of the school property.  He then built the two-story white building on that SE corner of the intersection of what became Garden Home Road and Oleson Road.

The photo of the original post office can also be found in The Oregon Companion: An Historical Gazetteer of the Useful, the Curious …, By Richard H. Engeman, Pg 149 with the following caption:

A Multnomah County suburban district with a “mildly sentimental” name, Garden Home gained a post office in 1882, and an inter-urban electric railroad to Portland in 1908. Garden Home became the junction point for the Oregon Electric Railway’s lines west to Forest Grove and south to Salem and Eugene. By 1915, with a population estimate of 350, it was reported that “many Portland office men make this their home. Dairying, farming, fruit growing, poultry raising and gardening.” The Portland Hunt Club and the Portland Golf Club were nearby. Garden Home’s exclusive cachet has diminished, the trains went in 1933, the post office closed in 1954 [*], and the area is engulfed in a more generalized suburbia.

* Today, the post office continues inside Lamb’s Garden Home Market.

Lumen Nichols is incorrectly listed as Leeman Nichols on recent documents although he is listed in some older documents and on his gravestone as L.H. Nichols.  The Oregon Post Offices 1847-1952 book  by Richard Helbock lists him as Lumen Nichols as does the following book.

Lumen H. Nichols is profiled in the History of Oregon, an 1893 publication by Rev. H.K. Hines D.D., of hundreds of Oregon’s leading citizens of the time.  Lumen, the eldest of 11 children, was born in 1832 in Vermont and was “economical and industrious” as a child.  His first wife died after 5 years of marriage.  In 1863 he married Anna Thurston.  During the civil war he was listed as a sutler, a person who maintained a store on an army post to sell provisions and supplies to the soldiers.  He also owned a home and carpenter shop for large manufacturing and coopering (building barrels and casks.)

In 1867 Lumen and Anna came to Oregon “by water” as did many other people who were not driving cattle and carrying farm equipment.  He initially bought property in Oswego and then in 1871 came to the Garden Home area where he bought 85 acres of “rich land in a choice locality” on which he resided.

From Oregon Post Offices 1847 – 1982 by Richard W. Helbock, PhD:

[Lumen] built a good store, and in this he keeps a general stock of goods, and attends to the duties of the post office, as he has been the efficient Postmaster for the past ten years…They are highly respected people through the county and are deeply attached to the State where they have passed the last twenty years.

At the Crescent Grove Cemetery on Greenburg, Lumen’s gravestone reads: July 17, 1832-Oct. 17, 1902.  His wife Anna’s stone reads: Dec.-27-1840-Dec.-4-1933.   Their daughter Nellie died after a horse accident, her stone reads: 1875-1890 and shows a horse and girl and tenderly lists her age as 15 years, 6 months, 13 days.

Lumen’s brother George’s tombstone reads: Jan. 4, 1846-May 29, 1876 with this inscription: ‘Tis hard to give thee up dear brother/ To know that we no more shall meet/ Until we too shall cross the river/ Our loving parents there to greet.

Clara Kear is quoted about the store in Garden Home, the way it was by Virginia Mapes as “It carried all kinds of foodstuffs and tools.  It supplied the staples a family would need like sugar and flour… Outside under the trees were two huge barrels.  One was for vinegar.”

Chris Jager was a young Danish man who apparently jumped ship and found his way to Garden Home where he lived with the Nichols.  He was given Power of Attorney for Mrs. Nichols in 1907, after L.H. died in 1902. He platted the first lots and is listed to act for Mrs. Nichols in subsequent land sales. He was said to be “adopted” by Mrs. Nichols and he cared for her as she became more disabled.  She enjoyed time on the front porch with her parrot who famously greeted ladies with “Hello girls, Hello girls.”  The parrot would set up a crying to mimic the sound of a young neighbor boy confined by the fence, to create a great racket.  Chris was a talented civic minded man who built a two-story store with living quarters in the back and community space on the second floor.  This was used for events, dances, church, and the first class of Garden Home school children.  This store was referred to as the White Store to differentiate it from the “Red Store” which was further east on Garden Home Road, across from the train station and switching tracks.  It later became known as Upchurch’s and Throckmorton’s. Click here to read more about Chris Jager and his store.

Tombstone of Christian Jager at Cresenct Grove Cemetery

Tombstone of Christian Jager at Cresenct Grove Cemetery

The Chris Jager tombstone at the Crescent Grove Cemetery reads: Christian N. Jager  1868-1937.  Chris dug a large well at the back of the property and connected pipes to the community for their use.  When problems occurred, the well water was shut off to the community.  Chris was an important resident in developing early Garden Home.

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Miles Lowell Edwards, Heart Valve Inventor

The long low industrial building at 6611 SW Multnomah Boulevard, now the home of Power Plumbing, was formerly a research lab where the famed Starr-Edwards heart valve was developed by M. Lowell Edwards and Dr. Albert Starr.

From the entry for Miles Lowell Edwards (1898-1982) in the Oregon History Center Oregon Encyclopedia:

On September 21, 1960, Starr successfully inserted a “ball-in-cage” prosthetic valve into a patient’s mitral valve, which was severely diseased because of rheumatic fever.  Within two years, Edwards and Starr had invented a life-saving aortic valve prosthesis, which would save the lives of several hundred thousand patients around the world.  In April 1961, Edwards became an early pioneer in the biomedical high-tech field when he founded Edwards Laboratories in Santa Ana, California, to manufacture high-quality valve prostheses.

Lowell Edwards grew up in Newberg and he himself suffered from rheumatic fever with a very slow but full recovery. Rheumatic fever was a common complication of untreated scarlet fever or a strep throat before the age of antibiotics.

Edwards graduated from Oregon State University with a degree in electrical engineering in 1924.  He worked on various pump problems with Weyerhaeuser Timber and Boeing Aircraft and other businesses.  After retirement in 1947, Edwards began investigating the heart as a pump problem, designing a prosthetic heart.

Edwards began a research relationship with Dr. Albert Starr, a heart surgeon at the University of Oregon Medical School (OHSU) in 1958.  Dr. Starr persuaded him to focus on a heart valve instead of the whole heart.

Colin Lamb of Lambs Garden Home Thriftway first notified us of this connection with the heart valve research.  Colin had information from Arne Solberg who was Edwards’ manufacturing chief.  Solberg said that Edwards moved into the “New Building” in 1955 where the early research with Dr. Starr was done.  By the 1960s, Edwards had moved to developing the Edwards Lifesciences laboratories in Santa Ana, California.

Nolan Taira, Director of Global Communications and Brand for Edwards Lifesciences, confirmed that Edwards conducted early research on the Starr-Edwards heart valve at his Garden Home laboratory.

Mike Davis, the owner and developer of Power Plumbing (site of the former research building), confirms that the photo of M. Lowell Edwards taken at a door of the building with corrugated aluminum siding was indeed one of the Power Plumbing buildings.  Mike bought the building from Jerry and Ilene Dorring in 1998.

Editor: Edwards Lifesciences continues to be a leader in cardiac medical device manufacturing. During 2013 heart surgery, I received a bovine aortic heart valve from Edwards Lifesciences Corporation.

Elaine Shreve, November 2016

The Starr-Edwards valve is a silicone ball that is held in a small cage that is sown into the heart.

The Starr-Edwards valve is a silicone ball that is held in a small cage that is sewn into the heart.

We subsequently received this note and photo from Sally McLaughlin, a long-time operating room lead nurse for Dr. Starr and his heart valve replacement surgeries:

I came to OHSU as an Operating Room nurse. Dr. Starr was the new vascular surgeon from New York City.  The general OR staff did his cases.  Margaret Shea oriented me to the current cardiovascular surgeries that were being done.  Dr. Starr was a perfectionist and I soon was scheduled for his cases.  I was able to assist with research procedures which he was doing on the top floor of Mackenzie Hall.

Engineer Lowell Edwards was collaborating with Dr. Starr and developed the first ball/cage heart valve and in 1963 we did the first successful triple heart valve replacement.   I was able to visit the Edwards Laboratory in California where the valve cuffs were meticulously sewn on by hand.  I remember Mr. Edwards as a tall thin quiet man who visited the OR once or twice.

Kathleen Singer “Sally” McLaughlin

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October 2016 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find over a hundred stories and over a thousand photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

November 5, 2016 – Ring that Bell!  Adults and children are invited to ring the historic bell in the Garden Home Thriftway’s bell tower on Saturday, November 5, 10AM to 3PM. This 100 year old bell was first hung in the 1918 Community Church of Garden Home. You will also see historic displays and photos and talk with Garden Home history people. Presented by the Garden Home History Project and hosted by the Garden Home Market staff who will withstand all that bell ringing! Garden Home Market, 7410 SW Oleson Road. Questions: Janice Logan 503-750-9221.

We begin most regular meetings with a 30-minute history presentation at 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center, 7475 SW Oleson Rd, on the second Monday of the month. Free. We start and end promptly.

  • November 14, 2016 – Enjoy our favorite vintage photos of early Garden Home on Nov. 14 at 6:30 pm. Aerial photos from 1936 and 1956, the old store, school, church, road ruts, baseball teams, dairy cows, Jack’s burro and more!

New stories on website

We’ve posted a photo gallery and a collection stories collected during the August 13, 2016 Beaverton High and Garden Home School Reunion held on a lovely Saturday at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We estimated about a hundred people joined us for the event.

Our Beaverton High School Chronology story contains excerpts from an extensive chronology of Beaverton High School by Lisa Sandmire, derived from past issues of the Beaverton High newspaper, The Hummer, and other historical sources.

Other News

The Beat Goes On Marching Band

The Beat Goes On Marching Band

From Patti Waitman-Ingebretsen  (Maplewood girl)….Attention Garden Home and Beaverton HS alums – Here is your chance to play your instrument once again with others from your era.  Garden Home Rec Center gym is the location for rehearsals of “The Beat Goes on Marching Band”, ages 18 and older who played in high school, college, military bands.  This is your chance to enjoy our favorite rehearsal venue (Garden Home). We are the one having way too much fun and we invite you to join us. The band also includes color guard, dance and majorettes so we invite all to check out our website and let us know so we can welcome you.  Also, in exchange for allowing TBGO to utilize rehearsal spaces in the building, TBGO band members are volunteers who decorate and serve at Garden Homes\ yearly  December Holiday event. Visit TheBeatGoesOnMB.org for more info.

We have identified Century Homes in Garden Home that were built before 1916. The program is meant to honor and appreciate the older homes in our community and the role they’ve played in our history. The home owners have been notified that they may participate in this program of a small ceremony of placing a Century Home plaque beside the front door and accepting a nice pamphlet with the history of Garden Home and their home. The attractive plaque notes the age of the house and does not affect the sale or any changes in the property.

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Get your Historic Garden Home t-shirt now for just $14 for small to XL. Larger XXL and XXXL sizes are $17. There is an additional charge of $9 to mail your shirt. They’re fun! Available at the Garden Home Market Place.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

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Detailed chronology of Beaverton High School

Below is a collection of notes about the history of Beaverton High School prepared by Lisa Sandmire for the Beaverton High School centennial celebration. She used Beaverton High School’s archive of past issues of The Hummer and other sources as noted. We obtained Lisa’s notes in July 2016. We thank Lisa for permission to publish her notes here.

1842

First school in Washington County opens. It was an Indian mission and open to all.

1852

Mary Ann Spencer Watts holds classes in a log cabin near her home in Beaverton. She came from Cincinnati, Ohio via Cape Horn on a boat trip that took 6 months.

1871

More than 250 people in Beaverton. New school is a 1 room frame structure, 2 rooms came later. Pot bellied stoves provided heat and there was no plumbing. A 6 foot fence was needed to keep livestock out of the play yard.

1890

Total costs for the school for the year, including salaries, were $635.25. Student population was 146.

1906

School board forbids football on school grounds. School has 3 rooms and a 9th grade. The board purchased 2 pans for students to drain their umbrellas in.

1908

New woodshed for school cost $108.00. 39 new desks cost $179.00. 10th grade was added. 4 room, 2 story structure with full cement basement with heating and ventilation was built to house grad and high school through 1915.

1911

School clock, a gong, 6 dozen noiseless erasers and a drum purchased.

1915

School removed to make room for the new high school. Cost of new school: $21,500. It is 3 stories, 21 rooms, (no additions made until student body reaches 400). Fall of 1915 a junior class was added.

1916

Beaverton High becomes a standard, 4 year high school. US elects the first woman to congress

1917

The US entered WWI, declaring war on Germany.

1918

The 1918 flu pandemic infected 500 million people worldwide, killing 50-100 million (3-5% of the world’s population.

1919

The signing of the Treaty of Versailles ended World War I.

1920

First Annual published. It is called Ee’na, which means “beaver” in the language of the local native tribe. It will be called Ee’na until the 1930 annual when the name is changed to “The Beaver”. Student body in the 1919-’20 school year was 65.

1921

First Hummer published, “Beaverton Hummer Special”. Edited by the junior class. Printed in the Commerce Department. First cafeteria established. Food is made by the Home Economics class. First football team (The Hummer, May 1923).

1922

Mr. Mike Metzler joins faculty as a coach and teacher. He stayed with Beaverton High for 31 years. There are 130 students and 8 teachers. Basketball court was directly above the school office! No football field – games were played in a local lumberyard. Football practice held behind the Congregational church or in a lot across the street from school. Student body took on the well-being of an orphan in the near east. Tennis courts installed where the auditorium currently stands. Student body in the 1922-’23 school year was 130.

1923

Stage curtain purchased for stage at one end of the study hall. No annual published this year due to small class size (only 13 graduating seniors), lack of interest (per Ruth Pasley), and the fact that debt from the previous year’s annual was still outstanding. Women’s suffragist Alice Paul introduced The Equal Rights Amendment to the Senate.

1925

First school buses. Old stage enlarged for play productions.

1926

Freshman initiation was a common event. Land for a football field is purchased. (Hummer, 9/26/29) Hummer is printed outside the school for the first time in order to “make it better in quality & appearance” (1926 yearbook).

1927

First Fire Squad organized. Metzler organized this group to re-direct wayward boys. Geraldine Sanford begins as a teacher. The first motion picture with sound, “The Jazz Singer,” was released. Basketball team at BHS was nicknamed “the orange and black onion growers” and played the “painter boys” of Rasmussen paint Co., the Beaverton Alumni and the Baby Badgers of Pacific University.

1928

Basketball pit covered over.

1929

First changes to the original building. West gym, auditorium and classrooms added for $35,000. Architect is CN Freeman, Builder is FS Starland. Kiwanis Club presented a plaque and organized the dedication ceremony (Hummer, 12/18/29). Woodshed built. New roof on school.

The Wall Street Crash of 1929, also known as Black Tuesday, occurred at the end of the year and was the worst stock market crash at the time. A 10-year recession, known as the Great Depression, began as a result, affecting every industrialized Western country.

1930

The Dust Bowl disrupted the ecology and agriculture of both the U.S. and Canada. With the Great Plains experiencing the worst drought and wind erosion, the Dust Bowl left over 500,000 Americans homeless.

1931

Bus garage was constructed. It held 10 buses and cost $4,500.00.

1932

Amelia Earhart took her famous solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean.

1933

PA system installed for use in assemblies and games. Seats in certain classrooms are arranged bleacher style.

Prohibition, a nationwide ban on the sale, production, transportation and importation of alcohol, ended with the ratification of the 21st Amendment.

1934

“Only girl President of the student body” elected – Margaret Dickman. (Hummer, May 1936).

The Indian Reorganization Act, also known as the Indian New Deal or Wheeler-Howard Act, was signed into law. The act worked to reestablish and protect many of the native tribes that were previously encouraged to assimilate with American society.

1915-1935

Enrollment increases 333.33%.

1937

Annex built across Erickson street to house the school buses and workshop. Property is purchased from the Erickson estate. Land purchased for new grade school (Merle Davies). The architect is CN Freeman, contractor is George Manges. Magazine drive to raise funds to build grandstands nets $350.

1938

Grandstands built, costing $700.00. The wood for the grandstands was recycled from the 1910 school building which was demolished. Football team had an undefeated season under coach Marble Cook. County football champions.

Orson Welles’ broadcast of “The War of the Worlds” caused widespread panic when listeners didn’t know the broadcast was fictitious.

1939

Football lights purchased by students for $1,500.00. Football scoreboard made by McCready lumber for the school. Ticket office, featuring 3 aisles and windows, was purchased for main gate on north side of the school. Bernice Connoly begins teaching at BHS. 10% of 230 BHS students test positive for tuberculosis (Hummer, Dec., 1939). First Hummer articles published talking about war and patriotism (November issue).

1940

Four new buses added to the fleet. Bus garage partially damaged and 5 busses destroyed by fire for a loss of $15,000.00. $8,000.00 spent on new equipment for fire losses. Garage was later reconstructed. Hot water heater added, new lighting in all classrooms, the “old shed” is converted to locker rooms, complete new interior paint job throughout the school. Grace Larson elected second female Student Body President. Frank Emmons, class of 1936 drafted to the Philadelphia Eagles. Flu epidemic in December. 32% of student body (of 487) out sick.

1941

New trophy case purchased. “Evacuee Adopted by French Class” (Hummer 4/23/41).

Japan declared war on the United States by attacking the U.S. naval base in Pearl Harbor. Six U.S. ships were sunk, 2,402 Americans lost their lives and 1,247 were wounded.

WWII defense stamp sales begin. War theme references everywhere – “Eat For Defense”, “Red, White & Blue Clothing Day”. Blackouts in Beaverton. Evening activities moved to earlier times in order to observe blackout air raid evacuation drills (Hummer, 12/17/41).

1942

Book drive for USOs. 10K war stamp sales goal. Reference to a “service Flag” with a star representing a student enlistee, Hummer 10/14/42. Student Aiko Yoshihara (female) in a “Japanese evacuation center” in SE Idaho. There are 10,000 Japanese interned at the camp. Alumni Doris Noel one of the first 2 women enrolled in the school of engineering at Oregon State College. 29 freshman hold part time jobs so they can buy more war stamps (Hummer, 11/11/42). Victory bell sold to church, proceeds used to buy more war bonds (Hummer, 11/11/42). Hummer editorial encourages civilian defense. Girl Reserves organize “Ditty Bag Drive” of money and needed articles for servicemen. 93 copies of Hummer sent to boys in service. Organization of teams for the new fad-yo-yo twirling. The 4 positions were string changer, booster, spinner and twirler.

1943

Midterm goal of 30K in war bond (stamp?) sales via auction and classroom competitions (Hummer 12/1/43). Schools At War scrapbook created. Schools at War was a program organized by the Secretary of the Treasury, War Savings Staff. High schools were encouraged to maintain scrapbooks detailing their war efforts. There was a scrapbook competition in Salem. Trying to locate BHS Scrapbook (Lisa Sandmire). Hummer keeps track of boys in service via regular “Keeping Up With The Troops” articles.

1944

9/27/44 – Enrollment: 431 (134 freshmen, 133 sophomores, 100 juniors, 64 seniors). School cafeteria opens. Run by 2 staff and 6 home-ec students will help. They will serve a veggie, meat or cheese dish with bread and butter. Dessert and milks extra. Third female student body president, Mollie O’Donnell. School facelift: new darkroom, fully equipped. Shop has new cabinets. New boys lockers. Industrial art room is enclosed and painted. War bond sales: goal of selling 35K by 12/7 to buy a landing barge. Serviceman will be admitted free to sporting events during school year.

Germany’s final major offensive of World War II, The Battle of the Bulge, began. It would be the deadliest battle for the United States during the war.

12/20/44 – Breaking ground of new. Bond drive $55,815.40, surpassing goal. Will pay for landing barge & other war supplies.

1945

Harold Warren Dobyns awarded Bronze Star. Prom Tips: clean hair, Either pile neatly on top of head or put a velvet bow in to hold it back. Maybe a sequin beany. Only wear a small corsage as a large one isn’t appropriate during the war. Let the boy open doors for you. Tell your date he looks nice, too. Boys, help her with her wrap. Help her into the car. Dance the first two dances with her and at least every third dance. Junior boys will be expected to exchange one dance with a patroness. Serve her refreshments. FDR death, flag at half-mast (reported in 4/18/45 Hummer). 15 BHS student soldiers have died in action so far in WWII (4/18/45 Hummer). Within 2 weeks, BHS lost its student body president and vice-president, senior class president and vice-president, pep club president, Hummer editor and annual editor. (4/18/45 Hummer). May 1945-VE day honored with special assembly.

3/21/45 – Remodeling of gymnasium. Concert scheduled to raise funds for student center. Over 70K war bond sales. Goal of 100K by end of year. Refinishing of gym underway – replacing wall surface with plaster up to 6’ and acoustic plaster 6’ to ceiling, acoustic ceiling.

4/18/45 – Students prepare for VE day, assembly. Clothing drive for those in need in Europe. Mobile Tuberculosis tests completed all BHS students. BHS alum ‘39 not graduate, Akira ”Skeeter” Kaga, Japanese American tells of his hurt over local feeling toward Japanese Americans. Building plans in question – plans made for student union center, many favor a large, indoor pool. Some would like tennis courts or new track. Jack Selves recalls moment of flag raising on Iwo Jima. State law passes requiring kids to stay in school until age 16 or the completion of 12 years of school.

5/16/45 – 60 boys from class of ’45 have entered the armed services. Jim Eastman, Pharmacist mate 3/c, class of ’42, killed in Iwo Jima.

VE DAY 5/8/45

1945 grads:

OSU-5

U of O-2

Multnomah college-1

Northwestern business college-1

University of Washington-1

Other colleges-3

Coast guard-3

Navy-5

Merchant Marines-2

Army-4

Working-10

Staying home-4

Nov ’45 vandals damage 10 BHS windows. Cost of repair $70.00.

Trivia as of Nov 1945:

Fire squad is oldest active organization in the school.

Tex Twyford is the first discharged serviceman to return to BHS.

School site was purchased from Meier and Frank.

14 seniors on the football team.

44 girls in glee club.

When this senior class started in 1942, they numbered 143. Now there are 98.

In 1926, the Hummer was a 3 column paper with holes punched so it could go into a notebook.

BHS has 510 students.

Beaverton becomes BUHS.

Construction on new wing begins.

Gym remodel to be finished in summer. Floor re-sanded and refinished, new paint, backstage remodeling, halls to dressing re tiled, total cost 2K.

Service flag presented to BHS with large blue star representing 450 boys in war and 15 gold stars representing boys killed in action.

10/3/45 – BHS enrollment is 510 (only room for 400). New bus purchased for football transport. Main objective of school year raising funds for student union.

10/31/45 – Victory Loan Drive 10K goal.

11/21/45 – Senior class has 98 students (143 when they were sophomores).

12/19/45 – Students show interest in atomic bomb. BHS doubled war bond / victory loan drive. New band uniforms. 6 cafeteria workers served 45 students per day.

1946

1/30/46 – BHS expansion plan goes to voters with a $280,000 bond measure (drawing in Hummer of plans). Current building max is 400 and there are 512 students. Estimated next year enrollment is 575. If bond doesn’t pass, the home economics department will be closed to make room.

2/20/46 – Tight skirt fad is a bit scandalous. Bond election on 2/23 for 280K for construction of addition of facilities to help with crowding. Juke box controversy – mistreatment and arguing about selections. Students use it to dance before school and during lunch.

3/27/46 – 280K bond passes. Boys haircut fad “The Princeton”.

4/24/46 – Burglars rob school safe. Band Director, Frank Bushnell, retiring after 16 yrs.

10/9/46 – Steady increase in enrollment: 510 in 1945, 545 in 1946. Bond vote deemed invalid, new election in February. Fashions – turtlenecks and saddle shoes, nubby sweaters, kick pleat skirts, cotton dresses, cashmere sweaters, angora sweaters, peter pan collars, belts for girls. It costs 40 cents to go to the movies

11/6/46 – Hummer gets top National honors for 4th time. ‘Beaver’ annual wins ‘First All American’ award.

11/27/46 – Seven more boys leave BHS for service

12/18/46 – Second bond vote increases it to $325,000 (from $280,000). Former BHS student, Bob Bastian, goes on Antarctic exploration with Navy.

The United States became the first and only country to detonate an atomic bomb. Both Hiroshima and Nagasaki were hit, killing an estimated 150,000 to 246,000 people.

In the 1946 student handbook, excused absences were given for: conventions, fairs, hunting, fishing, athletic games, work and visiting.

1947

1/29/47 – ⅖ bond vote. Installation of new school laundry. $325,000 bond passes for construction of new wing of school.

May 1947 – 36 seniors going to college, most to Oregon State, then Oregon, Monmouth, Willamette, Pacific, Lewis and Clark, Marylhurst.

5/21/47 – All building addition bids rejected. Plans being revised.

10/1/47 – New construction estimate 251K – new shop room on west end, east wing 6 classrooms and study hall, 2 health rooms, 4 washrooms on ground floor. School capacity of 840.

10/29/47 – New modern library has 7,000 books, fluorescent lighting, 24 tables, capacity of 144 new field and stands getting renovated. Behind stands will be a practice field and softball diamond with added lighting. Tower is torn down from grandstand – originally constructed as watch tower in WWII. Total cost of running buses in ’46-’47 school year: $14,378.70. Covered a total of 11,491 miles and 500 students served. Forty eight percent of class of 1948 attend college.

Jackie Robinson of the Brooklyn Dodgers became the first African-American to play baseball in the Major Leagues.

1948

1/21/48 – Fashion – Gibson girl blouses, ballerina skirts, cable knit sweaters.

4/21/48 – New intercom system installed in BUHS (cost $2500.00)

5/19/48 – *photo of new east wing in Hummer. This summer, plans to build new cafeteria, student center and locker rooms. Cafeteria will cost $55,000. Al Walker, 1st in state for high hurdles. Driver’s Ed added to curriculum. Fall 1948 enrollment is 690.

10/5/48 – Construction finished including new field areas. 6 student librarian and one head librarian.

10/26/48 – Driving classes offered to girls. Roller skating very popular. 120’ of new seating added to grandstands.

11/23/48 – Former band director Frank Bushnell dies.

1949

2/22/49 – New cafeteria opens. Said to be one of the finest in the state. A complete lunch of soup, vegetables, meat, beverage and dessert costs 52 cents. It has a dishwasher, a large stove, steam table, 3 sinks, storeroom and an office. Next fall, a walk-in freezer, 2 baking ovens, a cooking oven and an electric soup kettle will be added. Run by a manager and an assistant and helped by 7 student volunteers. Damascus Dairy will deliver milk in paper carton to eliminate the washing of bottles. Teacher Barbara Lappala, former congressional secretary to Senator Hale Boggs of LA joins BHS.

3/22/49 – $300,000 Bond vote to go to voters for new home economics and science classrooms and a gymnasium-auditorium.

April 13, 1949, 11:56a, a 7.1 magnitude earthquake centered in Olympia, WA is felt all over the PNW. Building suffers some cracks in the brick facade and on the ceiling in one classroom. BHS closed school for the day “not because of danger but because the quake left them little concern for their studies,” according to IR Metzler.

Class of ’49-41% attend college

4/26/49 – Earthquake causes school to be closed early.

5/17/49 – new building plans being drawn including new science and home ec classrooms, tennis courts going to be fixed up.

9/27/49 – Construction begins on new science wing. Lavelle Flannery article re swimming. Enrollment above 700. Victory bell given by Southern Pacific Railroad.

10/25/49 – School sends 2238 candy bars overseas to war-torn countries. Bob Sayre article.

11/22/49 – Yearbook gets ‘First class rating’ form National Scholastic Press Association. New student, Jim Kibbee, transfer from Philippine Islands. Spent 3 years in a Manila prison camp.

12/20/49 – Jimmy Tsugawa article. BHS photography department leader in state.

Germany was divided into Eastern and Western Germany as a result of the Allied powers — the United States, the United Kingdom, France and the Soviet Union — taking control after World War II.

1950

2/21/50 – Polish immigrant, Mrs. Blanka Rothschild, a local resident, speaks to students about her life in a German concentration camp and work with the underground during the war. Enrollment at 780.

3/21/50 – Flying saucers are a big topic at school. Article on Jim Tsugawa. Class of ’50-55 go to college.

9/26/50 – Enrollment at 828, Faculty at 30. New gym reading ready in Nov. Lavelle Flannery article.

10/24/50 – Jim Tsugawa article.

11/21/50 – New BHS school bus, 1950 Dodge, holds 60 student.

12/19/50 – Atomic bomb safety instruction at school. Tsugawa article. Bernice Connoly, photo teacher, demolishes wall between two small darkrooms to make a bigger one. Article re new gym – hoping to be complete by end of school year. Plans for swimming pool and varsity dressing rooms, removal of 3rd floor. 8 period day discussed (to replace 6 period day)

President Truman’s orders to aid South Korea prompted America’s entrance into the Korean War.

1951

1/30/51 – Atomic bomb raid information for BHS & Washington County. Article about what students can do to help during time of national emergency – Korean War.

3/27/51 – $500,000 bond election to cover a 12 classroom wing, indoor swimming pool, addition to school garage, building alterations, completion of Physical Education department. *Drawing of plans in Hummer.

4/17/51 – Bond vote fails. Penny drive for war. Girls locker room is “deplorable”.

5/15/51 – New gym ready for graduation. Article about draft. Third floor condemned. It is commonly thought that the instability of the third floor, causing its condemnation was due to the 1949 earthquake, but the instability was actually caused by the removal of a support wall between two classrooms on the second floor sometime during the ‘30s or ‘40s which caused the floor to sag and shake. The engineers also proclaimed the floor joists to be inadequate and the concrete to be of poor quality. The removal happened during the summer of 1951.

$350,000 bond vote-$200,000 for new classrooms, $65,000 for completion of girl’s section of gym, $35,000 to remove the condemned 3rd floor, alter rooms under the old gym and pave certain parking areas, $10,000 for additions to the bus garage, $40,000 to provide equipment for classrooms and bleachers for the gym.

7/51 – Fire at school. Damage at $5000-$7000. Typewriters, desks, chairs and files destroyed. Schedules that the vice principal had been working on for a month were all destroyed. Ledgers and receipt books charred and water damaged. Fire broke out on the roof, leaving a gaping hole in the ceilings of the office and main hallway.

William Logan hired.

9/25/51 – enrollment is 898

10/23/51 – student fundraiser for new lawn and ‘community chest’. Building of new classrooms begins, should be finished in June. BHS girls form bowling club.

1952

Enrollment is 1005.

2/26/52 – New wing to be completed by May.

9/30/53 – Article about how television is affecting studies & survey about TVs. 1929 school schedule found.

10/28/52 – New electric scoreboard for football field. Cost was $1,400.00 It is 18’ x 9.5’. It was student/parent financed. BHS students choose Eisenhower for president. Girls volleyball established. East wing addition adds 15 classrooms. 1952 college tuition costs: State schools-$100-$200 per year Private schools-$400-$500 per year.

1953

Facts and figures:

6912 pieces of chalk used.

Band costs: $15,500

Students spend $52-$70 per year on supplies, donation and activity fees.

Boys prefer argyles to plain socks and plain shirts over plaid

Favorite gum flavors are double mint and spearmint

Pee Chee folders are favored over notebooks

Average student takes 1,622 steps at school each day.

One month of running the school costs $1,442.00 ($8.49 for gas, $59.36 for telephone, $301.84 for heat, $394.00 for water, $678.73 for light.)

Approximately 600 candy bars are sold at the snack bar daily

1/20/53 – Fire in science wing.

3/13/53 – Mr. Metzler retiring after 30 years. (large article with photos in Hummer)

4/21/53 – New Principal Karl Kahle.

5/12/53 – Mike Metzler Day May 16th. George Erickson new VP. Teachers form local association.

10/2/53 – $611,000 bond approved (24 new classrooms, multi-purpose auditorium, music rooms, and a heating plant. BHS to have ham radio station. Fall of 1953 enrollment: 1099 students, 44 faculty. Tennis courts moving to lot adjacent to football field. New building to house 1800-2000 student. Junior Dorothy Johnson gets Hollywood screen tests, meets Debbie Reynolds.

10/30/53 – Proposed rec program (THPRD) needs BUHS support.

12/18/53 – Election for proposed recreational district. Break in at school office nets burglar $15.00. Tuberculosis main killer 15-34.

1954

1/29/54 – Construction bids open.

3/26/54 – Men’s basketball first in district

10/22/54 – Ground Observance Corps founded. They are directed to watch for enemy air attacks. Members give up 2 hours per week to be on watch.

10/8/54 – First science and drama clubs.

11/12/54 – Concession stand built for field-costs $225.08. 56 bowlers on bowling team.

12/3/54 – Facts:

Building is 450’ long x 250’ wide

3 custodians

25 drinking fountains

11 telephones

4480 windows

80 intercoms

Football grandstand seat 600

East gym seats 2500

15 buses

12/17/54 – Damerow Ford provides new car for Driver’s Ed class. Dorothy Johnson, Junior, crowned Miss City of Roses.

The Supreme Court declared separate-but-equal education in public schools illegal in the landmark Brown v. Board of Education case.

1955   

2/4/55 – Dorothy Johnson article.

4/15/55 – Photo of the new auditorium in Hummer. Dedication of new auditorium to be in late April.

4/29/55 – New auditorium dedicated. Atomic bomb drill at school.

5/27/55 – Hoop skirts popular at school. Students predict what life will be like in 2155. Students develop color slides at school for the first time.

9/9/55 – Staff at 56 (18 new teachers). 12 new classrooms. $12,000 spent on library. New tennis courts. New P.E. equipment: shuffleboards, girl’s locker baskets, gym apparatus, more baseball diamonds. Boys will use East gym, girls will use West gym. School gets out at 3:25. BHS has a school nurse. Each class has their own counselor. Student body at 1391. Dorothy Johnson, ’55 alum, competes for Miss America in Atlantic City.

9/23/55 – Dorothy Johnson is runner up for Miss America. THPRD formed and William Pond is first Superintendent.

10/7/55 – BUHS Board purchases land near Sunset Highway for a new school to be built for $1,500.00/acre. Library updates article and photo. Article on BUHS marching band and band program of 26 years – Frank E. Bushnell, Melvin B. Wells and Allan G. Robertson. 72 students enrolled in Driver’s Ed.

10/21/55 – Article about the history of BUHS Choir program.

11/4/55 – History of BUHS Photography classes since 1943.

11/18/55 – THPRD plans programs “from cradle to grave”. History of BUHS Drama Dept. District plans for increases in enrollment; predicts 2500 students in BHS by 1960.     Debating building Junior High Schools or a new High School.

12/2/55 – BUHS joins Valley Coast League with Hillsboro, Astoria, Gresham, Milwaukie, Parkrose, David Douglas and Central Catholic.

1956

1/13/56 – BHS student poll on religious views of students (see page 3 for corrections)

1/27/56 – History of BHS Industrial Arts program.

10/12/56 – School band to be televised during luxury liner ‘Mariposa’ christening in Portland. Students give mixed opinions of “Elvis the pelvis” in the Hummer.

10/26/56 – Sunset High School plans being made. Guidance program grows as BHS adds counselors.

11/9/56 – Plans for new HS

1957

2/8/57 – Harlem Globetrotters entertain at School.

3/7/57 – Fashion fads: mock turtlenecks, V-neck sweaters, straight or pleated skirts, toreador blouses.

4/12/57 – New Pool is completed. Admission: 15 cents ages through grade school, 25 cents for high school students, 50cents for adults. (photo in Hummer)

5/24/57 – Election to determine if there will be a new high school. *Drawing of planned Sunset high school in Hummer.

6/7/57 – Senior David Wistrand dies during Senior Field Day.

9/13/57 – Position of Student Activity Director created.

11/22/57 – New High School to be called Tualatin Valley High (future Sunset HS)

12/20/57 – Globetrotters to perform again at school. Girls swim 4th in state.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. founded the Southern Christian Leadership Council (SCLC) alongside Baynard Rustin, Rev. Joseph Lowrey, Fred Shuttlesworth and Ralph Abernathy.

1958

Class of 1958 has 339, 204 attend college (60.3%), 23 attend vocational schools, 80 are employed, and 24 join the military.

1/17/58 – Home teaching program article. It began in Fall of 1954.

2/7/58 – Article on home teaching program.

9/12/58 – Beaverton will now have 2 shifts of students until the new Sunset High School opens in January 1959. Beaverton students go from 7:30-12:30. Sunset students start at 12:30 and I’m assuming go until 5:00 (it doesn’t say).

9/26/58 – Fashion Fads: Shorter skirts, lowered waists, modified chemise, trapeze skirt, empire waistline, sack dress, stitched down pleats, bulky sweaters. Total enrollment of both sets of students is 2300.

10/24/58 – $600,000 Bond vote to finish Sunset HS set for Nov. 14.

11/7/58 – Sunset students attend BHS late shift until new school is finished.

11/26/58 – $600,000 Bond passes. New Synchronized Swimming club at BHS. Staff is at 64.

12/23/58 – Girl’s Swim gets third in State, sets record for 50 yard breast stroke and and 200 yard free relay.

Jack Kilby invented the integrated circuit, an ancestor to the CMOS computer chips that power electronic devices today. Kilby went on to win the Nobel Prize in 2000.

1959

January-Sunset High School opens. Beaverton back to one shift of students.

1/16/59 – New optional 7th period to be added next year.

2/13/59 – *Photo of former cafeteria in Hummer

2/27/59 – Girls start wearing sneakers to school.

3/8/59 – Harlem Globetrotters perform at Beaverton

5/29/59 – Teacher Amarette Barnes to retire after 30 years at BHS

9/18/59 – Student body cards will now have students photos. Voters to decide on District Unification Issue. Class of ’59 alum, Karlyn Mattsson, competes in Miss America as Miss Oregon.

10/30/59 – *Photo of Victory Bell in Hummer. Beaverton Custodian, Mr. John Zimmer, spoke at the International Relations Meeting about his six years in a Russian labor camp. He was in the German army and taken prisoner in 1944 by Russians (*photo of him in Hummer). Article on synchronized swimming.

11/13//59 – Proposal for a Unified School District. Article on concession stand: Football season sold 5,000 boxes of popcorn, 2500 soft drinks, 1799 Candy bars, 1100 lollipops.

12/4/59 – 2nd vote on unified district set for 12/21. Boys Swim gets 2nd in State.

12/18/59 – Girl’s swim team wins state championship, coached by Rod Harman. Freshman Carolyn Wood set 3 new state records. New orchestra ensemble at BHS.

1960

2/19/60 – Article on BHS trophy case; contains 251 awards.

3/4/60 – Student Poll on smoking, dating, future plans, ability grouping and the military.

4/1/60 – Beaverton school buses now total 16. They travel 1000 miles a day. They make 77 trips per day. The first bus leaves the garage at 6:30 am and the last bus returns to the garage at 6:20pm after the activities run. Many of the drivers have second jobs.

4/29/60 – Freshman Carolyn Wood to compete in Olympics in Rome.

9/9/60 – 14 year old Carolyn Wood wins Gold medal at Rome Olympics in the 400m relay. She swims the third leg. District 48 becomes Unified Beaverton School District. Fashion fads: Girls-skulots (Bermuda length skirts made like culottes), bold colors, big plaids, pointed shoes. Boys-wool shirts (Pendleton), khaki pants, big sweaters, corduroy suits, bright vests, continental trousers, low-cut tennis shoes, white sweat socks, green, green, green!

9/23/60 – Sunset marks its 4th year.

10/7/60 – Superintendent D. Herbert Armstrong says school board is deciding if Beaverton should have junior high schools. They feel a better education program is possible with a 6-3-3 program, Elementary 1-6, Junior high 7-9, high school 10-12. District enrollment is increasing approx 1000 students per year. Principal Erickson has mixed feelings about losing the Freshman. The Library now has 11,100 volumes. Library originally was in the back of the study hall, partitioned from the rest of the room. In 1936, all books were tabulated in alphabetical order and fiction books were divided into classes. In 1942, each student librarian (?) was required to make a display covering any topic to make the library more effective. In addition, librarians supplied flowers for the reading room each week. At the beginning of the 50’s, it was estimated that an average of 80 books were checked out daily, with 25 students using the library each period. In 1952, the library was described as being “a handy noontime rendezvous, a place to catch up on the latest crime-busting activities of Dick Tracy or a quiet resting nook. Some people even go there to study.” Centennial High School is built.

11/18/60 – School board approves 3 junior high schools, asks for a 4 million bond.

12/9/60 – Boy’s and Girl’s swim win State Championships (Boys tie with Lake Oswego).

1961

1/20/61 – $3.5 million bond goes to voters for 3 junior high schools construction. Students remember split schedule and talk over coming bond issue in Hummer article.

2/3/61 – Bond measure fails.

4/21/61 – Beaverton chosen as 1 of 10 secondary schools in the USA to be recognized for excellence in science and math. Beaverton’s Future Nurses of America receives National Charter.

5/26/61 – Governor Hatfield speaks at Beaverton.

1960 – 1961 recap:

Fashion-The year of the short skirt, baggy sweaters, tennis shoes and long socks

Sports-300 students lettered, Swim, boys and girls win state, Carolyn wood won gold at Olympics.

9/22/61 – IBM electric typewriters arrive at Beaverton.

11/3/61 – Mrs. Harry Barnes, class of ’12 (as a 10th grader) honored at half time of football game as the oldest alum. (There was no 11th or 12th grade then.)

11/17/61 – Civil Defense Program planned for Beaverton (to prepare for Atomic attack). New School Song introduced: “Hats off to Beavers”. Words and music by Stephen L. Stone. There is much fear for a WWIII.

12/1/61 – Football gets 2nd in State. Boys swim 1st in State, Girls swim 2nd in State. New Bond Measure proposed. Dropped to $2.6 million for 2 Junior Highs instead of 3. They will be the future Whitford and Meadow Park. They will be saving tax payers money by using the same architectural plans for both schools.

Alan Shepard became the first American in space. He helmed the Freedom 7 capsule.

1962

2/23/62 – “Bullwinkle” is favorite TV show of Beaverton High students. Physics teacher, Mr. Ted Gonzalez, relates his past as a National Golden Gloves champ, fighter pilot, counter-espionage agent, and member of the medical corps.

3/9/62 – Mass polio immunization at Beaverton High.

3/30/62 – Bond measure passes to build 2 junior high schools.

5/25/62 – Class of ’61 stats: 58% go to college, 23% employed, 10% armed forces, 5% training for business, 3% housewives, 1% unemployed.

9/14/62 -”Twist” ban lifted at BHS!! College credit Biology class added to BHS curriculum

9/28/62 – Wigs are the new fad at BHS.

10/12/62 – $1,840,000 Bond discussed for 3rd junior high school and addition of 9th grade wings on the 2 existing junior highs. Article on alumni successes. New Superintendent Dr. Thomas E. Woods. Underground room found-gymnasium under cafeteria.

10/26/62 – Article on BHS buses: 49 drivers, 7000 student riders, 1,300 miles a day

11/9/62 – Drawing of new school (additions if bond measure passes). School Board announces Civil Defense Plan.

11/30/62 – Football wins league championship (photo in Hummer). Dick is most popular boy’s name at BHS. Girl’s swimming 2nd in state, Boy’s swimming 5th in state.

12/18/62 – Bond measure fails.

1963

1/11/63 – Bond measure will be resubmitted to voters on 2/25.

2/22/63 – Fashion fads: suspenders, boots for girls (the shock of it!!). Article about swimmer Carolyn Wood.

3/8/63 – Bond measure fails again. Dayle Viar, class of ‘62, selected “Miss Portland”. Faculty plans new “Team Teaching” and “Block classes”. Year round school discussed.

5/24/63 – Hair fads: girl’s-unteased, sleek hair. Boy’s-bangs. All night senior party planned. 80% of class of ‘63 going to college. Re-cap of 62/63 sports: football-1st in league, swim-girl’s 2nd in state, boy’s 5th in state, cross country-13th in state, tennis-league champs.

9/13/63 – Parking not offered to student drivers. They must find parking away from the school. Fashion trends: girls-loafers, boots and riding apparel, sporty and layered looks, pants with patches, tweeds, turtlenecks, dickies, fake fur, vests, wrap around skirts, lower heels. Clothing rules at BHS: Girls can’t wear culottes in any form and beach shifts not allowed. Boys can’t wear sloppy sweatshirts or cut-off jeans and no Bermuda shorts without long socks.

9/27/63 – Changes to BHS: Merle Davies is in use as part of BHS, 16 classroom there are being used. New language lab, new teachers workroom, new scoreboard on football field, new football lights.

10/11/63 – New bond proposal for $3,870,000 for 2 junior high schools. *Photo of unfinished Whitford Jr. High School. Pep Club re-forming. Article about Merle Davies. Bus Drivers Article: 64 drivers, each work 4 hours/day, 9000 riders, 6 new buses bought this year at $11,000 each, 57 buses for Beaverton/Sunset, 4 mechanics, 2 gas fillers, drivers begin their day at 5:45 am to arrive at garage by 6:30, 3551 bus trips/day, garage closes at 6:30 pm, buses travel about 500,000 miles per year. Photo in Hummer of bus and driver.

10/25/63 – $3,870,000 bond measure approved: will finish Whitford and Meadow Park and build 2 more junior high schools and purchase land for future sites. Article about the 2 junior high schools. Article on campus cop Walt Fain and photo. Article on history of BHS homecoming.

11/8/63 – 1892 photo of school and History of Beaverton article.

11/22/63 – Football team wins 3rd consecutive Metro title *photo. Photo of 63/64 cheerleaders. History of Beaverton part 2. Swim wins league title.

President John F. Kennedy was assassinated by Lee Harvey Oswald in Dallas while traveling in an open motorcade (nothing in Hummer about assassination).

12/13/63 – Article about students complaining about crossing street between BHS and Merle Davies in the rain. *photo. Girls swim 2nd in state, boys swim 6th in state

1964

1/31/64 – Mary Travis of Peter, Paul and Mary wears a BHS sweatshirt, a gift from her acquaintance, BHS junior, Claudia Cranston. *Photo in Hummer.

2/14/64 – Beatles haircut fad at BHS.

3/13/64 – Skateboarding is the latest fad.

5/8/64 – New sister school in Amagasaki, Japan, *photo in Hummer.

5/29/64 – BHS teacher John Needham dies in hospital. Sports recap for 63/64 year: football-metro champs, boys swim-metro champs, 6th in state, girl’s swim Metro champs, 2nd in state, ski-2nd in state, rifle team-1st in metro, golf-Mary Wolfe, senior, wins state.

10/23/64 – Honda motorcycle fad *photo in hummer.

1965

3/12/65 – Article on history of grandstands *photo in Hummer.

4/2/65 – Article on history of BHS *photo.

4/16/65 – Fashion trends: girls-’You would be shocked if you saw someone downtown Portland in slacks!” For boys-madras shirts, white mid-calf jeans, tennis shoes and hair down to the eyebrows.

4/30/65 – History of Spring Reign, 2nd year of intramural soccer teams.

6/12/65 – BHS band and Rhythm B’s in the Rose Festival Parade *photo in Hummer.

1966

Grandstands (built in ‘38) are torn down.

[Editor: BHS stopped retaining issues of the Hummer in 1966.]

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September 2016 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find over a hundred stories and over a thousand photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

1903-11-02 page 1 Morning Oregonian detail

We begin each regular meeting with a 30-minute history presentation at 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center, 7475 SW Oleson Rd, on the second Monday of the month:

  • October 10, 2016 – Tom Shreve will discuss the 1903 Halloween night slaying of Adolph Burkhardt by Samuel Bauman on “the Garden Home road”, unusual capital murder trial proceedings, and the mystery of where the shooting happened.

New stories on website

We’ve posted a photo gallery and a collection stories collected during the August 13, 2016 Beaverton High and Garden Home School Reunion held on a lovely Saturday at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We estimated about a hundred people joined us for the event.

Our Beaverton High School Chronology story contains excerpts from an extensive chronology of Beaverton High School by Lisa Sandmire, derived from past issues of the Beaverton High newspaper, The Hummer, and other historical sources.

We have obituaries for long-time Garden Home resident Richard Hyslin (died 2016), former superindent of Garden Home school Wayne S. Thurman (died 1997), and former Beaverton High principal Bill Logan (died 2010).

Other News

The Beat Goes On Marching Band

The Beat Goes On Marching Band

From Patti Waitman-Ingebretsen  (Maplewood girl)….Attention Garden Home and Beaverton HS alums – Here is your chance to play your instrument once again with others from your era.  Garden Home Rec Center gym is the location for rehearsals of “The Beat Goes on Marching Band”, ages 18 and older who played in high school, college, military bands.  This is your chance to enjoy our favorite rehearsal venue (Garden Home). We are the one having way too much fun and we invite you to join us. The band also includes color guard, dance and majorettes so we invite all to check out our website and let us know so we can welcome you.  Also, in exchange for allowing TBGO to utilize rehearsal spaces in the building, TBGO band members are volunteers who decorate and serve at Garden Homes\ yearly  December Holiday event. Visit TheBeatGoesOnMB.org for more info.

We are researching the 1949 earthquake that damaged Garden Home School and the third floor of Beaverton High. What do you recall? Leave us a comment.

We have identified Century Homes in Garden Home that were built before 1916. The program is meant to honor and appreciate the older homes in our community and the role they’ve played in our history. The home owners have been notified that they may participate in this program of a small ceremony of placing a Century Home plaque beside the front door and accepting a nice pamphlet with the history of Garden Home and their home. The attractive plaque notes the age of the house and does not affect the sale or any changes in the property.

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Patsy VandeVenter, Virginia Vanture, Elaine Shreve, Carole Vranizan

Get your Historic Garden Home t-shirt now for just $14 for small to XL. Larger XXL and XXXL sizes are $17. There is an additional charge of $9 to mail your shirt. They’re fun! Available at the Garden Home Market Place or by mail from Patsy VandeVenter, 7520 SW Ashdale Ct., Portland, OR 97223. We thank Jan Fredrickson for a very generous donation to cover the cost of printing the shirts.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

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